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Elon Musk is teasing Texas again - Hyperloop


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#1 BlueMound

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 07:48 PM

Elon Musk says Texas is leading candidate for Hyperloop test track
http://arstechnica.c...ding-candidate/

#2 johnfwd

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Posted 15 June 2015 - 12:23 PM

Musk isn't teasing just Texas, but everyone else.  Hate to sound negative about this guy's visionary projects, but check out the CNBC article by Alan Boyle below.  Hyperloop  races?  For heaven's sake, either build the darn thing or shut up.  Reminds me of the fanciful but useless DARPA robot contests, the silly solar car races, and the non-existent air rocket racing.  Pardon my cynicism.

 

http://www.cnbc.com/id/102759795



#3 johnfwd

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 10:04 AM

Please forgive a detour from HSR discussion here, only because Hyperloop Technologies, Inc., appears to be serious in engineering at least a prototype hyperloop system and, within 3 years.  More so than Musk's vision talk.  The CBS News report on this is quite informative.

 

http://www.cbsnews.c...transportation/

 

The bottom line, whether it's Kitty Hawk, or this new concept (apologies to "Field of Dreams"):  If you build it, they will come.  But first you've got to build it and show that it works!



#4 johnfwd

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 01:03 PM

An update in this Popular Science article.  If the technology proves feasible, and the prototype demonstration is successful, will this be truly marketed?  There will be, I fear, a social inertia reaction.  What I mean is, will you and your wife (and baby daughter) want to sit in a pod to be hurled forward at hundreds of miles per hour?  Or maybe speed won't be felt, as riding in a high-speed train or jet is usually comfortable.  And if people with claustrophobia are squeamish about riding in an underground subway, would they embed themselves in an enclosed tube for long-distance travel?

 

http://www.msn.com/e...ocid=spartandhp



#5 johnfwd

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 05:23 AM

This may not be on our high-speed transit radar screen yet, but it appears to be making progress.

 

http://www.cnbc.com/...-ever-demo.html



#6 johnfwd

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 11:29 AM

An update on engineering efforts to bring this vision of a new revolutionary transportation technology into reality, in this case a test track is being constructed.  See this article from LiveScience.Com which appeared on the NBC News website.  I believe that testing of this new technology will determine its future feasibility from a technical perspective, at least.

 

http://www.nbcnews.c...-closer-n730611



#7 Austin55

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 08:52 PM

Here's the site which outlines some hyperloop plans in Texas including maps and renderings. Fort Worth is not included in the plans.

http://www.hyperloop-tx.com/

#8 johnfwd

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 12:11 PM

Thanks, Austin.  If this technology works and is marketable, at some point in the distant future urban planners are going to have to decide on whether this revolutionary form of mass transportation is going to augment or replace existing forms, most notably rail.  Suppose it will depend partly on whether it's cheaper to build and there's less right-of-way problems.  And, as I have stated before in this thread, whether people are willing to enclose themselves in a tube for an extended period of time.



#9 JBB

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 12:21 PM

Like on a subway? :)

I have far more confidence in this actually happening than any other willy-nilly high speed rail project on the board.

#10 johnfwd

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 04:38 AM

Like on a subway? :)

I have far more confidence in this actually happening than any other willy-nilly high speed rail project on the board.

Years ago I worked on a newspaper (Oklahoma) that had the old fashioned pneumonic tube delivery system.  The reporter would take his copy to the city desk for editing and the editor (after the final proofreading) would put the finished copy in a canister for travel in the tube to the copy setters and printers, located in the building's basement.  Believe it or not, at that time I wondered why people couldn't travel the same speedy way.



#11 mmmdan

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:17 AM

It worked on the Jetsons.



#12 Bonfire98A

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 01:11 PM

 

Like on a subway? :)

I have far more confidence in this actually happening than any other willy-nilly high speed rail project on the board.

Years ago I worked on a newspaper (Oklahoma) that had the old fashioned pneumonic tube delivery system.  The reporter would take his copy to the city desk for editing and the editor (after the final proofreading) would put the finished copy in a canister for travel in the tube to the copy setters and printers, located in the building's basement.  Believe it or not, at that time I wondered why people couldn't travel the same speedy way.

 

 

It works for cats....

 

https://www.theatlan...c-tubes/278629/



#13 Jeriat

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:59 PM

Anyone seen this yet? 

entry2665-7341_web.jpg


7fwPZnE.png

 

8643298391_d47584a085_b.jpg


#14 renamerusk

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 01:19 PM

I did see the statue of a longhorn steer to emphasize Dallas' Cowtown Image. :huh:

 

Is there a Fort Worth Station for the Fort Worth that is so liberally being included in Dallas-Fort Worth, if so I would be interested in seeing one?



#15 johnfwd

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:08 AM

In this CNBC.Com article, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies has a deal with South Korea to commercially license this technological innovation, and possibly build a high-speed transit system in that country.  But the reliability and efficiency of this technology has not been proven yet through research and development.  While I believe hyperloop as a high-speed transportation alternative to high-speed rail holds promise for the future, I think this may be "putting the cart before the horse." 

 

http://www.cnbc.com/...outh-korea.html



#16 BlueMound

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:12 PM

Hyperloop outlines 10 high-potential routes

The US was the country to feature most prominently on the winner's list, with four different routes

connecting a number of major cities. The longest comes from a team called Texas Triangle,

who put forward a proposal that could connect Houston, Austin, San Antonio,

Dallas and Laredo with 1,030 km (640 mi) of tube. 

