Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Speaking of Arlington


  • Please log in to reply
44 replies to this topic

#1 McHand

McHand

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Shaw-Clarke
  • Interests:music, neighborhoods, kids, education, biking, politics, urbanism, food, friends, family

Posted 08 August 2005 - 08:52 PM

I have an aunt who lives near UTA. I've always felt her side of town felt more like a community than other parts, which just feel like sterile suburbs.

Why hasn't Arlington capitalized on the population of UTA, attracting students to live on campus rather than commute? Student populations are fertile ground for diverse neighborhoods. Just look at Denton or Austin.

Voice & Guitars in The Crystal Furs
Elementary Music Specialist, FWISD

Texas Wesleyan 2015
Shaw-Clarke NA 


#2 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 08 August 2005 - 09:30 PM

I hear they have a great Architectual school. Maybe they could apply their learnings into a new project to attract residents and urban junkies. Maybe.

Student populations are fertile ground for diverse neighborhoods


And THRIVING ones too.
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#3 Sam Stone

Sam Stone

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,036 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Overton, then Monticello, now expat in OC, CA

Posted 08 August 2005 - 11:01 PM

It's not just that Arlington has not capitalized on UTA, but that UTA has not acted as a member of the community. I've heard some rumblings that the new pres is interested in in integrating the school more into the community, but that is definitely a recent development.

I agree about the neighborhoods near UTA. They definitely have more of a community feeling than the rest of Arlington.

I think there is tremendous potential in Arlington but I don't believe the city/citizens/UTA/businesses have the will to follow through with any plans to make the area more urban.

Re: the architecture program, our great forum administrator is a graduate.

#4 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,560 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 09 August 2005 - 10:45 PM

It's not just that Arlington has not capitalized on UTA, but that UTA has not acted as a member of the community.  I've heard some rumblings that the new pres is interested in in integrating the school more into the community, but that is definitely a recent development.


There is a master plan for downtown Arlington, and you can find it at this link

Pretty cool ideas, most of them borrowed from other more "successful" college towns, Athens, GA for example. Worth checking out if you have the time.

#5 SouthSideAllan2000

SouthSideAllan2000

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 48 posts
  • Location:Southhills

Posted 10 August 2005 - 12:35 PM

How far along are they on their Arlington 2025 plan? I don't really see Arlington changing much before maybe 2015 as far as becoming more pedestrian friendly/urban. So I don't know if they will have their 'vision' by 2025. Maybe once they see our TRV being accomplished, they will want to out do us and they will focus on their residents instead of the big money players that got and are getting them to build stadiums and such.

#6 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,570 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 10 August 2005 - 02:20 PM

One other thing worth noting on the lack of community surrounding UTA is that, prior to the mid-90's, on-campus housing was almost non-existent at the University.

#7 McHand

McHand

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Shaw-Clarke
  • Interests:music, neighborhoods, kids, education, biking, politics, urbanism, food, friends, family

Posted 11 August 2005 - 06:39 AM

I understand that to be true. How ridiculous!! Why wouldn't a major university want more students to live on campus? Don't they make some money from it? (They may not...I don't know; but with the cost of room and board it seems that they would.)

Voice & Guitars in The Crystal Furs
Elementary Music Specialist, FWISD

Texas Wesleyan 2015
Shaw-Clarke NA 


#8 Buck

Buck

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts

Posted 11 August 2005 - 09:18 AM

UTA has added hundreds of dorm rooms in the last 5 years.

The master plan calls for bringing more students to campus and more economic development to Arlington's downtown.

Check out the new dorms on Center Street.

#9 RenaissanceMan

RenaissanceMan

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:22 AM

Richard Greene opinion piece in Star-Telegram bemoaning lack of recognition of Arlington as it's own city... sorry if sympathy is hard to be found in Fort Worth.

http://www.star-tele...tml?sp=/99/242/

#10 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,895 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:44 AM

....bemoaning lack of recognition of Arlington as it's own city... sorry if sympathy is hard to be found in Fort Worth.
 

 

 There is understanding among many, including myself, within Fort Worth for Arlington's legitimate feelings for the need of some greatly deserved recognition.



