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Affordable Housing


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#1 McHand

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 07:32 PM

Everyone on the forum should read this article.

 

http://www.star-tele...cycle.html?rh=1

 

 

Fort Worth needs 17,000 more affordable-housing units to serve the lowest income segment of the population, city officials have determined.

 

 


What is "affordable housing"?  I don't know an exact number, but I know that it is not any of the current projects being planned in the inner city, which are mostly - if not all - billed as "luxury lofts" and the like.  

 

This is what I am harping on all the time in terms of urban redevelopment - housing is going up, but who is going to live there?  It all caters to those among us who have the most choice, leaving nothing for those with less resource for choice, but who still need a place to call home.  

 

In fact, they are already calling those places "home," without four walls or a roof.

 

Jane Jacobs talks about the concept of Turf, in which planned housing - either institutionally planned housing for the poor, or high-end housing projects - fracture our city into different Turfs, contributing to the sense of "otherness" with which people of different classes and incomes view each other.  This in turn contributes to dangerous streets, because people don't look out for each other when "others" are on their Turf.

 

Turf is toxic to cities, and yet Fort Worth and many other places are already fractured by them.  

 

Back to my original point - affordable housing needs to be provided sooner than later.  There has to be a developer out there that can provide basic, clean, new structures for people to live in, especially in areas where land tax values are still not exhorbitant.

 

These places have to be near transit, so putting some cheap apartments outside the loop is definitely not a solution.  These have to be infill developments.

 

Fort Worth's homeless population is not going to get any smaller if this doesn't happen.  Will it completely solve the problem?  No.  But building nothing for people with lower incomes will virtually guarantee the continuation of the problem.

 

ETA: Don't miss the subheading "A Cycle of Cruel Frustrations"


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#2 Russ Graham

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 09:24 AM

interesting article - they certainly touch on a lot of different topics.  I think the Danny Scarth quote sums up a lot: "whose job is it to help the homeless".

 

I agree with Andy Taft that the city can and should do more to provide affordable housing.



#3 Austin55

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 02:24 PM

Not just affordable housing and public transit, but affordable retail options to. Looking at the retail, restaurant and grocer options  in the walkable areas of FW they are all rather upscale. 

 

Here's another good article, Is Urban Revitalization Without Gentrification Possible?



#4 johnfwd

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 05:25 AM

A few days ago former President Jimmy Carter was in Fort Worth participating in his "Habitats for Humanity" home-construction program for the homeless and low-income people.  It's a worthy cause, but is it having any impact?



#5 McHand

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 10:40 PM

Not just affordable housing and public transit, but affordable retail options to. Looking at the retail, restaurant and grocer options  in the walkable areas of FW they are all rather upscale. 

 

Here's another good article, Is Urban Revitalization Without Gentrification Possible?

 

YES.  It all seems to either be Wal-Mart or the Shoppes at University Park Place Plaza.

 

The Urban Village movement should fill this gap, if we can ever get away from the idea of an urban village as a three to five year playground for young professional childless singles.


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#6 McHand

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Posted 22 October 2014 - 11:01 PM

Not just affordable housing and public transit, but affordable retail options to. Looking at the retail, restaurant and grocer options  in the walkable areas of FW they are all rather upscale. 

 

Here's another good article, Is Urban Revitalization Without Gentrification Possible?

 

From your article, Austin:

 

 

Edwards said the key to revitalization without gentrification is “bringing residents and the community to the table often and at the beginning.” This kind of public planning process requires a great investment of time and resources by city governments, but without this investment, the only result may be inequitable, developer-led urban revitalization. 

 

Which is exactly what I see happening in certain up-and-coming neighborhoods in Fort Worth.

 

Is our city government too lazy, unconcerned, or both?


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#7 Fort Worthology

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 09:56 AM

 

Not just affordable housing and public transit, but affordable retail options to. Looking at the retail, restaurant and grocer options  in the walkable areas of FW they are all rather upscale. 

 

Here's another good article, Is Urban Revitalization Without Gentrification Possible?

 

From your article, Austin:

 

 

Edwards said the key to revitalization without gentrification is “bringing residents and the community to the table often and at the beginning.” This kind of public planning process requires a great investment of time and resources by city governments, but without this investment, the only result may be inequitable, developer-led urban revitalization. 

 

Which is exactly what I see happening in certain up-and-coming neighborhoods in Fort Worth.

 

Is our city government too lazy, unconcerned, or both?

 

 

 

Fort Worth city gov has long held the viewpoint that all development is good development.  That's the viewpoint that leads to lackluster central city projects often getting rubber-stamped, and leads to endless seas of sprawl development that is not sustainable.



