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Fort Worth Moves into 13th Place


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#301 Nitixope

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Posted 05 April 2023 - 02:11 PM

California's "exodus" is more motivated by housing costs than it is by taxes.

 

Recently passed updates to policies that govern the building of new housing is very likely to FINALLY help bend the pricing curve in California...
 

 

US-california-housing-CAR-2023-02-16-SF-US-california-housing-CAR-2023-02-16-SF-



#302 george84

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Posted 05 April 2023 - 02:17 PM

Surprised about Austin!

#303 ramjet

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Posted 05 April 2023 - 04:39 PM

Surprised about Austin!

Pure speculation on my part, but the City of Austin has become so expensive to live in, I would bet its growth has slowed.  Also speculation, but It will probably continue to grow aggressively in the areas surrounding the city as they are a bit more affordable.



#304 steave

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Posted 05 April 2023 - 06:34 PM

I wonder if smaller household sizes also contribute to population loss in California cities. That would explain how demand can keep home prices high with fewer people. Higher income demographics would have fewer children.



#305 Doohickie

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Posted 05 April 2023 - 10:03 PM

I wonder if smaller household sizes also contribute to population loss in California cities. That would explain how demand can keep home prices high with fewer people. Higher income demographics would have fewer children.

Oh, even with the decrease in population there's still a housing shortage, guaranteed.


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#306 rriojas71

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Posted 05 April 2023 - 11:54 PM

California's "exodus" is more motivated by housing costs than it is by taxes.

 

Recently passed updates to policies that govern the building of new housing is very likely to FINALLY help bend the pricing curve in California...
 

I totally agree with you on this point.  I lived in the bay area for 16 years and it was 1 of the main reasons why I left



#307 johnfwd

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Posted 06 April 2023 - 05:10 PM

Being a Fort Worth native, I'm biased.  But I can see Fort Worth surpassing these other cities in population because our city is--overall--a good place to reside, work, and enjoy cultural and recreational activities.  Surprisingly, our traffic system is not overwhelmed like it is in Dallas.  The city has  shown far-sightedness in encouraging the expansion of higher education institutions--notably A&M, UNT, TCU, and Tarleton State.  We have a walkable downtown with attractive tourist sites such as the Water Gardens and Sundance Square Plaza.  We have a city where museums and rodeos compete for tourist dollars. Dickie's Arena is our newest venue for sports activities.  And there's plenty of available land for economic and residential development on all sides of FW.  We have a rosy future ahead of us here.



#308 Doohickie

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Posted 10 April 2023 - 08:21 AM

Being a Fort Worth native, I'm biased.  But I can see Fort Worth surpassing these other cities in population because our city is--overall--a good place to reside, work, and enjoy cultural and recreational activities.  Surprisingly, our traffic system is not overwhelmed like it is in Dallas.  The city has  shown far-sightedness in encouraging the expansion of higher education institutions--notably A&M, UNT, TCU, and Tarleton State.  We have a walkable downtown with attractive tourist sites such as the Water Gardens and Sundance Square Plaza.  We have a city where museums and rodeos compete for tourist dollars. Dickie's Arena is our newest venue for sports activities.  And there's plenty of available land for economic and residential development on all sides of FW.  We have a rosy future ahead of us here.

I would say that downtown Ft Worth is pretty accessible in its scale.  Also, in other cities I've lived, downtown was more of an island surrounded by ghetto.  Downtown Fort Worth flows into the Near Southside, the Cultural District, and to a lesser extent the Stockyards pretty seamlessly.  (And hopefully development north of downtown spurred by TRV will enhance that.)


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#309 Austin55

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Posted 18 May 2023 - 01:38 PM

Census released 2022 estimates today. The big takeaway: Fort Worth is #1 for numeric growth. (Has this ever happened before?) 

 

Fort Worth is still in 13th place, but seems on pace to overtake San Jose in just a few months, mostly because San Jose is shrinking pretty fast. 

Fort Worth should hit one million in 2025, and if current pace holds will overtake both Austin and Jacksonville in the rankings, around 2026, which will would make Fort Worth the 10th largest city in the country. 

https://www.census.g...-estimates.html



#310 John T Roberts

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Posted 18 May 2023 - 09:30 PM

I still can't believe the city has grown so much.



#311 johnfwd

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Posted 19 May 2023 - 06:21 AM

Not only is Fort Worth growing, but the "suburban" communities are, as well.  Benbrook, which is south of where I live, is a good example.  This community is experiencing residential and economic development.  The problem with Fort Worth is that its city limits is interspersed with some of these communities--Benbrook, Cityview, Haltom City are examples.  What is the population of the "Fort Worth Metropolitan area?"