#11 RenaissanceMan

RenaissanceMan

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:46 AM


....bemoaning lack of recognition of Arlington as it's own city... sorry if sympathy is hard to be found in Fort Worth.
 

 
 There is understanding among many, including myself, within Fort Worth for Arlington's legitimate feelings for some greatly deserved recognition.

Maybe that came across differently than I'd intended. Perhaps I should simply say, welcome to the club.

#12 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:06 PM

This really frustrates me. Arlington needs to learn it's place: a SUBURB of Fort Worth and Dallas!

 

Arlington is a suburb, not a metro anchor, and should expect to be called Fort Worth or Dallas.

 

I call the suburb I live in "Fort Worth" whenever I leave the metroplex.


- Dylan


#13 urbancowboy

urbancowboy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 113 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Was Philly, now Houston
  • Interests:Sustainable, Livable, Urbanism

Posted 13 July 2014 - 06:31 PM

This really frustrates me. Arlington needs to learn it's place: a SUBURB of Fort Worth and Dallas!
 
Arlington is a suburb, not a metro anchor, and should expect to be called Fort Worth or Dallas.
 
I call the suburb I live in "Fort Worth" whenever I leave the metroplex.

I grew up for the most part on Arlington and Grapevine/Euless area, when people ask where I am from I am from Fort Worth. It is a suburb, although very large.

#14 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,570 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:56 PM

I've been relaxing on a cruise ship in the Caribbean for a week and the Richard Greene piece was just enough to get me worked up into a lather upon my return. If the people that spent so much time bemoaning or worrying about a perceived lack of respect for their city (and I'm not just pointing at Arlington, I'm talking about FW, Dallas, and any points between and around) spent their time a) not worrying about it or B) actually doing something about it, they would find themselves much happier enjoying their respective cities for what they really are. It bugs the crap out of me to see Mayor Greene write something like this. The list of living people from Arlington who can speak from experience about actions speaking louder than words when it comes to earning respect for their city is pretty short and he is on that list.

#15 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,895 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 13 July 2014 - 10:58 PM

...the Richard Greene piece was just enough to get me worked up into a lather upon my return. If the people that spent so much time bemoaning or worrying about a perceived lack of respect for their city....[people] not worrying about it or B) actually doing something about it....The list of living people from Arlington who can speak from experience about actions speaking louder than words when it comes to earning respect for their city is pretty short and he is on that list.

 

Either you have forgotten history or you just may not know enough about Arlington. 

 

Richard Greene is a former mayor of Arlington and happened to be the mayor at the time when the Rangers were being seriously wooed by a city to the east of it.   And also, it was Greene who introduced the efforts to bring the Olympics to North Texas, when, but of course, it became the idea piggybacked and taken over by a city to the east of it.  He had quite an impressive resume while being mayor.

 

Arlington and the Texas Rangers

 

"The stadium (Arlington Stadium) eventually began to show its age and inadequacy, and the City of Arlington approved the construction of a new stadium for the Rangers......the Rangers moved to the nearby Ballpark in Arlington and Arlington Stadium was demolished in 1994. The foul poles and home plate from Arlington Stadium were moved to the new ballpark, along with some of the bleachers. The bleachers are currently painted green, but their original blue color is occasionally visible in spots where the green paint has chipped. Home plate was inserted into place at the Ballpark in Arlington by Tom Schieffer, Richard Greene (then mayor of Arlington), Tom Vandergriff (former mayor responsible for bringing the team to Arlington, and George W. Bush (then team part-owner). 

 

Greene's Hill

220px-Greeneshill.jpg
magnify-clip.png
Globe Life Park in Arlington in 2006, with Greene's Hill in center field.

Greene's Hill is a sloped section of turf located behind the center field fence at the home field of the ballpark. The Hill serves as a batter's eye, providing a contrasting background behind the pitchers which enables hitters to more easily see the baseball after the pitcher's release. "Greene's Hill" was originally designed as a picnic area for fans but the Rangers have never initiated this policy. The hill was named after former Arlington mayor Richard Greene in November 1997.

 

By the way, credit Greene as the first one to say:"Arlington is nobody's damn suburb!"