#8 John T Roberts

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 10:31 AM

Kevin, thank you for your previous statement.  In my workings over the last few years with the city through Historic Fort Worth, I have found that your statement is entirely true.



#9 McHand

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Posted 24 October 2014 - 11:03 AM

And we now see the ramifications of this beyond city aesthetics.  It is time we demand more thoughtfulness from our elected officials.


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#10 RD Milhollin

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 11:52 AM

HUD Secretary visits and praises Fort Worth affordable housing renovation:

 

http://www.star-tele...fort-worth.html



#11 McHand

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 03:49 PM

Can't read the article.  Darn paywall!


Voice & Guitars in The Crystal Furs
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#12 pelligrini

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 11:09 AM

I think it's a bad link, it won't resolve on my end.


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#13 elpingüino

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 12:57 PM

This should work: http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/11/19/6302871/hud-secretary-describes-fort-worth.html 



#14 David Love

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 03:39 PM

I think Fort Worth is making some inroads, at least attempting to address homeless issues and making some progress with affordable housing.

 

I do think they can do better, perhaps offering projects for starter homes / residences, entry level abodes for those not making six figures and up, maybe even targeting those with upwards of six kids.


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#15 RD Milhollin

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Posted 27 November 2014 - 11:38 AM

"Tiny Houses" provides homes for homeless in Madison WI. Homeless people have already successfully "downsized" something more and more middle-class Americans are trying to do, some with more success than others. Someone who doesn't have a lot of possessions doesn't need a lot of square footage to keep that stuff in. Homeless families could be provided slightly smaller "Less-Tiny" homes. This could be one of the answers needed to the high concentration of homeless camps along east Lancaster and neighboring wooded areas along creeks and railroads. This sort of arrangement would provide more privacy than institutional housing, and nominal rents could be charged once residents have secured employment, thus building personal confidence and bridging the gap between their present situation and a more "productive " lifestyle. Once these sorts of small neighborhoods are established, necessarily close to employment sources, advocacy groups and agencies (AA, Catholic Charities, MHMR, JPS Clinics, etc.) could locate field offices close by, and a bus stop just outside the community could provide needed transportation to jobs. 

 

http://www.huffingto..._n_6171634.html



#16 Austin55

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 12:40 PM

Star Telegram

http://www.star-tele...e137576758.html

#17 RD Milhollin

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 12:17 PM

Residential and true mixed use (residential +) developers are going to try to reach for the highest rent they can get since for the most part they are in business to make money. These same developers are happy to take money from the city or from other public entities as an incentive to build, sometimes refusing to even consider a deal without incentives being on the table. The taxing entity usually asks for some concessions in return, such as minority/women contractors, a minimum number of local jobs created, design criteria, etc. The city could help address the homeless problem by requiring developers receiving tax incentives to include a certain percentage of affordable housing units to their projects, especially in areas where low-wage jobs that could be held by unspecialized workers are located. Every development has floors, views, exposures, etc. that are less desirable to clients, small, no-frills apartments could be included in these parts of the complex, perhaps just above the mixed0-use storefronts where employment might be offered. If the design of the development and the surrounding neighborhood were pedestrian-friendly and included basic amenities the residents of the rent-controlled units would not have to devote scarce resources to owning and maintaining a car, and could start to save money for other things... I know this is not a new idea, and would be interested if local jurisdictions here are or have used this approach before.



#18 McHand

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 06:09 PM

 

Directions Home started in 2008 with the goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2018.  :excl:


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#19 Askelon

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 08:20 PM

So,,,Dallas spent about 7 million to build 50 tiny houses for the homeless ( $140,000 +/- each.)  Do not know what is included in the total price ( land, utilities, etc.)  Question ?  Would this be a situation where the use of repurposed shipping containers could lower the costs ? Mix and match for one person or a whole family. Maybe get some Pro Bono  architectural design  work from local students under Licensed Architects supervision. Or am I just playing Disney here ? ( "When you wish upon a star,,,") Don't get me wrong. If we can create housing in an aesthetically pleasing, funtional manner, and lower the costs per unit, isn't that a good thing? ( Personal note

- I really wanted to use containers to build my house 2 decades ago. The style potential appeals to me.)


Without deviation from the norm progress is not possible. F. Zappa.


#20 Austin55

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 08:33 PM

It doesn't seem containers are all that feasible.

http://markasaurus.c...ing-everything/

#21 Askelon

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 09:50 PM

    I see the point. Shame that this problem has so many roadblock to a solution. I built my own house, hands on. Sometimes I forget how much it would cost to hire others.   Thanx for the link. Guess I should do more research.


Without deviation from the norm progress is not possible. F. Zappa.





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