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Eclipse Fort Worth goes dark April 8, 2024

eclipes Fort Worth

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#1 Now in Denton

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 08:34 PM

Mr. Roberts wanted more disussions. So what the heck. Lets talk about when Fort Worth goes 100% totality in the dark on Monday April 8th 2024 ! Less than seven years from now ! I am a bit surprised our local media has not mentioned this ? From the maps I been seeing most of Fort Worth will be in the dark. Except for the northwest part of our city. Besides Fort Worth. San Antonio, Austin, and Dallas will go 100% in the dark.    



#2 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 09:27 PM

There was mention of our 2024 eclipse a couple of weeks ago on one of our local affiliates.

 

Not all of San Antonio and Austin will be in the path of totality. If the maps are accurate, downtown San Antonio will be just outside of the path.

 

https://www.timeandd...p/2024-april-8#


- Dylan


#3 Doohickie

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 07:08 AM

Neat.  I hadn't heard that.


My blog: Doohickie

#4 pelligrini

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 09:32 AM

First I've heard of it too, cool. ! Hope the weather will be nice on this future April day...


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#5 JBB

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 09:33 AM

I saw a local news mention of the 2024 eclipse in the last week. I just don't remember where.

I've lived here all of my 41 years and I can't recall if we've ever experienced a total solar eclipse. I can remember one in the 80's that was similar coverage to the one on Monday, but never total coverage.

#6 Now in Denton

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 10:42 AM

Type any serch engine for 2024 eclipes. Lots of maps showing the path for 2024. 



#7 Now in Denton

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 10:48 AM

https://en.wikipedia...f_April_8,_2024



#8 JBB

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 11:41 AM

PeopleAreStrange's link above has a lot of information and a good map.

#9 Austin55

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 02:03 PM

I suspect hotels, lodges and campsites in the Ozarks are already beginning to fill up with reservations.



#10 JBB

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 02:09 PM

I have a friend that's driving to St. Joseph, Missouri to see the totality.

#11 johnfwd

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 06:47 AM

What is the percentage of totality in North Texas on this eclipse today?

 

As we all know, April in our area is a bad month for clear skies on any given day.  



#12 JBB

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 07:27 AM

75% today. Pretty clear skies.

#13 Jeriat

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 12:36 PM

Although we didn't get the full effect, it was a strange experience.

The temperatures were cooler, it was eerily dim to where I didn't even need shades at high noon... 


7fwPZnE.png

 

8643298391_d47584a085_b.jpg


#14 johnfwd

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 12:42 PM

Some interesting photography and the light seemed to be dimmer, but, otherwise, a disappointment.  The experts said about 75% coverage in our area, but I don't think so.



#15 John T Roberts

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 01:13 PM

I could really tell that there was some serious dimming to the sun.  First of all, we looked at the eclipse from the start by projecting through a pinhole in a paper plate.  (We also did the cereal box viewer, but the plate method worked the best.)  From my architectural based opinion, I would say that the sun was about 75% covered.  There was also pretty serious dimming.  You noticed it a little bit whn you were out in direct sunlight, but I noticed it in several subtle and indirect ways.  My Transition Lenses in my glasses at the max point were nearly clear, when normally, they are very dark at 1 in the afternoon.  On the interior of our office, normally, the outdoor light coming in through the windows is the dominant light source.  A little after 1, the artificial light in the office was brighter than the light coming in from the windows.  Finally, we did the remodel on our building (the old Levitz Warehouse on Camp Bowie) and shortly before the maximum point of the eclipse, the outdoor lighting on the building turned on.  Shortly after the max, the lights turned off.  They are on a photocell.



#16 Austin55

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 01:54 PM

I think it's more interesting to think about than actually experience.

#17 JBB

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 01:59 PM

Some interesting photograph and the light seemed to be dimmer, but, otherwise, a disappointment.  The experts said about 75% coverage in our area, but I don't think so.

 

Lol.  This is the funniest thing I've read online in awhile.  You know it's not a meteorological prediction like a cold front or a hurricane, right?  There's a crap ton of astrophysics behind this.  That's how they're able to predict them hundreds of years out or document them hundreds of years in the past.  I don't think they missed the mark on this one.



#18 John T Roberts

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 02:48 PM

I don't think they missed the mark, either.  Johnfwd, it is currently brighter inside my office now with all of our windows in shade than it was at 1:09 this afternoon.  Everyone in the office noticed how our interior got brighter between 1 and 2:30 this afternoon.  Also, all of us architects and interior designers in our office agreed that the sun was about 75% covered by the moon.  Granted, we did not physically try to make such a measurement, but I'm betting our eyes are pretty good at judging percentages of objects. 