#16 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,570 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 13 July 2014 - 11:39 PM

Yeah, all of that is what I was talking about when I said that he knows about actions over words. Instead of bitching and moaning about what he thinks is a lack of respect for Arlington in the paper, he should do something about it, like he did when he was mayor. Or just stop worrying about it. Begging for attention in a column does nothing for Arlington's image.

#17 RenaissanceMan

RenaissanceMan

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 14 July 2014 - 06:12 AM

What I find a little ironic is the timing of the opinion piece considering how much Arlington's profile has risen in the past few years, particularly with the Super Bowl and Final Four, and the enormous national exposure it's received lately. I hear way more people around Texas and outside of Texas talking about Arlington than ever before, some even talking about how they specifically consider Arlington when looking at places in Texas (or "around Dallas") to live.

#18 johnfwd

johnfwd

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:southwest
  • Interests:Running, bicycling, bowling, nightclub life, science, technology.

Posted 14 July 2014 - 09:11 AM

Having re-read Greene's opinion piece, I can't say I blame him for being upset by national news and sports media commentators who carelessly label whatever major event occurring in Arlington as "Dallas" or "North Texas."  That was Greene's primary beef.  His secondary beef, I believe, was that more national recognition of Arlington as a "American dream city" is needed.  I remember how proud Fort Worthians were when our city received the "All America City" award back in 1964.

 

I think the identity issue is exacerbated when the major sports arenas are called "Globe Life" or "AT&T" instead of including the name Arlington,  Didn't we in FW feel frustrated when a major NASCAR arena was called "Texas Motor Speedway" and not "Fort Worth Motor Speedway"?   When other cities on the NASCAR circuit have a speedway named after them (e.gs., "Atlanta Speedway" and "Daytona Speedway")?
 



#19 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,895 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 14 July 2014 - 09:19 AM

This really frustrates me. Arlington needs to learn it's place: a SUBURB of Fort Worth and Dallas!

 

Arlington is a suburb, not a metro anchor, and should expect to be called Fort Worth or Dallas.

 

I call the suburb I live in "Fort Worth" whenever I leave the metroplex.

 

 

I've been relaxing on a cruise ship in the Caribbean for a week and the Richard Greene piece was just enough to get me worked up into a lather upon my return. If the people that spent so much time bemoaning or worrying about a perceived lack of respect for their city (and I'm not just pointing at Arlington, I'm talking about FW, Dallas, and any points between and around) spent their time a) not worrying about it or B) actually doing something about it, they would find themselves much happier enjoying their respective cities for what they really are. It bugs the crap out of me to see Mayor Greene write something like this. The list of living people from Arlington who can speak from experience about actions speaking louder than words when it comes to earning respect for their city is pretty short and he is on that list.

 

 

 

...the Richard Greene piece was just enough to get me worked up into a lather upon my return. If the people that spent so much time bemoaning or worrying about a perceived lack of respect for their city....[people] not worrying about it or B) actually doing something about it....The list of living people from Arlington who can speak from experience about actions speaking louder than words when it comes to earning respect for their city is pretty short and he is on that list.

 

Either you have forgotten history or you just may not know enough about Arlington. 

 

Richard Greene is a former mayor of Arlington and happened to be the mayor at the time when the Rangers were being seriously wooed by a city to the east of it.   And also, it was Greene who introduced the efforts to bring the Olympics to North Texas, when, but of course, it became the idea piggybacked and taken over by a city to the east of it.  He had quite an impressive resume while being mayor.

 

Arlington and the Texas Rangers

 

"The stadium (Arlington Stadium) eventually began to show its age and inadequacy, and the City of Arlington approved the construction of a new stadium for the Rangers......the Rangers moved to the nearby Ballpark in Arlington and Arlington Stadium was demolished in 1994. The foul poles and home plate from Arlington Stadium were moved to the new ballpark, along with some of the bleachers. The bleachers are currently painted green, but their original blue color is occasionally visible in spots where the green paint has chipped. Home plate was inserted into place at the Ballpark in Arlington by Tom Schieffer, Richard Greene (then mayor of Arlington), Tom Vandergriff (former mayor responsible for bringing the team to Arlington, and George W. Bush (then team part-owner). 

