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Great News for America

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#1 renamerusk

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 12:40 PM

In the past, largely in part to the United States' dependency on imported oil from troubled areas throughout the world,  our nation has been drawn into conflicts because of our energy needs.Its should give all of us some great relief that future presidents will not have deal with petro-politics

so directly.  For instance, oil producing nations relied almost exclusively on the US for protection. Their turmoils whip sawed the price of gasoline at the pump.  Well it is very refreshing to be in a position to let the oil producing nations do the fighting to resolve their own quite twisted differences. And so I am extremely happy that the US can be in the background instead of having to be in the foreground of the latest war on the Arabian Peninsula. Go USA!

 

http://www.fwbusines...fa1bea1570.html

 

http://cleanedge.com...Texas-Wind-Farm



#2 johnfwd

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 06:37 AM

Point well taken, except for the unfortunate fact that the United States (and the West) faces a Middle East obviously in great turmoil--for a variety of reasons, including the continuing loss of the oil-financed sheikdoms, kingdoms, and strongman dictatorships.  The "Arab Spring", we all thought at first, would be as non-bloody as 1989's populist revolt against the Soviet-stranglehold on East Europe Then religious sectarian violence, terrorism, and civil wars erupted.  I agree wholeheartedly that this not solely up to the U.S. to play the world's policeman in the Middle East.  The silver lining in this region may be the unification of state forces through the Arab League and other regional organizations replacing what the U.S. and NATO military have been doing there.  In the long long run, of course, these states need to do what we did over 200 years ago--adopt constitutions for parliamentary or representative democracy and the separation of church and state.



#3 RD Milhollin

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 10:25 AM

Texas takes a big step backward (any surprises?)

 

Big Energy scores as win as paid-for Texas legislators vote to end supports for clean, renewable energy development. If the program has indeed reached a "Mission Accomplished" phase as supporters claim, the programs should be extended and expanded to boost solar production in the state:

 

http://www.star-tele...le18552341.html



#4 renamerusk

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 03:04 PM

Texas takes a big step backward (any surprises?)...Big Energy scores as win as paid-for Texas legislators vote to end supports for clean, renewable energy development.....

 

 Upton Sinclair -

 

 "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it."



#5 renamerusk

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 10:21 AM

Saudi Arabia (SA) - "The road always lead back to The Kingdom when ever America is attacked - 9/11, and now San Bernardino, CA."

 

This is why I find President Obama's policies to downplay the once thought to be indispensable alliance with S.A.; to insist that the U.S. achieve energy independence through renewable and conservation; and, to keep American troops out of the ME so very and wisely encouraging.

 

I will and can not support any presidential candidate who would proposed sending American troops back in the ME, a cesspool of intolerance.

 

The following is just a sample of the many like-minded commentary regarding the duplicity of SA -

 

http://wrongologist....y-saudi-arabia/



#6 johnfwd

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:41 AM

Eventually, production of non-fossil fuels will supplant oil and gas production.  The Middle East feudal shiekdoms and monarchical royal families who prospered with petrol dollars at the expense of the poor and in the absence of a conventional middle class are going to be in trouble (if they aren't already).  They'll either return to pre-WWII nomadic countries or else create modern economies based on diversified industries, with a growing middle class, and regulated by a non-monarchical rule, maybe a parliamentary democracy.  How that will affect their hard-core Islamic culture and way of life, I don't know.



#7 renamerusk

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 12:18 PM

The disintegration of the ME is all very well as the region has manipulated us largely with our own help. .  We can not get the hell-out-of- there fast enough as for as I am concern.

 

It is very encouraging that generations much younger than my own feel and act less tethered to fossil fuel and its associated industries.  I am both proud and somewhat envious of them.






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