Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

generic architecture question


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 lobster

lobster

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 447 posts
  • Location:downtown Fort Worth ;]

Posted 27 February 2005 - 11:18 PM

not sure what category this Q falls under, but I was wondering what the official industry term is for this type of industrial-looking flooring :

Posted Image

i know there's a specific name for it but i can't quite recall it...
thx
lobs

#2 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,425 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 27 February 2005 - 11:41 PM

I believe that is diamond plate.

#3 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 28 February 2005 - 12:04 AM

not sure what category this Q falls under, but I was wondering what the official industry term is for this type of industrial-looking flooring :

Posted Image

i know there's a specific name for it but i can't quite recall it...
thx
lobs

View Post



Looks to be an Aluminum TREAD PLATE design. Sometimes used for truck tool boxes, ranch truck F/R bumpers and etc,
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#4 lobster

lobster

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 447 posts
  • Location:downtown Fort Worth ;]

Posted 28 February 2005 - 12:32 AM

I believe that is diamond plate.

View Post


ah, that's it.. thanks

:wink:

#5 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 26 August 2017 - 12:03 PM

Unfortunately, NS T-5 zoning restricts buildings to 10-stories in most of the Near Southside unless you get a variance....Personally, I think 30+ stories would be too tall for this location. A 20-story tower on this land would be ideal....Anything taller would widen the downtown skyline too much.

 

 Two thoughts/questions come to mind - (1) who ceded this part of the City to Near South; (2) why would high rise (+>10 storey)  construction be detrimental to this immediate area that fronts I-30/ Downtown?

 

 As to (2) this was found about the return of investment and cost.  Note that Dallas is next to last in the cost of high rise construction.  If costs for this region is so low, it is [1] a demand issue for Fort Worth or[2] it is a regulatory issue.

 

High rise Construction Cost: http://evstudio.com/...fice-buildings/



#6 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 01 September 2017 - 08:49 PM

New construction is happening or is planned for fractions of a city block (640 Taylor/Frost; Residence Inn; AC Marriot and 901 Commerce).  Another partial and prime block still remains available (WT Waggoner) With many complete and empty blocks remaining undeveloped, are fractional block being developed because of their cost v. full blocks?   I think that it is only a matter of short time before W.T. Waggoner surface lot is developed.



#7 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,786 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 01 September 2017 - 09:14 PM

Renamerusk, in answer to your question a few days ago, I think through our discussion that it became apparent that the city only wanted high rise construction in Downtown, and they accomplished this through zoning regulations.  As for ceding the area to the Near Southside, I think that development organization uses either the railroad tracks or I-30 as their northern boundary.  They would be the group representing that area. 

 

I think the partial blocks are being developed because they are the only available vacant land in the core of downtown.  It also could be a cost factor, in that less than a block could be cheaper than a full block.  It could also be that other property owners don't want to sell.  Another factor here is that the AC Marriott and 901 Commerce are immediately adjacent to buildings designated as Historic and Cultural Landmarks (Kress Building and Winfield Place).



#8 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:29 PM

Thanks.

 

Your explanations of both questions is good for me.

 

Filling in these half and quarter blocks will create a nice density for Downtown. Today, Downtown is too scattered in my opinion.  There are very few views of Downtown that have a feel of density about them; the one that comes to mind is Downtown from Henderson/I30 where the buildings look to be in a clustered.

 

I also think that land cost is a key factor.  Not many half or quarter blocks left.  Developers will want to build on them rather soon.



#9 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,425 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:46 PM

Add the Hilton Garden Inn to the list of interesting partial block projects.

 

Many of the full block vacant lots are occupied by parking and likely more valuable in that use than the smaller blocks.  Of course that should change over time.

 

Count me as another fan of the density gained from the partial block projects.  



#10 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 02 September 2017 - 10:07 AM

Renamerusk, in answer to your question a few days ago, I think through our discussion that it became apparent that the city only wanted high rise construction in Downtown, and they accomplished this through zoning regulations....

 

 JTR, given the problem that the proposed hotel in Museum Place is having and that problem is very likely being studied by other hotel developers;  it could be that the zoning regulations are leading hotel developers to build in Downtown.  The zoning regulations may be doing exactly what you are suggesting.  Downtown is transitioning; it is becoming relevant again in a different way.  The loss of white collar jobs is being replaced with the influx of clean tourism and housing.

 

About the proposed hotel in Museum Place, maybe Hotel Group of America can do a joint venture with Sundance Square by developing their boutique hotel on the H/T/5/6 Block that Sundance Square is planning.



#11 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,786 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 03 September 2017 - 10:51 AM

As far as hotels downtown are concerned, I think the reason that the developers are interested in downtown is that the market is dictating this.  The developers are seeing that the hotel market is underserved and they are stepping in to provide a need and make some money.  Also, I'm pretty sure that the information released that downtown is 1,000 rooms short has some influence on this.  The Chamber of Commerce, the City, and other organizations are probably courting hotel developers to build these rooms.