 

Greene's Hill

220px-Greeneshill.jpg
magnify-clip.png
Globe Life Park in Arlington in 2006, with Greene's Hill in center field.

Greene's Hill is a sloped section of turf located behind the center field fence at the home field of the ballpark. The Hill serves as a batter's eye, providing a contrasting background behind the pitchers which enables hitters to more easily see the baseball after the pitcher's release. "Greene's Hill" was originally designed as a picnic area for fans but the Rangers have never initiated this policy. The hill was named after former Arlington mayor Richard Greene in November 1997.

 

By the way, credit Greene as the first one to say:"Arlington is nobody's damn suburb!"

 

 

 

Yeah, all of that is what I was talking about when I said that he knows about actions over words. Instead of bitching and moaning about what he thinks is a lack of respect for Arlington in the paper, he should do something about it, like he did when he was mayor. Or just stop worrying about it. Begging for attention in a column does nothing for Arlington's image.

 

 

What I find a little ironic is the timing of the opinion piece considering how much Arlington's profile has risen in the past few years, particularly with the Super Bowl and Final Four, and the enormous national exposure it's received lately. I hear way more people around Texas and outside of Texas talking about Arlington than ever before, some even talking about how they specifically consider Arlington when looking at places in Texas (or "around Dallas") to live.

 

 

Having re-read Greene's opinion piece, I can't say I blame him for being upset by national news and sports media commentators who carelessly label whatever major event occurring in Arlington as "Dallas" or "North Texas."  That was Greene's primary beef.  His secondary beef, I believe, was that more national recognition of Arlington as a "American dream city" is needed.  I remember how proud Fort Worthians were when our city received the "All America City" award back in 1964.

 

I think the identity issue is exacerbated when the major sports arenas are called "Globe Life" or "AT&T" instead of including the name Arlington,  Didn't we in FW feel frustrated when a major NASCAR arena was called "Texas Motor Speedway" and not "Fort Worth Motor Speedway"?   When other cities on the NASCAR circuit have a speedway named after them (e.gs., "Atlanta Speedway" and "Daytona Speedway")?
 

 

"Redirected"

 

:wub:  Arlington.



#20 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:57 PM

I'll continue the conversation here.

 

Having re-read Greene's opinion piece, I can't say I blame him for being upset by national news and sports media commentators who carelessly label whatever major event occurring in Arlington as "Dallas" or "North Texas."  That was Greene's primary beef.  His secondary beef, I believe, was that more national recognition of Arlington as a "American dream city" is needed.  I remember how proud Fort Worthians were when our city received the "All America City" award back in 1964.

 

I think the identity issue is exacerbated when the major sports arenas are called "Globe Life" or "AT&T" instead of including the name Arlington,  Didn't we in FW feel frustrated when a major NASCAR arena was called "Texas Motor Speedway" and not "Fort Worth Motor Speedway"?   When other cities on the NASCAR circuit have a speedway named after them (e.gs., "Atlanta Speedway" and "Daytona Speedway")?
 

 

Big difference between Fort Worth and Arlington: Fort Worth is a metro anchor, and Arlington is a suburb of that (and another) metro anchor.

 

Arlington needs to learn it's place. It is a SUBURB, not a metro anchor / major city. Arlington's growth was the result of Fort Worth and Dallas, and it should expect to be called either of those cities. It's cities like Arlington that make it hard for us to convince others that Fort Worth is a metro anchor.

 

Arlington does not have a central business district full of large office buildings, does not have suburbs that revolve arould it, and would not exist as it is without the metro anchor(s) that it revolves around.

 

Oh, and many tracks named after major metro anchors are located in their suburbs/satellites:

Charlotte Motor Speedway is in the Charlotte suburb of Concord,

Atlanta Motor Speedway is in the Atlanta satellite of Hampton,

Chicagoland Speedway is in the Chicago satellite of Joliet,

Phoenix Int'l Raceway is in the Phoenix suburb of Avondale, etc.

 . . .

The Dallas Cowboys play in the Dallas suburb of Arlington.

 . . .

