Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

B.F. Maupin's Historic Photographs


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 10 January 2015 - 10:07 PM

Mr. B.F. Maupin has contributed three historic photographs to this site, and I have placed them in the Jack White Collection.

 

The first, is a photograph taken on Stove Foundry Road.  This road has been modernized and renamed W. Vickery Blvd. 

stovefoundry2.jpg

 

This is B.F. Maupin's, Great-grandmother.  Her maiden name was Dicie Herrin Boudreaux, and she was from Capiah, Mississippi.  According to Mr. Maupin, she was married several times with her last name being Maupin, Ryan, Jorden, and Jones.  When the photograph was taken, she was Mrs. William T. Jones.  One of the men in the photograph was her son Oscar Jorden.

stovefoundry1.jpg

 

The last photo was taken in Samuel Rosen's Office, located on the northeast corner of Clinton Ave. and N.W. 25th Street.  The lady on the left is "Maggie".  I think her given name was Magnolia.  In the back is Samuel Rosen and on the right is Ephriham Rosen.  The calendar in the back indicates that it is March 1923 and the clock says it is 3:10 PM.  The cabinet in the back contains deeds to property sold; but not paid for.  Samuel Rosen never foreclosed on any property.  Also, note the drinking water keg in the back.  There are "chunks of ice", hooks hanging on the wall and only one drinking cup.  The above text was provided by B.F. Maupin.

rosenoffice.jpg



#2 Ghost Writer in Disguise

Ghost Writer in Disguise

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 284 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridglea West

Posted 10 January 2015 - 10:33 PM

Whereabouts on Stove Foundry? Looks like some kind of trophy in the middle. What are the mysterious objects held by the boys in the foreground?



#3 B. F. MAUPIN

B. F. MAUPIN

    Newcomer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:2112 LEE AVENUE, FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Posted 11 January 2015 - 05:55 PM

I am 81. The last person I knew about the Stove Foundry passed away in 1939.  I was 5 years old.

I got my first automobile in 1952 and I drove out on Stove Foundry Road.  Only thing on the road was the raillroad steam engine roundhouse.  I walked in there and asked where was the Stove Foundry.

None of the older employees knew the answer to that.

.

The stove foundry is NOT in the phone books, City Directories or City maps because this was a rural area outside the Fort Worth City limits.

.

The photograph shows a large wood burning heating stove used in large areas, like a funeral home, hotel lobby, etc.  The stove color is grey trimmed in Chrome plate detail.  I don't know what that is on the top.  It is not a trophy. 

.

The telephone system West of Fort Worth and out passed Benbrook was from Arlington Texas.

I think the Arlington Library's oldest phone book is 1940.  I am going to continue to search.

.

One of the young fellows sitting on the dock is  O.B. Jordan.  He taught my Grandfather how to be a barber.  In the early days Barbers were not trained or licensed.

.

B.F. MAUPIN

.

 



#4 djold1

djold1

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 689 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76179

Posted 12 January 2015 - 06:11 AM

Welcome Bill...


Pete Charlton
The Fort Worth Gazette blog
The Lost Antique Maps of Fort Worth on CDROM
Website: Antique Maps of Texas
Large format reproductions of original antique and vintage Texas & southwestern maps
 


#5 Dismuke

Dismuke

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,038 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth
  • Interests:Late 19th/early 20th century history, popular culture architecture and music. Collecting 78 rpm records from the 1900 - 1930 era.

Posted 14 January 2015 - 11:56 PM

Thanks for the neat photos B. F Maupin.

 

Regarding the location of the stove foundry -  some while back I came across an old map somewhere that noted the stove foundry.  Comparing the old map to a google map using the river and the T&P railroad tracks as landmarks on both, my guesstimate was that it was located approximately where the old Holiday Inn, later Ramada inn on University (demolished a few years back for Chisholm Trail Pkwy construction) was.  Unfortunately, I have no recollection at all where I saw the map - and certainly no way of knowing how accurate it was.  Perhaps djold1 might be aware of what map I might have seen.

 

I wonder if the stoves that were made there were stamped with any particular trademark.  It would be kind of neat to find a surviving stove that was made there.


Radio Dismuke
1920s & 1930s Pop & Jazz
24-Hour Internet Radio
www.RadioDismuke.com


#6 Dismuke

Dismuke

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,038 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth
  • Interests:Late 19th/early 20th century history, popular culture architecture and music. Collecting 78 rpm records from the 1900 - 1930 era.

