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Al Hayne Memorial


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#1 fwfrog

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Posted 26 March 2005 - 11:59 AM

I've always been a fan of the little monument on Lancaster (near the T&P station) honoring the hero of the Texas Spring Palace Fire -- Al Hayne.

(see http://tinyurl.com/5y5eu for the story)

It's sort of a forgotten monument, in a poor location for visitors to take much notice.

Anyway... I'd suggested tying the Al Hayne story into our Easter sermon at church. Our pastor loved the idea, so we've put together a little Al Hayne tribute this Sunday. On the monument, it reads, "He Died So That Others Might Live" -- a perfect segue to the Easter message.

For any history buffs interested in checking it out (or for those looking for someplace non-stuffy to worship tomorrow), you're invited!

http://www.keystonechurch.com

#2 seurto

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 11:05 AM

I have had great interest and a soft spot in my heart for the Al Hayne monument after I discovered it many years ago. I'd passed it a million times and finally stopped to look at it. This was before the refurbished it a few years ago. I was very intriged by the whole Texas Spring Palace story and did a lot of reading and studying on the subject. I think it is a fascinating little piece of FW History that is very sadly neglected. For the size and notoriety of the event when it happened to almost complete obscurity is really a shame. If nothing else, it could make a great movie.

#3 renamerusk

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 11:58 AM

Why not name the proposed CC Hotel the "Texas Spring Palace".

"Keep Fort Worth Folksy!"

#4 fwfrog

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 01:02 PM

Good idea. It'd be nice if, somehow, somewhere... they could incorporate a little bit of the architecture from the original building into something else. A very subtle tribute...

By the way... the video tribute to Al Hayne went quite well on Sunday!

Why not name the proposed CC Hotel the "Texas Spring Palace".

"Keep Fort Worth Folksy!"

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#5 seurto

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 01:36 PM

Good idea.  It'd be nice if, somehow, somewhere... they could incorporate a little bit of the architecture from the original building into something else.  A very subtle tribute...

By the way... the video tribute to Al Hayne went quite well on Sunday!

Why not name the proposed CC Hotel the "Texas Spring Palace".

"Keep Fort Worth Folksy!"

View Post

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I think the hotel name is a great idea; I think incorportating a little of the architectural style would be cool, tho I doubt anyone would go for it. I'm glad to hear the presentation did well; it sounded as though there was a good connection there.

#6 fwfrog

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 09:57 PM

[/quote]I'm glad to hear the presentation did well; it sounded as though there was a good connection there.[/quote]

I figured if anyone would truly appreciate the analogy, it would be my fellow history buffs on this board :cheez:

#7 fwfrog

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 04:02 PM

The Al Hayne tribute video is now online. If anyone's interested, check it out @

http://www.keystonec....com/video.html

#8 safly

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 10:45 PM

Nice short there on Al Hayne. I must admit that this SHOULD be a story worth sharing to all in regards to one of the TRUE treasures of Fort Worths history. I certainly hope the memorial gets some much needed attention for all to see, for years to come. I will do my darndest to get some media behind it, perhaps tie it in with the latest of FW renovations, the TNP Building. There HAS to be a charity of sorts in his honor. Right?

Good job FWFROG. I know I had seen those pics of the burning building from somehwere, maybe on some other thread or in a museum here in town. Anyhow great story, vid, and way to use that ColdPlay track.

I HAD NO IDEA.
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
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#9 ramjet

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 04:21 PM

Always thought this was an interesting piece of Fort Worth history. Does anyone know where the Texas Spring Palace was located?

#10 pelligrini

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 05:10 PM

QUOTE
The location selected was along the Texas & Pacific Railway tracks at the foot of Fort Worth's Main Street.


http://www.rootsweb....pringpalace.htm

Erik France


#11 RD Milhollin

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 05:11 PM

QUOTE(ramjet @ Nov 7 2007, 04:21 PM) View Post

Always thought this was an interesting piece of Fort Worth history. Does anyone know where the Texas Spring Palace was located?


I have always been under the impression it stood where the T&P Station is today.

#12 pelligrini

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 05:15 PM

I recall hearing the same thing too. Here's another location. Same area though.

