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#51 fortworthhorn

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 08:54 PM

If a Fort Worth stop makes no sense. Than a Arlington stop seems even more less likely. But I see it this way. The real goal is to link coast to coast. Just like the train system in the 1800's . You gotta start somewhere . To the north .Oklahoma, Kansas. Chicago will want to get in on this. To the west. Midland Odessa, Albuquergue, Phoenix on to LA. . Stops at Dallas and Fort Worth on high speed to me makes sense. And Light rail and buses for feeder links into the city. And I think we got to get Austin and San Antonio in the system somehow.

I think right now the Austin and SA stops would be at the airport.

I could be wrong on that.

So unless multiple GOOD, PUBLIC and EASY transit options are available from the airport, then you are looking at having to rent a car.



#52 renamerusk

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 12:35 AM

No surprise. KERA reports that Dallas trashes Fort Worth/Arlington HSR corridor finding that it is a big waste. 

 

This is the first of two rounds of hearings:  The first for the TCR+Fort Worth/Arlington corridor. The second to be for the TXDOT-OKDOT-Mexico DOT corridor.  Now will Dallas be left out of the TX/OK/MEX corridor as Dallas finds the I-30 corridor wasteful? Really, Dallas can connect to Fort Worth via TRE, right?



#53 Now in Denton

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 05:05 AM

Would most agree this is competition for the airports ? Light rail is same as taxis and buses. High speed is aiming at passengers who would other wise fly. Given all the fees airlines charge. I don't care if airliners get feeling hurt.



#54 Binx

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 10:45 PM

If a Fort Worth stop makes no sense. Than a Arlington stop seems even more less likely. But I see it this way. The real goal is to link coast to coast. Just like the train system in the 1800's . You gotta start somewhere . To the north .Oklahoma, Kansas. Chicago will want to get in on this. To the west. Midland Odessa, Albuquergue, Phoenix on to LA. . Stops at Dallas and Fort Worth on high speed to me makes sense. And Light rail and buses for feeder links into the city. And I think we got to get Austin and San Antonio in the system somehow.

 

Is this true?  My understanding is that there are only a few corridors where HSR makes sense (FL, TX, CA, East Coast, maybe PNW). 



#55 renamerusk

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 01:38 PM

....Dallas has a feeder-distribution system in place for a downtown HSR station in DART, Fort Worth doesn't;.....

 

Okay, time for a show of hands by you who use DART or TRE to catch a flight out of DFW or Love Field?;  And how did you deal with your luggage when at the time?

 

I argue that DART nor TRE are that relevant for intercity travel.



#56 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 08:16 PM

I would consider taking TEX Rail to the airport if it were an option.

 

The TRE requires multiple bus transfers from Centreport, and the Orange line is out of the way.


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#57 fortworthhorn

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 09:15 PM

 

....Dallas has a feeder-distribution system in place for a downtown HSR station in DART, Fort Worth doesn't;.....

 

Okay, time for a show of hands by you who use DART or TRE to catch a flight out of DFW or Love Field?;  And how did you deal with your luggage when at the time?

 

I argue that DART nor TRE are that relevant for intercity travel.

 

I take the TRE when I can.

A lot of times though I have 7:25 flights out of DFW which would not be possible with the TRE.

The first train leaves T&P around 5 AM but then you have to deal with the double transfer and waits with the Centre Port bus and the Long Term Parking bus.

When I do have time to spare I do it.

I just read or do work.

 

In terms of the luggage I travel light so I am not the best person to ask.



#58 AndyN

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 03:07 PM

My last trip was to Riverside California last October. On a wednesday, I left the car at my office and caught a T bus to the intermodal station. Hopped on the TRE to Centreport, bus to the rental car facility and a second bus to my departure terminal. Virgin to LAX. Express bus from LAX to Los Angeles Union Station. Metrolink to downtown Riverside California and a cab to the Mission Inn.

 

Return trip was the opposite except I caught the early Sunday train from Riverside to San Bernardino and then into Los Angeles Union Station.

 

I had a roller suitcase, a laptop computer and a coat.


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#59 brownjd

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 09:41 AM

My last trip was to Riverside California last October. On a wednesday, I left the car at my office and caught a T bus to the intermodal station. Hopped on the TRE to Centreport, bus to the rental car facility and a second bus to my departure terminal. Virgin to LAX. Express bus from LAX to Los Angeles Union Station. Metrolink to downtown Riverside California and a cab to the Mission Inn.

 

Return trip was the opposite except I caught the early Sunday train from Riverside to San Bernardino and then into Los Angeles Union Station.

 

I didn't think the TRE ran on Sunday. When did you fly back to DFW? Lack of Sunday service has always stopped us from using it for airport travel.



#60 JBB

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 10:36 AM

Just speculating, but he said his trip was in October and the TRE runs on Sundays during the state fair. Maybe his trip overlapped with that?

#61 AndyN

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Posted 30 November 2014 - 08:51 PM

Yep, you're right. I had a pickup on at the airport Sunday. Brain fart. Good point.