#12 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:02 AM

As far as hotels downtown are concerned, I think the reason that the developers are interested in downtown is that the market is dictating this.  The developers are seeing that the hotel market is underserved and they are stepping in to provide a need and make some money.  Also, I'm pretty sure that the information released that downtown is 1,000 rooms short has some influence on this.  The Chamber of Commerce, the City, and other organizations are probably courting hotel developers to build these rooms.

 

 JTR, I picked up on your zoning regulations angle and take it as a long term strategy by the City to concentrate major hotels in the Downtown Core.  The benefit of the concentration is that it will work in hand with the future expansion of the Convention Center and possibly reducing the need for a public/private hotel project. It could be a sound and effective strategy if viewed through those lenses. 

 

Downtown transitioning to a Res/Hosp/Tour district (CTD) is further enhanced by TexRail.



#13 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:15 PM

.....Moving on to the two Sundance Square Towers, those are iconic Paul Rudolph buildings.  I feel that changing the curtain wall would destroy their modernist design.  Stringing color-changing LED lights on the buildings wouldn't do much for me because the current lights are built into the building's curtain wall system.  If any changes are made, the existing lights should be retrofitted.  That may not be able to be done since they were designed in the 1970's and completed in the early 1980's. 

 

  The fact that the SST are iconic Paul Rudolph buildings were brought to my attention recently; and that he was considered a master in the Modernistic/Brutalist School of Architecture.  His work has an equal number of admirers and critics.  Rudolph's building are often the subject of demolition or modification.  As a genre, modernistic buildings with few exceptions become un-modern (word manufacturing   :swg:  ); in other words , they do not age as well as other architectural periods.

 

In 1980, the SST were modern with a future forward appeal, but the 1980's having seen its time like disco, is over. SST always seemed strange with open arches and exposed escalators. It gives me the feeling of a building on stilts. Compare Sinclair Building to SST; and how timeless the Sinclair is now 8 decades later.

 

Perhaps changing the curtain wall is unrealistic, but adding an illuminated crown, dome or a band of lights would go alone way in enhancing the Skyline.

 

I will throw this in for measure, a Fort Worth/Bass(Sundance Square) joint effort -

 

https://www.dallasne...ing-rights-deal



#14 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 13 September 2017 - 09:29 PM

Moving on to the two Sundance Square Towers, those are iconic Paul Rudolph buildings.  I feel that changing the curtain wall would destroy their modernist design.  Stringing color-changing LED lights on the buildings wouldn't do much for me because the current lights are built into the building's curtain wall system.  If any changes are made, the existing lights should be retrofitted.  That may not be able to be done since they were designed in the 1970's and completed in the early 1980's. 

 

Was Rudolph an angry man?

 

The more that I see the pair of Rudolph SST the more that I find their brutalism wears upon my sensitivity.  If Rudolph's goal was to show the  ugly side of life, then I think he has made an long lasting punch to our collective gut and the skyline of Fort Worth.   I understand that Picasso was a genius but I have to admit that some of his work, a lot of his work, does not come across easily for me.



#15 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,786 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 14 September 2017 - 09:24 AM

I don't know about Rudolph's personal life. I do know that his works are either loved or hated by other architects and critics. I was never a big fan of his work. Rudolph has actually done two other buildings in the city. One is at TCU, and the other is a private residence.

My firm, Halbach-Dietz has done interiors inside the two towers since they were constructed, and over the years, I have come to appreciate them more. The two towers are probably some of the best examples of his commercial work. I believe they are his only skyscrapers and they should be preserved as they are now, so that when they become 50 years old, they would be eligible for historic designations.

You mentioned earlier about putting a crown on top, or changing the roofline of the buildings. I would be against this idea because the multi-levels of the roof was a part of the overall starting and stopping of the pinwheel projections. Those appendages start and stop on each progressive floor up, as you go through the building. All of that was intentionally designed. Covering them up would change the design intent.

#16 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 14 September 2017 - 08:28 PM

...You mentioned earlier about putting a crown on top, or changing the roofline of the buildings. I would be against this idea because the multi-levels of the roof was a part of the overall starting and stopping of the pinwheel projections. Those appendages start and stop on each progressive floor up, as you go through the building. All of that was intentionally designed. Covering them up would change the design intent.

 

 I haven't paid much attention to the proposed renovations planned for the street levels of the tower(s), but would it also be true that changing the way the buildings interact with the streets also changes the design intent?



#17 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,786 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 14 September 2017 - 08:39 PM

Yes, it could.  However, additions can be properly and tastefully done to where they could easily be removed for restoration, or they do very little change the design intent. 



#18 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 02 October 2017 - 03:01 PM

A couple I shot over the weekend

 

DLA9M6lUQAAgmTA.jpg

 

 It is hard to find a better looking, cleaner looking, more time enduring downtown building then 500 West 7th Street.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users