Posted 15 January 2015 - 12:16 AM

I might have just found the map - on djold1's blog.  Not fully sure if this is the same map that I saw.  But it does mark the location of the stove works:

 

http://fortworthgaze...ant-county.html


Radio Dismuke
1920s & 1930s Pop & Jazz
24-Hour Internet Radio
www.RadioDismuke.com


#7 B. F. MAUPIN

B. F. MAUPIN

    Newcomer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:2112 LEE AVENUE, FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Posted 15 January 2015 - 08:14 AM

Fort Worth City Directory reports the office in 1923 was    AMERICAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY

1001 Railway Avenue, street name later changed to Rio Grande Avenue later paved over by Interstate 30 West.

1925 the name change to Bolcourt Machinery Company same address.

1926  no longer listed.  I guess wood burning stoves were no longer in demand.

.



#8 M C Toyer

M C Toyer

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts

Posted 16 January 2015 - 01:00 AM

A February 1907 article in the Fort Worth Star Telegram states the Axtell Windmill Company was building a new plant on the site of the old stove factory.  Location described as 2 miles from the post office, just west of the Trimble Station, in a new development known as the Factory Place Addition.

 

Ads for the addition show it on either side of the Texas and Pacific RR just west of the Frisco RR crossing and the Clear Fork.  That is consistent with the 1895 Sam Street map Dismuke cited with the foundry being north of the main line tracks.

 

There is also a graphic representation of the "Stove Works" in the same locale on the 1891 Wellge Birds-Eye View of Fort Worth viewable on the Amon Carter Museum website.

 

Somewhat related, and piquing my curiosity, is 1917 request for bids by Tarrant County to erect the old 7th Street Bridge at a point on Clear Fork near the Axtell Windmill Factory. 

 

These references would also be consistent with the Stove Foundry being on the Granbury Road, another name for Stove Foundry Road, prior to Vickery.

 

The 1920 CH Rogers City of Fort Worth map shows the "Axtell Factory" to be on the east side of Trinity Street between Granbury / Vickery and the railroad.  Google Maps shows that to be a vacant lot but soon to be, if not already, directly on the line of the Chisholm Trail Parkway. 



#9 AndyN

AndyN

    Skyscraper Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midland, Tx. for now

Posted 20 January 2015 - 11:31 AM

http://www.fortworth...theraxtell2.jpg
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#10 AndyN

AndyN

    Skyscraper Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,948 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midland, Tx. for now

Posted 20 January 2015 - 11:33 AM

There are already some pics of the foundry/windmill building on this site.

Attached Files


Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#11 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 26 January 2015 - 07:38 PM

Today, I scanned three more historic photographs from Mr. Maupin. Another arrived in the mail this afternoon.  I will get them posted as soon as I can.  The latest scans are a view of the skyline from inside the door of North Fort Worth High, another view looking over the North Side with the Armour and Swift Plants in the background, and a view of Fire Station No. 12.  The photo that I have yet to scan is of the North Fort Worth Public School, later M.G. Ellis.



#12 Zetna

Zetna

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 134 posts
  • Location:Fairmount

Posted 28 January 2015 - 09:15 AM

"The photograph shows a large wood burning heating stove used in large areas, like a funeral home, hotel lobby, etc.  The stove color is grey trimmed in Chrome plate detail.  I don't know what that is on the top.  It is not a trophy."

 

I had an old wood burning stove similar to this w/ an ornament on top. I was told that if you put some scented oil in it that the smell would drift through the air w/ the heat. I tried it and it worked great. Maybe the ornament in the photo was used for the same purpose.



#13 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 31 January 2015 - 06:35 PM

Mr. Maupin sent me three more historic photographs and I scanned them this week.  The first is a view out of the North Fort Worth High School, looking toward the meatpacking plants.  This is taken from "The Lasso".  You can see the Armour and Swift plants in the distance.  The street in the foreground is Lee Avenue.  All of the houses on that street are still standing.

swift-armour.jpg

Speaking of the high school, here is a view looking south from inside the front door.  At the time the photograph was taken, Circle Park Boulevard was not paved.  This photo was taken in the early 1920's.  You can see the old smokestacks from the power plant and the skyline beyond.

skyline-nfwhigh.jpg

The final photograph that Mr. Maupin contributed is one of Fire Station No. 12.  The photograph was taken in 1916.

firestation12.jpg



#14 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,542 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 31 January 2015 - 09:21 PM

In the first of the three recently scanned photos one can see another "mansion-style" office building on the Armour side of the packing-house complex across Exchange Street from the Swift/Spaghetti Warehouse/XTO office. I would like to see that building recreated as part of the redevelopment of the hilltop Stockyards project... whatever that project ends up being. I would also be interested in knowing what happened to that building, presumably the Armour equivalent of the Swift offices.



