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Central Tourism District

Redefinding the CBD

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#101 renamerusk

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 08:16 PM

..... But, despite extensive discussion here from proponents and opponents of a downtown aimed at  tourists and permanent residents, it's still a central business district.  It  needs a strong office and retail market.  

 

Office/employment decisions should not be the purview of a city.  Businesses create and eliminate jobs; and as it has always been, controlling labor costs and striving for productivity is what businesses do by investing in technology and downsizing where ever the possibility present itself.  Cities create and invest in neighborhoods.  

 

The City is doing exactly as it should be doing - creating the environment for a vibrant Downtown Neighborhood - improvement to the CC; building a new arena; the beautification of the Downtown.  High among the thing that the City should be doing is taking steps to secure a sufficient supply of affordable housing in Downtown. A mixture consisting of a greater proportion of residential to employment will lessen the impact of future employment downsizing; sustain a healthy retail sector; and vibrant pedestrian and leisure sector.

 

That the hotel and residential markets are keen to come into Downtown, while at the same time, employment is leaving or remaining static is a sign that Fort Worth is headed in the correct direction.

 

Even though it still seems like a central business district, the future business of Downtown will be tourism, residential, hospitality and entertainment.



#102 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:54 AM

[SNIP]


 

That the hotel and residential markets are keen to come into Downtown, while at the same time, employment is leaving or remaining static is a sign that Fort Worth is headed in the correct direction.

 

Even though it still seems like a central business district, the future business of Downtown will be tourism, residential, hospitality and entertainment.

 

 

Why does downtown have to lose employment in order to gain residents and visitors? They are not mutually exclusive.

 

We're moving in the correct direction when it comes to hospitality, but we're stepping backwards when it comes to employment.


- Dylan


#103 tamtagon

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 06:05 AM

Office workers will increase in and around a downtown that's increasingly a better place to live as well as a more popular leisure destination. 



#104 johnfwd

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 07:15 AM

Office workers will increase in and around a downtown that's increasingly a better place to live as well as a more popular leisure destination. 

Often I see two sides of an argument.  I hope you're right about an increase in office workers downtown.  However, office workers don't just rent housing and show up as tourists...the point about CBD vs. CTD is that Class A Office buildings enjoy increased occupancy.  When that happens, it doesn't matter whether office workers live in or outside downtown.  Tourism, of course, is a different marketing strategy.

 

One trend away from Class A Office building occupancy downtown (unfortunately!) is for corporations to favor "horizontal" designed campuses.  Radio Shack locally was part of this trend when it preferred the low-rise river-front campus (that is now TCC's downtown campus).  Lately TXO/Exxon has moved from a high-rise downtown tower to a new low-rise corporate campus near Houston.

 

One underlying contributing factor for preference for low-rise corporate campuses is the trend away from the vertical hierarchical organization model (i.e., the big execs occupy the top floors and supporting cast on the lower floors).  This is not a new trend...the horizontal organization model began in the 1970s when U.S. corporations started to imitate the Japanese style of teamwork--that is to say, allowing the workers to participate with the big execs in the decision-making process.  A decentralization of a sort.  When a corporation adopts this model they prefer to be on the same structural plane as the workers.  Ergo, the low-rise corporate campus. 

 

There are other factors for low-rise corporate campuses--among them the pleasurable aesthetic of working closer to trees, flowers, and lakes.  Another factor is the desire to work in the suburbs rather than downtown because it's a less stressful environment and easier transportation access.  This doesn't mean that all corporate campuses will be low-rise structures.  There are exceptions (see Post#54).

 

The point I'm making against CBD is that this trend may be adverse to the high-rise office tower downtown.  It's only going to be more adverse in the future as land scarcity downtown results in vertical rather than horizontal building construction.



#105 renamerusk

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 09:39 AM

Office workers will increase in and around a downtown that's increasingly a better place to live as well as a more popular leisure destination. 

 

 I agree with your predication.  Young people living in Downtown will become an attractive labor market for employers and retailers.  People of all income brackets will dine in the restaurants and enjoy the entertainment of Downtown.  Tourists and conventioneers will add to the mixture. 

 

Downtown Fort Worth is the responsibility of the City.  The responsibility of Downtown can not be left to the office market alone.






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