Dallas/Fort Worth Int'l Airport is in the Dallas/Fort Worth suburbs of Grapevine, Euless, Irving, and Coppell.


- Dylan


#21 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 14 July 2014 - 06:34 PM

My response in the Arlington thread:

 

http://www.fortworth...owtopic=973&hl=

 

Might be a good idea to move over there since this is a Fort Worth thread.


- Dylan


#22 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,570 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 14 July 2014 - 07:54 PM

So this is just a matter of labels. Arlington needs to accept an arbitrary, subjective label so that Fort Worth can be better suited for another arbitrary, subjective label.

#23 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 14 July 2014 - 09:04 PM

The labels I applied are not random arbitrary labels. Arlington grew as a direct result of Fort Worth and Dallas (in other words, is a suburb), does not have a central business district (in other words, is not a major anchor), and does not have suburbs since it is a suburb.

 

Most metros have one and only one major anchor. It is difficult enough to convince people that the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex is a rare exception with two major anchors. When you lie and tell people that there are three major anchors, people will give up and stick to their one anchor idealogy, ignoring the fact that Fort Worth has a central business district and suburbs that grew from it (like Arlington).


- Dylan


#24 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,570 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 14 July 2014 - 11:13 PM

I didn't say "random". I said "subjective".

And your second paragraph is some awesome hyperbole. I have a hard time believing that this is that important. Why can't we just be happy with Fort Worth being the best Fort Worth it can be and let Arlington be happy being the best Arlington it can be?

#25 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,895 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 15 July 2014 - 09:21 AM

Arlington needs to learn it's place.

 

Arlington does not have a central business district full of large office buildings, does not have suburbs that revolve arould it, and would not exist as it is without the metro anchor(s) that it revolves around.

 

PAS -

 

The philosophical premise of "self-existence" or noncontigent existence flies int the face of your argument.  The fact that Arlington goes back at least to 1841 and that it was already established before the invention of the automobile which is the fundamental ingredient to create a suburb; this too removes the floor of your argument.

 

For the record:

 

 A. Arlington, in fact, does have a central business district of large office buildings;

 B. Dalworthington Gardens is an Arlington suburb

 

The fact that Jupiter has 1,321 times the volume and 66 more moons than has Earth, nonethless, both are planets.

 

In a court of law,  my hunch is that your statements would be found factually incorrect and you would lose.



#26 urbancowboy

urbancowboy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 113 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Was Philly, now Houston
  • Interests:Sustainable, Livable, Urbanism

Posted 15 July 2014 - 05:57 PM


Arlington needs to learn it's place.
 
Arlington does not have a central business district full of large office buildings, does not have suburbs that revolve arould it, and would not exist as it is without the metro anchor(s) that it revolves around.

 
PAS -
 
The philosophical premise of "self-existence" or noncontigent existence flies int the face of your argument.  The fact that Arlington goes back at least to 1841 and that it was already established before the invention of the automobile which is the fundamental ingredient to create a suburb; this too removes the floor of your argument.
 
For the record:
 
 A. Arlington, in fact, does have a central business district of large office buildings;
 B. Dalworthington Gardens is an Arlington suburb
 
The fact that Jupiter has 1,321 times the volume and 66 more moons than has Earth, nonethless, both are planets.
 
In a court of law,  my hunch is that your statements would be found factually incorrect and you would lose.
I would say Arlington does have vestiges of a downtown which they are actively trying to revitalize but it's hardly recognizable and isn't in the same league of a Bellvue, Tempe, or Pasadena, or even Grapevine. It is getting better though.

Dalworthington Gardens was developed through the PWA and is there more so because of the availability of the rural landscape and proximity to the two big cities. I wouldn't call it a suburb of Arlington but an enclave.

#27 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 15 July 2014 - 09:58 PM

 

Arlington needs to learn it's place.

 

Arlington does not have a central business district full of large office buildings, does not have suburbs that revolve arould it, and would not exist as it is without the metro anchor(s) that it revolves around.

 

PAS -

 

The philosophical premise of "self-existence" or noncontigent existence flies int the face of your argument.  The fact that Arlington goes back at least to 1841 and that it was already established before the invention of the automobile which is the fundamental ingredient to create a suburb; this too removes the floor of your argument.

