Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The old wooden train trestle bridge


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 johnfwd

johnfwd

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,977 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:southwest
  • Interests:Running, bicycling, bowling, nightclub life, science, technology.

Posted 14 February 2017 - 07:50 AM

When I was little some of us kids would play in Boaz Park, and we would wander down a secluded path to the old wooden train trestle bridge that spans a narrow channel of Mary's Creek.  Every once in a while, as an adult, I take the same trek and sit on the rocks to admire this bridge.  How this old wood framework can still support a heavy freight train amazes me!  I also remember that kids should not play on the tracks at this particular location because a speeding train can come up suddenly and without warning.  The trestle has a history of tragedies that goes back 60 years or more.



#2 Ghost Writer in Disguise

Ghost Writer in Disguise

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridglea West

Posted 16 February 2017 - 08:48 PM

The wooden trestle is over Walnut Creek; Mary's Creek is spanned by the steel and concrete bridge a few hundred yards east. It's been a long time since I went close to either one but I remember stumps of old wooden pilings at both, remnants of earlier trestles.

 

I too have heard the story of the boys playing on the trestle when a train came. All but one jumped off into the creek. Within the last five or ten years there was also the man walking his dog. Neither of them made it...



#3 Ghost Writer in Disguise

Ghost Writer in Disguise

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridglea West

Posted 16 February 2017 - 08:56 PM

Not a tragedy but long, long ago there was also this: https://en.wikipedia...xas_to_Arkansas

http://hometownbyhandlebar.com/?p=6501



#4 Ghost Writer in Disguise

Ghost Writer in Disguise

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridglea West

Posted 17 February 2018 - 06:48 PM

Browsing through the Facebook group Fort Worth Memories and History, I found a photo of a S-T clipping about the November 1955 incident. Two ten year old boys, Jon Scott Haasch and James Albert Corbin, were killed on the Walnut Creek bridge west of the park beneath the 377 overpass. A third boy, younger brother to James, survived, apparently without injury. 



#5 arch-image

arch-image

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ft Worth
  • Interests:Historical preservation, zoning and growth issues, Serious but not professional photographer, been in construction and design since late 70's

Posted 18 February 2018 - 02:18 PM

Browsing through the Facebook group Fort worth Memories and History, I found a photo of a S-T clipping about the November 1955 incident. Two ten year old boys, Jon Scott Haasch and James Albert Corbin, were killed on the Walnut Creek bridge west of the park beneath the 377 overpass. A third boy, younger brother to James, survived, apparently without injury. 

 

Love old wooden bridges and was trying to locate this ... did you mean 287 instead of 377? 



#6 Ghost Writer in Disguise

Ghost Writer in Disguise

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 298 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridglea West

Posted 18 February 2018 - 11:05 PM

No, this is where 377 passes over UP (former T&P) and Walnut Creek north of Benbrook. I've been to that trestle before (and before I knew what happened there). It's one of three that pass over Walnut Creek. It and the one over where Aledo Road used to pass through the creek are concrete and steel affairs built in 1943 like the one over Mary's Creek to the east. The wooden trestle is in South Z. Boaz Park.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users