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Mixed-use project at Magnolia & May

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#1 Jimmy

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 10:11 PM

Hudgins Development is working on what is described as a "major multi-family" project at Magnolia & May (two blocks east of Hemphill) with ground-floor retail space on Magnolia.  A rendering can be viewed in THIS VIDEO.  Skip to the 4:35 mark.



#2 Austin55

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 10:44 PM

This looks awesome! A big change from the usual Magnolia developments.

 

DMHby8c.png

 

 

I also noticed this in the urban design commission so perhaps it could start work sooner than later.

 

 

UDC-16-04 Near Southside 315 W. Magnolia Avenue, 1321, 1325, 1327 May Street & 1320, 1326, 1330 St. Louis Avenue Owner/Agent: Magnolia Acquisitions, L.P./Jerry Lowery Requests a waiver from the following standards of the Near Southside Development Standards and Guidelines: • Parking Garage Location • Roadside Design Standards



#3 Austin55

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 03:55 PM

This could kick off in November, expected completion is June 2018. Cost is just under 30 Million, architect is Demarest.



#4 John T Roberts

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 08:19 PM

This looks pretty good.



#5 Austin55

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 07:50 PM

This could kick off in November, expected completion is June 2018. Cost is just under 30 Million, architect is Demarest.

 

 

Seems like it's on time, the old buildings on site are coming down. 



#6 johnfwd

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 06:51 AM

The design looks great, for a multi-family project.  If this is to include retail, I don't see it in the design.  Am I missing something?



#7 rriojas71

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 12:59 PM

The design looks great, for a multi-family project.  If this is to include retail, I don't see it in the design.  Am I missing something?


The video in Austin's initial post states that it will have "ground floor retail fronting Magnolia"

Very excited for this project. My hope is that it will help stretch Magnolia east past Hemphill and help S. Main extend past Rosedale.

#8 Doohickie

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 12:28 PM

My hope is that it will help stretch Magnolia east past Hemphill and help S. Main extend past Rosedale.


I think that's inevitable. I predict that as soon as S. Main is done, Bryan Avenue will come to be considered part of South Main Village almost immediately, and development will spread east into vacant lots between Bryan and the tracks in the stretch between Vickery and Rosedale (basically, the length of the rebuilt S. Main).  I think that area has the potential to dwarf the current Magnolia strip, especially since it can expand in two directions (i.e., east-west between Hemphill and the train tracks next to I-35, and north-south from Vickery to Magnolia).  Residences anywhere there will be easily bikeable to both Fairmount and downtown.  A streetcar through that stretch will really make it pop.  (And even if rails aren't laid down, they could do a Near Southside Molly the Trolley.)


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#9 Austin55

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 12:46 PM

Hemphill's intersection is kinda big & scary right now, probably a big reason why a lot of pedestrians don't want to cross to the east side.

#10 Doohickie

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 12:51 PM

Is it?  I don't think it is really.  I can see where people not familiar with the area would think so though.


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#11 renamerusk

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 01:42 PM

Hemphill's intersection is kinda big & scary right now, probably a big reason why a lot of pedestrians don't want to cross to the east side.

 

 Time for another round-a-bout. One there would be an equal opportunity scare for cars and pedestrians alike. :D



#12 Austin55

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 03:25 AM

Considering the push back of the proposed hotel also on Magnolia, I'm surprised nothing has been brought up in regards to this development. The design (in the only render I've been able to find in post #2) is quite bold, and it's only one floor shorter than the hotel, at 5 floors (with a 7 level garage). Perhaps this proposal has just been more under the radar? It's also further from the heart of Magnolia and has less historical context nearby, so that likely has something to do with it. 



#13 Doohickie

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:29 AM

Anything east of Hemphill is "over there".


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#14 John T Roberts

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 10:25 AM

I'm sure it is the distance factor.  The hotel project on Magnolia actually borders the Fairmount/Southside Historic District boundaries.  The project at Magnolia and May is several blocks from the historic district boundary. 



#15 Doohickie

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 11:14 AM

Same idea.  I think Fairmounters in general see both sides of Magnolia as part of their neighborhood, but see Hemphill has a hard boundary.  East of Hemphill is clearly not Fairmount (yes, I know there is a delineated boundary at Magnolia as well, but people have embraced both sides of that street as part of Fairmount).


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#16 Urbndwlr

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 05:35 PM

My prediction:  as the "holes" get filled in, one by one on Magnolia between Hemphill and South Main, it will feel more complete. 

Also, when South Main fully opens, more people will likely travel the path down Magnolia, then on to South Main - making it feel more like a continuous promenade (vehicular/cycling one - since is a lot of distance to walk).  The section of Magnolia between Hemphill and S. Main is also relatively short compared with 8th Ave to Hemphill, so there are not really a lot of sites left. 

 

Hudgins will bring apartments to one (or is it two?) of those I understand. 

