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Mid-Century Modern Homes

Tanglewood

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#1 John T Roberts

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Posted 20 November 2016 - 05:42 PM

John Kent has a wonderful Op-Ed article in the Star-Telegram on the Mid-Century Modern Homes in Tanglewood.  There is also quite a bit of talk about them on Facebook.

 

Here's the link to the Star-Telegram article:

http://www.star-tele...e115770088.html

 



#2 Bonfire98A

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 11:59 AM

John Kent has a wonderful Op-Ed article in the Star-Telegram on the Mid-Century Modern Homes in Tanglewood.  There is also quite a bit of talk about them on Facebook.

 

Here's the link to the Star-Telegram article:

http://www.star-tele...e115770088.html

 

 

That was a good read -- MCM has always been high on my list.  In fact, I was greatly heartened by another article linked within, describing a new mid-century neighborhood going up in Austin (natch).  If the developer ever wanted to bring this concept to Tarrant County, I would be very excited about it and would definitely consider it (depending on location and price, of course).

 

More to the point of the article, though, it shows that building new houses in the old style isn't impossible, so if an old MCM house has to go down, at least the new owner has no excuse not to consider building something more appropriate to the neighborhood.  

 

I suppose if Tanglewood residents really wanted to preserve the neighborhood's architectural heritage, they could organize an HOA (if there isn't already one) with an architectural committee to approve new house designs.  Of course, that could turn out to be a nuclear option, given how tyrannical some HOAs can be.



#3 John T Roberts

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 01:28 PM

Tanglewood has a neighhborhood association, not a HOA.  They are fairly well organized, but when it comes to demolition, you really have to create either a local historic district, or multiple individual historic designations to protect the most significant homes.  This is why I am an advocate of local designation. 



#4 Austin55

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 02:05 PM

MCM is kinda in that weird phase where I don't think it's really old enough that most people consider it historic, but rather just a dated modern style. Most MCM architecture is rather unremarkable, but obviously significant to the time period.  I do think MCM is gaining a lot more respect, I know I've really come to love it over the more recent years.



#5 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 22 November 2016 - 12:56 AM

This is a widespread problem in Houston. Many perfectly good homes from the 1950s & 60s, including Mid-Century modern homes, are being dorn down and replaced with massive homes that don't fit the existing neighborhoods.


- Dylan


#6 Not Sure

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Posted 22 November 2016 - 05:12 AM

I love MCM homes, but I don't think the average person is willing to do without walk-in closets and big bathrooms in order to enjoy a particular aesthetic. Maybe a better way to put it is: I'd live without them, but my wife and daughters wouldn't. The idea that new MCM-inspired homes are being built is intriguing.




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