#15 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 31 January 2015 - 10:00 PM

It was the Armour equivalent of the Swift Office Building.  It was demolished in the early 1970's.  Below is a photograph from the Jack White Collection of Historic Fort Worth Photographs from the University of Texas at Arlington.

1936armourswift.jpg



#16 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 15 February 2015 - 03:03 PM

This is one of the latest photographs contributed by Mr. B.F. Maupin.  It is a view of West 7th Street being paved.  The Elks Club is the building on the right and Burnett Park is on the left.  Bank of America/500 W. 7th sits on that site at the current time.  In the distance, you can see Arlington Heights.

7th-lamar.jpg



#17 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 15 February 2015 - 03:16 PM

This is another photograph contributed by Mr. B.F. Maupin.  It is of the old North Fort Worth Public School.  It was built in 1905 and its address was at 215 N.E. 14th Street.  The building's location was in the far rear portion of the current Fort Worth Mercado's parking lot.  It was renamed M.G. Ellis Elementary School when it was converted into an elementary.  In 1958, a Mid-Century Modern addition was placed to the east of the building.  This building was shut down in 1968 and continued to stand until it was destroyed by fire in January of 1986.  Since that time, the remaining M.G. Ellis Elementary School has been expanded.

nfwpublicschool.jpg



#18 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 15 February 2015 - 04:24 PM

The next photograph that has been added is an aerial of the Northside of the city.  Mr. Maupin noted the photo with the major buildings.  Unfortunately, I didn't remove the label for the instructions, so I will have to re-scan this picture.

northsideaerial.jpg



#19 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 15 February 2015 - 04:25 PM

The final one that I scanned this week is a summary of the 1886 Fort Worth City Directory.

1886citydirectory.jpg



#20 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 25 February 2015 - 08:22 PM

Here is Magnolia, also known as "Maggie", Sam Rosen's secretary. 

magnolia.jpg



#21 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,178 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 28 February 2015 - 02:14 AM

Why did Armour leave the stockyards?


- Dylan


#22 B. F. MAUPIN

B. F. MAUPIN

    Newcomer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:2112 LEE AVENUE, FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Posted 28 February 2015 - 10:33 AM

The Internet address   FORTWORTHSTOCKYARDS.COM    is a exellect source of information and will answer your question.

The Livestock Exchange Building nearby houses a large museum on this subject.

B.F.  MAUPIN

.



#23 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 28 February 2015 - 11:31 AM

B.F., I have a correction. It is http://www.fortworthstockyards.org.



#24 PeopleAreStrange

PeopleAreStrange

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,178 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Suburbia

Posted 28 February 2015 - 03:24 PM

Thanks, y'all.


- Dylan


#25 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 18 March 2015 - 09:02 PM

The next addition to B.F. Maupin's collection is a bird's eye view of the Northside.  In the distance, you can see Sam Rosen's store.  It is labeled as such.  That building is still standing today as Marisco's Acapulco Restaurant at 1340 N.W. 25th Street.  The cross street at the intersection is Columbus Avenue.  The house facing the store is still standing today.  The photograph was taken from the community windmill.  The following is from Mr. Maupin.

 

Sam Rosen's strategy was to sell lots to clients with vacant lots in between. The reason was all of these people moved here from out of state.  So, when relatives decided to move here, they could purchase a vacant lot next to their in-laws.

 

Long time residents has bars for their horse and buggy.   They would be neighborly and let new residents stall their horses in their barns.

 

BF-Rosenstore.jpg



#26 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,752 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 22 March 2015 - 05:28 PM

This map was dated 1930. The Paddock Viaduct (North Main Street) was built in 1913.  Before then, there were two ways to travel north. They were Samuels Avenue and Cemetery Road. The Jacksboro Highway was identified as "New Road to the Lake", and did not continue downtown.  The red numbers with the circles are streetcar and bus lines. 1 thru 21 for the streetcar and 22 thru 29 for the bus lines.  Carroll Street never went north past Franklin, today White Settlement Road.  Burleson never went north past the Trinity River.  Today, it's named University Drive.

 

BF-Cemeteryroad.jpg






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users