Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Reading through old threads


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,116 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 31 January 2015 - 07:31 AM

Sometimes you can find some entertaining stuff in these old things. Some quotes from the XTO tower thread after it was announced that it would be a parking lot. Most of theses comments are 9-10 years old.

 

 

 It's going to take a few more Sundance Squares to really put us on the map.\

 

I think today Sundance is the biggest thing putting FW on the map. You can see if ESPN and other advertising that it's certainly not our cultural district or Southside, for example. 

 

Sam, why can't Fort Worth one day be as hip (not hipper) than Austin? Sure we might not have one of the nation's largest universities to feed off of, or beautiful scenery, but we don't have to be hip in the same way as Austin. Austin hasn't been "cool" forever, and I'm pretty sure by today's standards FW would have been considered a more happening place pre-WWII. We're going to pass Austin soon and reclaim our 4th largest city in Texas title, and if that doesn't prompt us to start hippifying (heh) I don't know what will.

 

Well, Austin is now the essentially the hippest city in the country, and we aren't really on pass to pass it in size, especially in urban growth. Austin has exploded in the past decade. 

 

 

 

"YOU PEOPLE HAVE INSTANT GRATIFICATION ISSUES!"

View Post

 


A-freakin-MEN. Anyone who thinks this land will remain graced by parking for eternity is high.

 

Some things never change! 

 

 

And pigs will fly from Love Field to major destinations around the globe.

 

 

Well not the globe yet, but a bit more of the continent. 

 



#2 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 31 January 2015 - 06:20 PM

Yes, these old threads are interesting.



#3 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,437 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 31 January 2015 - 08:09 PM

Yeah, in 2005, it was pretty hard to imagine that the coming economic downturn would slam the brakes on things the way it did.



#4 Dismuke

Dismuke

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,038 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth
  • Interests:Late 19th/early 20th century history, popular culture architecture and music. Collecting 78 rpm records from the 1900 - 1930 era.

Posted 01 February 2015 - 04:26 PM

That's why I find it so amusing whenever I read assertions by various central planner types about how much population Fort Worth will have 30 years in the future or what the city will be like.  They don't know.  Nobody knows.  All one can do is project current trends forward.  But there are all sorts of things that are going on in the world around us which can be projected into the future with widely different outcomes.  Which current trend is dominant - and what's to say that it will remain so and that some other current trend won't eventually overtake it?  And who can anticipate all of the variables that might, at some point, come along and be so disruptive (for good or for bad) that all current trends are completely thrown off?

 

Such trends usually operate on the premise that Fort Worth will continue to grow.  But growth and increased prosperity is not an automatic given.  Look no further than Detroit or most other large cities in the upper Midwest and Northeast and, more recently, California.   We are not so special that our area is somehow exempt from a similar fate should we go down the same path that those cities have.  Indeed, a not so insignificant factor behind our success and growth is the result of businesses and job seekers fleeing the economic wreckage of those other parts of the country.  Maybe we will continue to attract such economic refugees.  Or maybe those other areas will hit bottom and reverse course out of desperate necessity and end up attracting economic growth that would otherwise have come our way.  Nobody knows.

 

Obviously the performance of our local economy is directly impacted by the performance of the national economy - and who on earth can predict where that is going to go?  For example, who in 1980 when the prime interest rate was 21.5 percent and inflation was 13 percent could predict that within a very few years we would be on the cusp of of a significant and sustained economic expansion?  And whenever the economy is doing well there is no shortage of voices operating on the assumption that the good times will continue indefinitely.

 

Who in 1945 could have predicted that within 30 years downtowns and central cities would decline and, in many locations, completely die?  And who in 1975 would predict that within 30 years those same areas would undergo a renaissance and become a magnet for people with higher incomes?   Who in 1985 would have predicted that 30 years later powerful local icons such as newspapers, television stations and shopping malls would all be considered dying industries and that the only question is not if but when the majority of them will become extinct and whether they will be able to morph into something else that is viable?

 

I remember having a discussion/debate with one of my teachers circa 1984 about the Soviet Union.  I argued that the Soviet Union was little more than a backward third world country with nuclear weapons.  I remembering some of my classmates thinking that what I said was completely bizarre and radical.  Had someone come along and told me that I was right and, not only that, but that the USSR would completely melt down and would no longer exist in seven years - I would have thought of them has having been completely nuts.  But that is exactly what happened.

 

When White Rock Lake opened in Dallas in 1911, it was touted as having taken care of Dallas' water needs for the next 100 years.  It proved insufficient in less than 20 years.

 

And remember all the talk of "peak oil" just a very few years ago?   Look at what has happened since.   Look at the economic collapse currently underway in backward petro-states such as Venezuela and Russia whose entire economies are largely controlled by authoritarian regimes that bought votes paid for on the premise that oil prices would remain high forever.  And if prices remain low long enough, you will see others making significant bets on the future based on the premise that prices will remain low forever.   Maybe they will.  Maybe they will go down even further and stay there. Or maybe they will bounce right back up to where they were.

 

Think of that next time so-called "experts" boldly assert what Fort Worth is going to be like in the year 2040.   The future rarely turns out the way we expected it to. One thing will remain a constant, however: at least when it comes to projecting the future, "conventional wisdom" and so-called "experts" will very frequently not just be wrong but utterly and completely wrong.


Radio Dismuke
1920s & 1930s Pop & Jazz
24-Hour Internet Radio
www.RadioDismuke.com


#5 B. F. MAUPIN

B. F. MAUPIN

    Newcomer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:2112 LEE AVENUE, FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Posted 08 February 2015 - 04:17 PM

I am grateful for DISMUKE s lengthy comments.  What Fort Worth really needs is another Amon G. Carter or a  B.B. Paddock.

Neither of these Guys were geniuses.  They were able to secure the Publics attention.....  B.F. MAUPIN ...

.



#6 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 08 February 2015 - 06:22 PM

I agree, B.F.  We need another Amon G. Carter.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users