QUOTE
The city's central post office and adjacent railroad yards now occupy the Spring Palace site.

http://www.tsha.utex...es/TT/lkt6.html

Erik France


#13 AndyN

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 07:52 PM

Amon Carter Museum: Bird's-eye Views of Texas - Fort Worth, 1891 (See Feature 2)
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#14 cbellomy

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 11:09 PM

Ty Cashion's Discovery of Ruby Schmidt's rare Spring Palace Photo



#15 seurto

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 07:36 AM

QUOTE(cbellomy @ Nov 8 2007, 01:09 AM) View Post

That is an amazing photo!! Thank you for showing that one. As I've said before about the Spring Palace story, I think it would make a good movie -- any indie film makers out there??

#16 cbellomy

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 08:17 AM

It occurs to me that if the city were to use a combination of Barnett Shale and TRV money to do it, a fireproof replica of the Spring Palace on the site of the old Frank Kent Ford/Cadillac dealership on the SE corner of Main and Lancaster would make a City Hall as important to future generations as the county Courthouse is to us.

Yeah, I'm daydreaming. But it's a nice thought.



#17 bhudson

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 09:53 AM

QUOTE(Prairie Pup @ Nov 7 2007, 05:11 PM) View Post

QUOTE(ramjet @ Nov 7 2007, 04:21 PM) View Post

Always thought this was an interesting piece of Fort Worth history. Does anyone know where the Texas Spring Palace was located?


I have always been under the impression it stood where the T&P Station is today.



Looking at AndyN's linked map, you can see the streets are (from south to north...) Broadway, Daggett, Jarvis, and South. South St looks like it is now Vickery at that location. So the Spring Palace is sitting roughly north of South (Vickery) and south of the RR, between S. Main and Jennings. Looking at satellite images, this location is partly industrial/park & ride, and partly I-30.

That is a wonderful map, missspelingz and all. Fun history lesson.

It looks like the memorial is being retained, with sidewalks and landscaping being improved.

#18 ramjet

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 10:00 AM

Thanks for posting all those great pics and renderings. I didn't think to look in the Jack White Collection. I found an old photo outlining the actual sight:

http://www.fortworth...ringpalace4.jpg

The Texas Spring Palace must have really been something. A Google search on the Web, Image, and Book sections turns up a lot of info - which is interesting since it is a structure from long ago and had such a short life...

#19 walton91

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 10:22 PM

While doing some Christmas shopping I was looking through a couple books of historical Ft Worth photos & postcards. Apparently the Al Hayne Memorial was originally a horse fountain. Maybe that's common Ft Worth knowledge but I'm new here so I thought it was interesting seeing horses taking a drink from the memorial. Since the whole area is getting a makeover it would be nice to see the memorial as a fountain again since it's in a nice little green patch. Anyway I was thinking how quite unusual it is to see a monument to a "regular citizen", someone who isn't a city father or war hero, etc. I also got to thinking that since he was an Englishman, I wonder if there are any of his descendants in the UK or US who know about the memorial. It would be rather cool to find out that not only was your great-great-great grandfather a hero but a memorial exists to his memory.

#20 AndyN

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 01:09 AM

Perchance he was a Darwin Award winner and removed his self from the gene pool. Could be someone's gr-gr-gr-great Uncle, perhaps. Do we know his biographical details or just his heroic actions?
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#21 gdvanc

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 11:59 AM

Oh, Andy, you've gotta retract the Darwin Award statement, bro. There's a big difference between the ignominous ends met by the knuckleheads associated with that appellation and dying from running back into a burning building from which you've successfully escaped and lowering terrified women and children out of a second story window. Goodness, by the time he retrieved the last fainted woman, he was ablaze. He picked her up and leapt out of the window.


I know you didn't mean it that way, but I had to say something.


He was a 40 year old civil engineer visiting from England. It's possible he had managed to contribute his heroic genes to the deep end before his passing. I've been curious about how next-of-kin would have been notified. How was that handled in the late nineteenth century? Would we have just sent a brief notice to the consulate? Would his relatives have received anything more than notice that he had died in a fire? If he had a wife and children, would they have learned anything more than that?




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