 

For the record:

 

 A. Arlington, in fact, does have a central business district of large office buildings;

 B. Dalworthington Gardens is an Arlington suburb

 

The fact that Jupiter has 1,321 times the volume and 66 more moons than has Earth, nonethless, both are planets.

 

In a court of law,  my hunch is that your statements would be found factually incorrect and you would lose.

 

 

Yes, Arlington was a town back in the mid 1800s... just like dozens of other Tarrant County towns that are now suburbs of Fort Worth (and Dallas). Arlington may go back to the mid 1800s, but it would not be nearly as large if not for Fort Worth and Dallas.

 

Arlington has some office buildings, but it does not have a central business district packed full of offices.

 

Dalworthington Gardens is a Fort Worth suburb.

 

All cities in the metroplex are either suburbs or satellites of Fort Worth and/or Dallas, hence the name Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

On a side note, I find it real funny that that just a few years ago, Arlington voted to pay $325 million in taxes to be home of the DALLAS Cowboys, yet now they don't want to be associated with Dallas. :laugh:


- Dylan


#28 gdvanc

gdvanc

    Elite Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 740 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Arlington

Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:25 AM

So Arlington is a suburb. Being a suburb does not require a city to slink anonymously into the shadows of its larger neighbors. It isn't difficult to find cities that are well-known despite being "mere suburbs": Cambridge, MA. Anaheim, CA. Bellevue, WA.

 

Being recognized for what you are or what you have does not require you to be the anchor of your MSA or to have a CBD.

 

If Fort Worth's ability to convince people that it is a major city requires Arlington to "learn it's place", then Fort Worth should probably just give up the fight. Personally I don't think Fort Worth needs Arlington's cooperation, although any effort to get people to stop calling this place "Dallas" or "Dallas area" is awesome as far as I'm concerned.



#29 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 17 July 2014 - 07:26 PM

The cities you listed are usually associated with their metro anchor. Based on the Arlington article, it sounds like Arlington does not want to be associated with its metro anchor(s). That worries me, because if Arlington tries to do the same things as Fort Worth to seperate itself as Dallas, lazy people who know Arlington is a suburb but don't understand that Fort Worth is a metro anchor may lump Fort Worth and Arlington together as "Dallas area showoff suburbs."

 

 

As for what this metro area should be called, it should always be the "Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex" for its two metro anchors.


- Dylan


#30 McHand

McHand

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Shaw-Clarke
  • Interests:music, neighborhoods, kids, education, biking, politics, urbanism, food, friends, family

Posted 18 July 2014 - 03:43 PM

A little anecdote:  

 

I spent the first 11 years of my life in Fort Worth, and then we moved to Lovelady in the piney woods of East Texas (I got back as fast as I could).  In my new school, classmates would talk about when they went to "Six Flags in Dallas" and it drove me up a wall!  As we know, they are most definitely not the same city.

Perception of a place by outsiders means a lot.  If Arlington wants people to know it as Arlington, it absolutely should strive to do that.  Just like we want to be Fort Worth, and not Dallas/Fort Worth.


Voice & Guitars in The Crystal Furs
Elementary Music Specialist, FWISD

Texas Wesleyan 2015
Shaw-Clarke NA 


#31 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 19 July 2014 - 12:33 AM

But Arlington is a suburb, and Fort Worth a metro anchor. Big difference.

 

As I said earlier, suburbs should expect to be called the metro anchor(s) they revolve around. Suburbs like Arlington should not be treated like metro anchors. Our Six Flags location should be known as Dallas/Fort Worth to people outside of the metroplex.


- Dylan


#32 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,895 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 19 July 2014 - 07:09 AM

But Arlington is a suburb, and Fort Worth a metro anchor. Big difference.

 

As I said earlier, suburbs should expect to be called the metro anchor(s) they revolve around. Suburbs like Arlington should not be treated like metro anchors. Our Six Flags location should be known as Dallas/Fort Worth to people outside of the metroplex.