And there will be continued smaller infill development like the limestone ones on Oleander/Jennings and behind St. Mary Catholic Church, which will gradually bring a more complete, organically developed feel to the neighborhood. 

 

Would be nice if JPS would fill in their lots with pedestrian friendly buildings.  Not sure their plans for those lots. 



#17 Doohickie

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:25 PM

My prediction:  as the "holes" get filled in, one by one on Magnolia between Hemphill and South Main, it will feel more complete. 

Also, when South Main fully opens, more people will likely travel the path down Magnolia, then on to South Main - making it feel more like a continuous promenade (vehicular/cycling one - since is a lot of distance to walk).  The section of Magnolia between Hemphill and S. Main is also relatively short compared with 8th Ave to Hemphill, so there are not really a lot of sites left. 

 

Hudgins will bring apartments to one (or is it two?) of those I understand. 

And there will be continued smaller infill development like the limestone ones on Oleander/Jennings and behind St. Mary Catholic Church, which will gradually bring a more complete, organically developed feel to the neighborhood. 

 

Would be nice if JPS would fill in their lots with pedestrian friendly buildings.  Not sure their plans for those lots. 

 

It's a very short bicycle ride.


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#18 Austin55

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:46 PM

Interestingly many of FW'S main corridors are the distance. Magnolia between 8th and Main, Main between Magnolia and Vickery, 7th between the river and University and Commerce between Lancaster and Belknap are all about the same distance, just under a mile.

#19 TexasPacific52

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 10:08 AM

not to be a killjoy but I'm a little skeptical of a building so close to JPS and the county morgue. You do realize that this project will be one block from the morgue that routinely stinks up the block during the summer time. Not to mention the large number of transients that camp out and sleep in the area. if you worked here at night and saw it for yourself you would be cautious also. I cant tell you how many times I've seen butt naked patients running out of the hospital with the police and security guards in hot pursuit. It's the County hospital, it gets crazy around here at night and on the weekends and you want to build something like this two blocks from it.???

-

Don't get me wrong, I welcome more restaurants and businesses in the area but high end multi story housing? I just don't know if it will really take off. Sure you will have some takers but I would think the price for such accommodations wouldn't be as high as else where.



#20 renamerusk

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 03:44 PM

not to be a killjoy but I'm a little skeptical of a building so close to JPS and the county morgue. You do realize that this project will be one block from the morgue that routinely stinks up the block during the summer time.....

 

 At the risk of side tracking this thread and for the one and only time that I would care to discuss this topic -

 

Could it be that the morgue had a A/C problem or some other mechanical failure that was promptly addressed? What has been the response given to you when you complain or ask for an explanation for the routine odor?

 

 This is a pretty damning statement.



#21 rriojas71

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 05:57 PM

I think projects like this help turn around blighted areas so hopefully that will be the case with this one. As far as the transients in the area that you have mentioned, that unfortunately is part of the urban landscape for many cities. I have lived in a few places with walkable urban neighborhoods and those problems persist no matter what is done. Those who don't want to see this won't be the ones renting here.

#22 Urbndwlr

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 10:40 PM

not to be a killjoy but I'm a little skeptical of a building so close to JPS and the county morgue. You do realize that this project will be one block from the morgue that routinely stinks up the block during the summer time. Not to mention the large number of transients that camp out and sleep in the area. if you worked here at night and saw it for yourself you would be cautious also. I cant tell you how many times I've seen butt naked patients running out of the hospital with the police and security guards in hot pursuit. It's the County hospital, it gets crazy around here at night and on the weekends and you want to build something like this two blocks from it.???

-

Don't get me wrong, I welcome more restaurants and businesses in the area but high end multi story housing? I just don't know if it will really take off. Sure you will have some takers but I would think the price for such accommodations wouldn't be as high as else where.

 

TexasPacific52, I think what you're talking about is zombie activity.  They apparently love morgues and are notoriously bad about loitering.   

 

 

 

Joking aside, I have never seen or smelled anything like what you described around that area.  I eat around there quite often at Fixture and Spice at lunch and dinner, inside and outside. 



#23 Austin55

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 12:06 PM

Bisnow has an article out which talks a bit about this building. It also lists the number of units as 238 which is the first I've seen for this. 34 units will be 465 sqft.

 

b0mcsxi.jpg



#24 johnfwd

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 08:20 AM

Not intending to venture into a philosophical argument about modern urban design and planning (another thread), but I note in passing this quoted excerpt from the Bisnow article cited in Post#23 above:

 

Cities and urban planners may have visions of urban and suburban multifamily projects that activate the street level with retail stores and food services, but those creating the projects do not relish the challenges of mixing retail and multifamily. 

 

Just a snide quip here...as these type projects have been going on here and elsewhere for many years I would think that architects would be used to them by now.