#312 elpingüino

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Posted 19 May 2023 - 06:40 AM

What is the population of the "Fort Worth Metropolitan area?"

This article says the whole Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area grew by 170,000 in 2022 and is now 7.9 million. Haven't yet seen any figures that show just the Fort Worth side of the Metroplex on its own.

https://spectrumloca...-area--houston-

#313 FunkyTownTay

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Posted 19 May 2023 - 07:10 AM

There are probably a hundred different views on how to define the "Fort Worth metro area," but the 2022 estimate for Tarrant county is 2,154,595. 15th largest county by population in the US.

 

https://en.wikipedia...e_United_States



#314 ramjet

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Posted 26 May 2023 - 07:09 PM

From 5/23/23 Texas Monthly:

 

https://www.texasmon...-census-update/



#315 rriojas71

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Posted 26 May 2023 - 10:58 PM

From 5/23/23 Texas Monthly:

 

https://www.texasmon...-census-update/

Great article.  I feel that FW is on the verge of stuff happening, but to what extent I can't predict.  The shenanigans going on in DC aren't doing us any favors.



#316 John T Roberts

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Posted 02 June 2023 - 07:38 AM

WFAA Channel 8 did a story last night on the 6 PM News about the race between Austin and Fort Worth to first reach 1 million people.  Matt Houston is the reporter:

 

https://www.wfaa.com...7c-516ab32e7605



#317 FunkyTownTay

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Posted 20 February 2024 - 10:48 PM

https://worldpopulat...w.com/us-cities

According to the 2023 estimates on that page, Fort Worth has passed San Jose and is only about 4500 residents away from passing both Jacksonville and Austin to move up to the 10th most populous US city. This is *projected based on recent estimates,* so who knows how accurate that is.

 

It's been about 10 months since I posted this and the same website has now posted with 2024 population estimates. It now has Fort Worth at number 11, having surpassed Austin and still remaining about 5000 behind Jacksonville.



#318 Nitixope

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Posted 21 February 2024 - 04:59 AM

Wow! Based on the number of new housing developments I bet we overtake Jacksonville soon for top 10, however Jacksonville is increasing also at a healthy 1.46% rate, I guess I just dont know that city well enough to understand the factors involved in their growth.

#319 Doohickie

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Posted 21 February 2024 - 06:56 AM

Wow! Based on the number of new housing developments I bet we overtake Jacksonville soon for top 10, however Jacksonville is increasing also at a healthy 1.46% rate, I guess I just dont know that city well enough to understand the factors involved in their growth.

Interesting thing about JAX, they are be far the least dense of the top cities.  Out of the top 300, they are the 277th most dense.  (OKC is even less dense.)  What that tells me is there is still open land around the city, which implies there won't be much growth through annexation.


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#320 elpingüino

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Posted 21 February 2024 - 07:46 AM

Jacksonville is one of the largest cities in the US by area. 747 sqmi of land area, compared to Fort Worth's 350. https://en.m.wikiped..._cities_by_area

#321 Austin55

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Posted 21 February 2024 - 09:25 AM

Jacksonville is basically a county-city, where the city limits and county limits are the same except for a few small suburbs in the county.



#322 Austin55

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Posted 21 February 2024 - 09:31 AM

Speaking of housing units, I saw this handy tool shared in another urban-based discussion group recently: https://housing-data.vercel.app/

 

Cities ranked 9-12 in the World Population Review list, charted by units permitted per year. Jacksonville didn't have complete data, but Duvall County did, so Jacksonville's real numbers are going to be slightly less. Cities ranked 9-12 in the World Population Review list. 5 year averages. 

 

68qOd1j.png



#323 elpingüino

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Posted 15 March 2024 - 09:32 AM

This week the Census Bureau released new estimates this week for counties and metro areas as of July 1, 2023.

- The DFW Metroplex grew by 152,000, the most in the US.
- Tarrant grew by 27,301, the ninth in the US. That's like we tacked on another Colleyville last year.
- Tarrant population is now 2.182 million
- Tarrant had natural population growth (births as opposed to relocations) of 13,010, fifth in the US.

All the data, https://www.census.g...ties-total.html

News articles,
https://www.dallasne...-new-residents/
https://www.star-tel...e286667310.html
https://www.nbcdfw.c...growth/3489168/
https://www.axios.co...ion-growth-2024




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