 

This is one of the strangest arguments I come across in a long time. :glare:



#33 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,560 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 04 December 2014 - 10:55 AM

Arlington's downtown library comes down, a 5-story mixed-use "Dallas Donut" development goes in:

 

http://www.star-tele...evelopment.html

 

The city will retain ownership of the land and grant a long-term lease to the developers, and will also own the parking garage in the middle. This property fronts Abram Street on the south, which is poised to be rebuilt as a centerpiece of A-Town's downtown.

 

edit: thanks JBB, link fixed



#34 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,570 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 04 December 2014 - 11:32 AM

Your link is a little wonky: http://www.star-tele...evelopment.html

That's pretty sharp looking. Arlington has managed to cut out a little niche of semi-local chain restaurants in their central area: Babe's, Mellow Mushroom (not local obviously), Fuzzy's, Twisted Root, Grease Monkey, Flying Fish.

#35 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 04 December 2014 - 06:35 PM

Wow, that does look like a really nice building! :) Congrats to America's dream suburb; Arlington will look more like a town with this.


- Dylan


#36 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 04 December 2014 - 09:59 PM

Good stuff. Get a few contiguous blocks of those "Donuts", maybe centered around Levitt Pavilion, and you'll get yourself a great little downtown. I think it will be very popular.

#37 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,560 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 14 December 2014 - 06:18 PM

A long time coming, but Arlington is looking to issue a RFP for a new convention-quality hotel to complement an expanded convention center:

 

http://www.star-tele...cle4356162.html

 

The city staff rightly recognizes that the city is losing potential revenue from people staying in "surrounding cities" while attending games or visiting another of A-Town's attractions. The Arlington Convention Center is pretty much walking distance to the football stadium and the baseball park, and easy shuttle-distance to the front gate of Six Flags and Hurricane Harbor. At some point there may be a need for another hotel on some of the vacant property adjacent to Johnson Creek between the stadiums (stadi?)



#38 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,560 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 14 June 2015 - 09:46 AM

Newly-elected Fort Worth City Council Member Cary Moon heads a group that has purchased the Historic Arlington Music Hall and adjoining property. The former Arlington Theater is located right downtown at Division (historic Highway 80) and Center Street. Interesting set of plans for the properties, and a track record to back them up:

 

http://www.star-tele...le23784244.html

 

It would be good to see Moon and associates target some new development in some of the historic areas of Northside Fort Worth as well...



#39 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,928 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 14 June 2015 - 11:10 AM

RD, that would be nice to see them invest in Fort Worth.



#40 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 24 June 2015 - 04:20 AM

A look at the new Library, 

 

11060160_844670908921783_208951605689735

 

11406553_844670905588450_346802461424070



#41 jsfslls

jsfslls

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West 7th

Posted 06 July 2015 - 08:25 AM

The I30/360 Interchange is all good to go to begin construction next year.

 

"When the Interstate 30 interchange with Texas 360 is rebuilt beginning next year, it will become one of the biggest, most intricate highway intersections in North Texas."

 

S-T Article: http://www.star-tele...le26540206.html

 

TxDOT Project Overview: http://ftp.dot.state...tw/overview.pdf

 

Looks like it's going to be completed around 2018-2019



#42 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,321 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:23 AM

Arlington Commons broke ground recently. Over 1,000 units are planned. Relatively urban looking design, Arlington doing some nice things. 

 

http://www.virtualbx...on-commons.html



#43 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 28 February 2016 - 05:45 AM

Looks nice, but why build an urban, pedestrian-friendly apartment complex in the middle of boring suburbia where there's no transit?


- Dylan


#44 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,560 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 28 February 2016 - 09:51 AM

Looks nice, but why build an urban, pedestrian-friendly apartment complex in the middle of boring suburbia where there's no transit?

 

Chicken or egg?



#45 elpingüino

elpingüino

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 320 posts

Posted 26 December 2017 - 09:50 PM

Arlington Commons broke ground recently. Over 1,000 units are planned. Relatively urban looking design, Arlington doing some nice things. 
 
http://www.virtualbx...on-commons.html


The front page of today's Star-Telegram had a big update about Arlington Commons.

"How luxury apartments with really cool views could revive an Arlington neighborhood" http://www.star-tele...e191585539.html

Opening in April, 48 tenants already booked.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users