 

http://newatlas.com/...hallenge/51365/



#17 renamerusk

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 07:12 PM

Hyperloop outlines 10 high-potential routes

The US was the country to feature most prominently on the winner's list, with four different routes

connecting a number of major cities. The longest comes from a team called Texas Triangle,

who put forward a proposal that could connect Houston, Austin, San Antonio,

Dallas and Laredo with 1,030 km (640 mi) of tube. 

 

http://newatlas.com/...hallenge/51365/

 

 

If Fort Worth is not apart of this, then I don't give a damn.



#18 tamtagon

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 05:34 AM

It worked on the Jetsons.

 

It worked on Logan's Run.



#19 RD Milhollin

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 09:33 AM

More Texas (and Fort Worth) Hyperloop stuff, this time from S-T transportation writer Gordon Dickson:

 

http://www.star-tele...e177393856.html

 

I can appreciate that the Hyperloop concept is thinking outside the box but I don't see any significant operational advantages over a high-speed rail system. Given the cost of constructing the track/tube needed and of electrifying a track segment enough to levitate the pods, why is the H-L concept more cost effective? HSR needs expensive trackage and requires electricity as well. Is the speed all that important? the comparison seems to be about 45 minutes Dallas to Houston vs 1.5 hours. Does the privacy of the individual pods make H-L more attractive? Trains in Europe have cars configured with individual compartments and have had for years. Safety concerns may be a deal-breaker; HSR accidents, although infrequent, seem to be about as serious as plane crashes, also very infrequent. In the H-L if the power went out are the passengers able to make an emergency exit into the tube, and how far would they have to hike to exit the system? The same development and construction hurdles faced by H-L are those facing HSR; I wonder if Elon Musk would be more effective in affecting US transportation by sticking with developing more production capacity for high-quality electric cars and investing in advanced HSR (Mag-Lev, etc.) between major cities?

 

The article mentions a proposed H-L test line terminating in Fort Worth, Dallas, and connecting to DFW Airport. This would probably be a good way to test the feasibility of the concept on a limited scale, but if they do it I hope the infrastructure built could be easily converted to support more conventional HSR tracks if H-L is proven to be impractical, for whatever reason.



#20 Electricron

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 10:10 AM

You wouldn’t be able to escape the Hyperloop vehicle because the tube is in a vacuum. You would suffocate in the tube once you’re outside the vehicle. If per chance there was breathable air in the tube, and if the diameter of the tube is only large enough for siting passengers within the vehicles, you wouldn’t be able to stand up to walk, you’ll be crawling to the escape hatches. Then consider if there will be lights inside the tube? If the base of the tube was full of electrical coils for electromagnets and power cables, what would you be crawling upon? The larger the vehicle diameter, the larger the tube diameter, the less advantages it has over traditional high speed trains.

#21 JBB

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 10:47 AM

You really think they'll design and build this thing without safety and escape issues being taken into account?



#22 Electricron

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 11:50 AM

You really think they'll design and build this thing without safety and escape issues being taken into account?

No, the Feds will require them. But Hyperloop will loose all its speed advantages including them.

#23 JBB

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 01:35 PM

So you think that they'll design and build a transportation system that is rendered useless by safety requirements?  You're like the guy on here that followed up every pic of a tower crane being assembled with a "I hope they remembered to install the counterweights" post.  We get it.  You know a lot about transportation.  Your expertise loses a little credibility when you operate under the assumption that the people making it happen are complete morons.



#24 Electricron

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 03:23 PM

So you think that they'll design and build a transportation system that is rendered useless by safety requirements?  You're like the guy on here that followed up every pic of a tower crane being assembled with a "I hope they remembered to install the counterweights" post.  We get it.  You know a lot about transportation.  Your expertise loses a little credibility when you operate under the assumption that the people making it happen are complete morons.

What Hyperloop proposes and what university students have built have been two entirely different things. Hyperloop proposed magnetic elevation and propulsion when the trains are at top speeds, yet every university entry uses guide wheels to date, of one sort or another. Even space scientists placed animals in their test space capsules, yet none of the university entries have. The maximum speed of all the university entries are less than TGV maximum speeds. Sure Ive been very disappointed with Hyperloop technology. Maybe we should wait until the technology has reached a useable mature state of development before discussing building a commercial version of it between two cities. The DC3 was the first airplane capable of providing a profitable passenger commercial plane service, decades after the Wright Brothers flew their first biplane at Kitty Hawk.
NASA has proven a technology to get astronauts to the moon, yet no commercial spaceship takes passengers there yet. Its too expensive, and too dangerous for a commercial company to provide that service. Practically has to follow possibility or that commercial transportation service for the everyday mass of people to use will never happen.

#25 A_Random_Username

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 11:29 PM

 

Hyperloop outlines 10 high-potential routes

The US was the country to feature most prominently on the winner's list, with four different routes

connecting a number of major cities. The longest comes from a team called Texas Triangle,

who put forward a proposal that could connect Houston, Austin, San Antonio,

Dallas and Laredo with 1,030 km (640 mi) of tube. 

 

http://newatlas.com/...hallenge/51365/

 

 

If Fort Worth is not apart of this, then I don't give a damn.

 

I agree.



#26 johnfwd

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 06:58 AM

If a hyperloop system proves technically and economically feasible, and the safety issues are resolved, in the long term this system will surely compete with HSR for a share of venture capital and other resources.  What intrigues me is whether there will come a time when the public chooses which system it prefers over the other.  I believe a choice will be necessary, given the limits to funding such projects and the availability of land for their construction.  I believe the two systems could not avoid a rivalry in that they are similar in their use of "tracks" to transport people and objects over long distances and at high speeds.






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