#25 Doohickie

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 09:25 AM

I really like that courtyard.  Looks like lots of nice spots for homeless folk to snooze when the winds blow.

 

 

Seriously, I kind of like that sunk-in look like what they used on the TCC campus downtown.


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#26 mmmdan

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 12:05 PM

Not intending to venture into a philosophical argument about modern urban design and planning (another thread), but I note in passing this quoted excerpt from the Bisnow article cited in Post#23 above:

 

Cities and urban planners may have visions of urban and suburban multifamily projects that activate the street level with retail stores and food services, but those creating the projects do not relish the challenges of mixing retail and multifamily. 

 

Just a snide quip here...as these type projects have been going on here and elsewhere for many years I would think that architects would be used to them by now.

 

I wonder if some of this has to do with financing that is available, and the different rules that have to be followed when developing something that is mixed use.  I can't imagine that it's that difficult to actually build something that is mixed use, it's more the zoning and financing.

 

Something along these lines: https://www.strongto...f-your-comunity



#27 renamerusk

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 10:22 PM

....Cities and urban planners may have visions of urban and suburban multifamily projects that activate the street level with retail stores and food services, but those creating the projects do not relish the challenges of mixing retail and multifamily. 

 

Just a snide quip here...as these type projects have been going on here and elsewhere for many years I would think that architects would be used to them by now.

 

 Yes, that is an odd point of view.  What does it mean?



#28 pelligrini

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 10:30 AM

 

....Cities and urban planners may have visions of urban and suburban multifamily projects that activate the street level with retail stores and food services, but those creating the projects do not relish the challenges of mixing retail and multifamily. 

 

Just a snide quip here...as these type projects have been going on here and elsewhere for many years I would think that architects would be used to them by now.

 

 Yes, that is an odd point of view.  What does it mean?

 

I think it is more of a comment on the developers, than the architects. A lot of developers know one or the other, residential or commercial. Getting the two to work in a building and on a particular site has its challenges, but it's not that hard. A developer actually wanting to do a true muli-use project is not a common occurrence.


Erik France


#29 Urbndwlr

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 12:55 PM

Good point and probably true.

Also, if you have really active restaurants on the ground floor and apartments above that share a garage, there can be some inconveniences for the apartment residents to get through the restaurant patron parking sections.   If they have separate entrances they could avoid but in compact projects that often could be hard to achieve. 

Also the ventilation of the kitchens - where do you vent them and how to manage the smell of food to keep from annoying residents. 

Its all possible and tons of precedent but still adds a layer of challenge (therefore expense) to overcome vs single use. 

 

In some cities where the City required ground floor retail space yet the market wasn't ready for it, you'll see lots of ground floor vacant space sitting around, which nobody wants.  That's a common argument and sometimes legitimate.



#30 pelligrini

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 09:45 AM

Parking and ventilation can be a challenge, but there are solutions. Just look at hotels that have a restaurant (or two) and bars. Most of the ones I have seen work out pretty well. I agree that big factor is the cost.

 

Structured parking, especially if it needs to go underground, can really drive up project costs. Some of the costs per parking space I've seen have been  very surprising.

 

It may be tough, maybe even impossible depending on their financial model, for some developers to sit on vacant commercial space. I don't think a city is totally wrong in planning and zoning for such uses. They are in it for the long run, a lot of developers just want to complete, stabilize and flip. 


Erik France


#31 renamerusk

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 11:36 AM

Underway!

 

http://www.fortworth...44335fe393.html



#32 Austin55

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 12:11 PM

I want to live here already.

#33 rriojas71

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 01:52 PM

Hudgins Companies developed a 22 story propert in Austin... I know the area is not zoned for a high rise, but I wish this was 22 stories or at least 15+. It's still a great project nonetheless.

#34 johnfwd

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 06:20 AM

With its size and complexity, this project will be a remarkable and welcome addition to the Magnolia neighborhood!



#35 Austin55

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 03:29 PM

Additional renderings

 

xAZxw1k.jpg

 

boprNae.jpg

 

ROYuQdf.jpg



#36 Austin55

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 04:12 PM

This one is starting to head up, the first few pieces of rebar framing for columns is going up. I'd assume this will be a concrete first floor with wood framing above like many similar big block apartments.



#37 rriojas71

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 02:53 PM

This one is starting to head up, the first few pieces of rebar framing for columns is going up. I'd assume this will be a concrete first floor with wood framing above like many similar big block apartments.


Yeah it seems that all the apartment complexes are built with concrete supports when the pool/public area is not on the ground floor. Broadstone @ 5th & Summit will have the 3rd floor pool deck and open space and because of this is seems to be taking forever to start the moving upwards. It feels like they have been at the same level of construction for the past 7-8 months; although I know that is not true.

#38 Austin55

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Posted Yesterday, 02:42 PM

This one has a tower crane going up soon.





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