 

The one thing I regret is that I did not take a photograph of our projected image of the sun with my cell phone along with photographs of our office and our neighbors in the building looking at what we were doing.



#19 Austin55

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 03:00 PM

I'm curious how much light was actually blocked. 75% of the surface area was clearly not 75% of the light.
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#20 JBB

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 03:04 PM

I think a lot of people were expecting something more along the lines of early morning or dusk, but when the sun is higher in the sky like it was during the middle of eclipse, there's less atmosphere, haze, and ground clutter to filter out the sun.

 

I took my daughter out to Founder's Plaza at the airport so that we would have plenty to keep us occupied while we waited (we saw a 787, 747, and two 777's take off in the hour and a half we were there).  I'm a procrastinator, but I was finally able to pick up a pair of glasses from someone selling them on Next Door this morning.  We scored a 2nd pair from an airport rep that was passing them out.  There was a good crowd there that included a lot of photographers with nice equipment and a large contingent of airport security, police officers, and customs officers.  The police had the park shut off for awhile because the parking lot was full.

 

The thing that I noticed was how much less hot the direct sunlight was after around 12:45.  I had a Facebook friend that was on the Oregon coast and she posted some really incredible pictures.



#21 johnfwd

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:19 AM

Not intending to be lectured on astronomy about.solar eclipses, I was just disappointed because I thought that 75% coverage meant that we would experience some darkness, not just a serious dimming of light.  I guess I was over-expecting.  But, if we're in the path of a total solar eclipse in 2024 (if I'm still around, which I hope to be), there'll be no doubt about it!



#22 JBB

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 08:26 AM

I didn't mean to sound like I was lecturing. I think a lot of people confused 75% coverage of the sun for a 75% of dimming of the light.

#23 pelligrini

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 09:37 AM

I brought several welder glass filters to the office and was able to take a direct look at it. The thing that I was not expecting was all the crescent shaped points of light in between the shadows of the tree canopies. I was more impressed by that than anything else of the experience.


Erik France


#24 Now in Denton

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 11:45 AM

Not intending to be lectured on astronomy about.solar eclipses, I was just disappointed because I thought that 75% coverage meant that we would experience some darkness, not just a serious dimming of light.  I guess I was over-expecting.  But, if we're in the path of a total solar eclipse in 2024 (if I'm still around, which I hope to be), there'll be no doubt about it!

 

Lord knows I don't know everything. But if we get called out for something we don't know about what is the point in this forum ? You posted some of your interests. My hobbies are architecture, astronomy and tropical fish. I am no expert in any of them. But I can't get enough material reading about those subjects.

 

It is reasonable to expect a more darker 75% eclipse. The way I read about light from a eclipse. Is if you think of the sun as a recessed light and you put a book over it 50% 75% you can block out a lot of light. However think of the sun as more like a hanging light bulb. And put a book over it by even 95%. A lot of light will still shine. I hope this helps. https://eclipse2017....se-shadow-cones

 

Some fun facts. I went outside and I felt it was cooler. However Pet Delkus said the eclipse kept the Fort Worth-Dallas area cool all day by only 3 degrees . Some eclipse can drop temps by 20 degrees. The average duration of yesterdays eclipse was about 2 minutes. Some can last up to 7 minutes. But the Fort Worth 2024 eclipse will last over 4 minutes ! And gets shorter as it heads to Canada. But even in Canada it will last over three minutes. Texas is so lucky almost all the major cities are in the 2024 path. And people from all over the world will be coming. The only other major cities outside Texas will be Indianapolis, Cleveland and Buffalo. Those cities might still be dealing with snow. This sound like a good opportunity for Fort Worth new hotels.    



#25 renamerusk

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 02:09 PM

I didn't mean to sound like I was lecturing. I think a lot of people confused 75% coverage of the sun for a 75% of dimming of the light.

 

Yeah, but consider this -  25% of sunlight is highly illuminating; and to add,  it is seriously harmful to one's vision.



#26 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 01:16 PM

My dad and I were on the beach in Miami Beach for the partial eclipse. Direct sunlight quit feeling hot towards peak eclipse, even before clouds rolled in. Unfortunately, it didn't get nearly as dark as we expected. Clouds later on caused more darkness than the eclipse itself.

After peak eclipse, a bunch of clouds rolled in and we could see the crescent sun "racing" through them.

- Dylan





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