 

But I sure didn't have to pay parking fees.


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#62 BlueMound

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 05:19 PM

Groundbreaking on California's $68 Billion High Speed Rail
http://www.npr.org/b...speed-rail-line

#63 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 11:04 PM

They're $55 BILLION short on their $68 BILLION HSR line?!?! :o ?!

 

$68 Billion is the equivalent of nearly one hundred TEX Rail (northeast segment) lines.


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#64 johnfwd

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 03:29 PM

The FWBP article below is more about Fort Worth's phenomenal growth than about high-speed rail.  Except for one sentence in the last paragraph:

 

"All of these successes – and future initiatives, such as high-speed rail, which is in the planning stages – have generated substantial momentum."

 

http://fwbusinesspre...th-in-2014.aspx

 

At least the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce believes FW is going to be included in an HSR project at some point in the future.  Is this for real, or just blowing smoke?



#65 BlueMound

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 05:47 PM

Eurasian High Speed Rail to create new 'Silk Road'

http://nextbigfuture...to-beijing.html



#66 renamerusk

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 06:00 PM

At least the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce believes FW is going to be included in an HSR project at some point in the future.  Is this for real, or just blowing smoke?

 

  If Fort Worth forgets how to play hard politics, I'm betting that they are not just blowing smoke.



#67 johnfwd

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 07:45 AM

French involvement in Texas HSR is an interesting possible development, as Gordon Dickson reports in this S-T article (if you can get past the pay wall to read it). 

 

http://www.star-tele...cle8202234.html



#68 renamerusk

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 02:09 PM

French involvement in Texas HSR is an interesting possible development...

 

"Excerpt redacted per forum rules - please use link above"

Great, a company that is wise enough to get a true picture of the Texas HSR political “landscape” and that even wanders off of the beaten path to find downtown Fort Worth? :swg:

Inspite of TCR(Hou-Dal) HSR, TXDOT is proceeding with its more ambitious goal to connect all of the state’s major population centers with Fort Worth/Tarrant County being the shadow power and the pivot point in the HSR debate.
 


Edited by AndyN, 02 February 2015 - 08:26 PM.
Forum rule violation


#69 johnfwd

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 03:49 PM

Thanks for the excerpt (maybe I should break down and pay the 99 cents).

 

I'm glad to see that Fort Worth stakeholders are sticking with it, rather than ceding HSR to Dallas.



#70 elpingüino

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 08:28 AM

The Star-Telegram generally makes articles visible for free if you access them from their Facebook pages first. Try going here and clicking on the headline: https://www.facebook.com/startelegram/posts/10153118060828530 



#71 johnfwd

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 10:20 AM

Thank you (just don't let the IT people in charge of the Star-Telegram's paywall know about this Facebook bypass).

 

Reading more of the article above about possible French involvement in Texas HSR, I'm beginning to see a trend here of private foreign investment (e.g., Japanese, maybe the French) to support domestic investors (with state project planning and oversight).  My guess is that Texans are so cynical about the lack of any significant federal/state government HSR funding that they're seeking private investments from domestic and/or foreign sources.



#72 renamerusk

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 02:01 PM

....My guess is that Texans are so cynical about the lack of any significant federal/state government HSR funding that they're seeking private investments from domestic and/or foreign sources.

 

Texas' leadership, both state and national,  leads the effort for scuttling public infrastructure.



#73 RD Milhollin

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 08:13 PM

High-Speed Rail in the Texas Legislature 2015...

 

http://www.star-tele...le21007680.html



#74 renamerusk

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 10:07 AM

Allow that, and though they, HSR and TCR, might be viewed as one in the same, the approach taken by TCR has one, revealed the assumptive flaw of its approach from its beginning to its entirety; and has two, damaged the more sensible and politically tactful approach now underway to build a publicly funded HSR for a greater number of communities and regions within the state.

 

I sincerely hope that HSR Public can resuscitate new support from the Legislature and the Ballot for a system that uses existing ROW (highways) which may or may not be more costlier, but which may be viewed as less threatening to property owners.  Today, TCR has only poisoned the well with the fallout that it has created.

 

What is inexplicable, is the institutional support given by Gordon Dickinson (FWST) and the NCTCOG for TCR and what has long been evident of a shell game.



#75 Electricron

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Posted 16 May 2015 - 11:11 PM

High-Speed Rail in the Texas Legislature 2015...

 

http://www.star-tele...le21007680.html

Per the Startlegram:

Because of a backroom maneuver by high-speed-rail opponents, the catchall appropriations bill recently passed the Senate with language that effectively bars the Texas Department of Transportation from using state money for bullet-train planning.

TCR isn't using TDOT funding for planning or environmental impacts. It's the extension to Fort Worth and the I-35 HSR corridors that are. 

Additionally, this bill does not prevent TXDOT subsidizing any train in the future, regular speed or high speed. 


