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downtown of yesteryear


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#1 johnfwd

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 12:09 PM

A friend posted this photo of a Fort Worth downtown of yesteryear.  Photo by Larry O'Neal.

 

 

 

https://scontent-dft...c94&oe=5A11CD68



#2 John T Roberts

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 12:26 PM

That was the skyline from the West Freeway sometime when I was a very small child.  I was born in October of 1957, and the CNB Clock was turned on the same month.  Since the clock is in place, I am assuming that the photo was taken in '57 or later.



#3 johnfwd

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 05:58 AM

The make/models of the few cars on the freeway suggest the time period.  Note the car in the foreground appears to be a '56 or "57 Chevrolet.  Also, what attracted my eye, besides the CNB clock, is what I believe to be the Public Market tower on the right.  Clarification on source of photo:  I meant to write that it was on my Facebook page, because that's where I spotted the photo; how it got there I haven't a clue. 



#4 elpingüino

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 06:44 AM

A full caption for this photo is in the Jack White Collection on Fort Worth Architecture:

 

1960CNBskyline.jpg



#5 rriojas71

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 08:18 PM

Like I have said on a few occasions.... man I wish the Medical Arts building had not been demolished.

#6 johnfwd

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 04:56 AM

My own bit of personal history about downtown Fort Worth, not too long ago.  But what a difference almost 20 years makes!  Back in 1999, it was nighttime and I walked alone along the entire northern span of downtown from about Pecan Street on the east side to north Henderson on the west. Talk about a "ghost town!"  Well, not quite, but it was eerily quiet.  Most of the new apartment complexes in and around that area had not yet been built.  This was before the Pier One (now Chesapeake) tower and the new Trinity Terrace towers were built. With all the new exciting developments now and into the next 20 years, this part of downtown will never be the same.

 

Twenty years ago the southern half of downtown was a "mess," in that the I-30 complex was not finished and bridge construction seemed at a standstill.  And not too long ago, also nighttime, I walked the southern half of downtown along Lancaster from Jones Street to Near Henderson.  This was prior to the new Pinnacle bank building.  More ghost-town feeling.  Development of the southern half is incomplete, particularly the T&P Warehouse, but at least it's starting to light up at night.



#7 RD Milhollin

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 12:18 AM

Maybe the absentee owners of the T&P Warehouse could be compelled to at least illuminate the facade of the building at night in order to help the surrounding area "light up at night". Even that might help some...






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