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The link between historic neighborhoods and minority owned enterprises


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#1 Austin55

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 12:03 PM

Fort Worth has one of the highest rates in the nation.

https://nextcity.org...ic-preservation

#2 Doohickie

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 12:26 PM

am I reading that right?  That 85% of Buffalo construction is older than 1967?  Wow.

 

As for the link between the two parameters.... what does it mean?  Is this a "good" metric, to say that minority owned businesses dominate older areas?  Is it "bad" in that it points to a higher level of segregation and discrimination, that people of color (and women) have a tougher time getting loans so they have to settle for more affordable, older neighborhoods?


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#3 RD Milhollin

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 10:05 AM

Is anyone going to comment positively that Fort Worth was reported separately from Dallas in this study?

 

I will!



#4 johnfwd

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 12:43 PM

am I reading that right?  That 85% of Buffalo construction is older than 1967?  Wow.

 

As for the link between the two parameters.... what does it mean?  Is this a "good" metric, to say that minority owned businesses dominate older areas?  Is it "bad" in that it points to a higher level of segregation and discrimination, that people of color (and women) have a tougher time getting loans so they have to settle for more affordable, older neighborhoods?

Food for thought, but the thrust of the article commenting on the report seems to point to the positive:  "According to the report, areas with only new buildings are less likely to promote entrepreneurial activity, density, and diversity than areas with a mixture of new and old."  If this is true, it would suggest that entrepreneurs would step in to invest in these neighborhoods to develop new commercial or housing projects or restore older buildings that happen to be historical.  We've been seeing that in parts of east Fort Worth lately.  And the author of the article seems to believe that "diversity" is a good thing. 

 

I get your point that patterns of segregation and discrimination may be suspected in the older neighborhoods having historical buildings (by definition) that consist predominantly of minority owned businesses.  Como comes readily to mind. 

 

[As to Fort Worth being listed separately than Dallas in this report, it's probably because the report author used the Census list of top 50 most populated cities in the U.S.]



#5 Russ Graham

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 02:01 PM

am I reading that right?  That 85% of Buffalo construction is older than 1967? 

 

It looks to me like it's saying 85% of Buffalo construction is older than 1945!



#6 Doohickie

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 02:10 PM

 

am I reading that right?  That 85% of Buffalo construction is older than 1967? 

 

It looks to me like it's saying 85% of Buffalo construction is older than 1945!

 

Oh man you're right!


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