#76 renamerusk

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 12:52 AM

1. Per the Startlegram:

 

2. TCR isn't using TDOT funding for planning or environmental impacts.

 

3. It's the extension to Fort Worth and the I-35 HSR corridors that are. 

 

 

 1. Disparaging the paper of record in Fort Worth presumably for effect is usually where the conversation and talking ends; but in reply this -

 

 2. TCR isn't using public funds, though that seems to be in the realm of  "prima facie" posturing. But what is almost perfectly indisputable is that its viability is toast without it! All private transportation projects (tolls) depend on the network of public infrastructure to be successful.

 

 3. TCR is in hospice now with its opponents in ascendant, it is the extension to include Dallas via the Fort Worth-Austin-Houston-San Antonio corridor that still hangs by a thread thanks to the bungling manner that TCR has handled the revival of HSR-Texas.  Dallas will be a part of a public HSR, just from a different flight path.

 

 VTCR (Virtual Texas Central Railroad) has lost any hope, if ever any existed, of gaining the authority of Eminent Domain to actualize its project. 

 

When is the VTCR ES-P Report to come out; or a report of the total investment raised?



#77 renamerusk

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 08:16 AM

So, when there was a chance that the route would come to Fort Worth, did you all-out support the concept?.

 

Personally, I will look forward to riding the TRE to Dallas to catch a bullet train to Houston. I believe private enterprise will complete the undertaking more efficiently and rapidly than a government effort to complete the line. Shame on the self-serving interests to block the advancement of the State of Texas.

 

Yes, all-out support.

 

And It also seems that that kind of support is not unique to Fort Worth but is universal and has no boundary.

 

When it comes to having our city's future economic prosperity relegated to a less than a certain prospect of a HSR connection line to another neighboring city,  then Fort Worth ought to express its displeasure and use its power, admittedly with more civility than the following link demonstrates:

 

http://www.voanews.c...ct/2775635.html



#78 JBB

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 12:22 PM

So by all accounts, efforts to block high speed rail via an amendment to the budget legislation have failed. Does that mean the bullet train saw its shadow and we have at least 2 more years of false hope?

#79 jsfslls

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 10:05 AM

Recent Fort Worth Business article on the TCR & HSR. Talks a little bit about the Dallas-Forth Worth HSR, and the possibility of a high speed rail going along 35 from Fort Worth to San Antonio, and possibly down to Monterrey, Mexico. 

 

http://www.fortworth...1aac7dc1bb.html



#80 johnfwd

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 12:15 PM

Recent Fort Worth Business article on the TCR & HSR. Talks a little bit about the Dallas-Forth Worth HSR, and the possibility of a high speed rail going along 35 from Fort Worth to San Antonio, and possibly down to Monterrey, Mexico. 

 

http://www.fortworth...1aac7dc1bb.html

Welcome to the Forum!  And thank you for this article.  This quoted excerpt mirrors your paraphrasing above and caught my attention

 

"As the Dallas-Fort Worth project gains speed, Meadows said, a federally funded study could add a third high-speed rail route – along Interstate 35 between Fort Worth and San Antonio, with the possibility of extending it to Monterrey, Mexico."

 

Shades of the Trans-Texas Corridor!!  Don't forget that Laredo is betwixt San Antonio and Monterrey.  But Monterrey, Mexico?  Talk about the ambitious urges of state transportation planners...obviously getting Mexico to buy into HSR when I don't believe they've gone beyond old buses in these rural areas.  Someone who's been to Monterrey and environs may enlighten us about getting from point A to point B down there.



#81 Electricron

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 01:16 PM

Shades of the Trans-Texas Corridor!!  Don't forget that Laredo is betwixt San Antonio and Monterrey.  But Monterrey, Mexico?  Talk about the ambitious urges of state transportation planners...obviously getting Mexico to buy into HSR when I don't believe they've gone beyond old buses in these rural areas.  Someone who's been to Monterrey and environs may enlighten us about getting from point A to point B down there.

A truth: HSR needs a large metropolitan city to terminate its trains at.

We can argue forever over how large is enough.

 

Let's review the various metropolitan city populations along I-35:

OKC = 1,252,987

DFW = 6,426,214

Waco = 260,430

Temple = 66,102

Austin = 1,943,299

SA = 2,277,550

Laredo = 636,516

Monterrey = 4,089,962

 

FYI = Houston metro population is 6,313,158

 

Let's face some facts, metro Laredo's population including both Laredo and Nuevo Laredo isn't large enough to terminate a HSR train, Monterrey is. Some might suggest San Antonio or Austin by themselves aren't. But most believe adding both San Antonio and Austin together will be sufficient population to terminate one end of a HSR corridor.   

 

Likewise, some don't believe OKC is large enough to terminate a HSR train. I'm not sure that adding Tulsa to that end is sufficient, although it should help. It depends upon whether one believes 2 million, 3 million, or 4 million is needed to at least pay for HSR operations and maintenance trains and tracks costs.  

 

I believe around 4 million is needed at each end of the line just by looking at the existing HSR lines around the world. And that's why planners are looking at terminating the I-35 HSR corridor in Monterrey, they already believe Laredo isn't large enough. 



#82 RD Milhollin

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 10:44 PM

Monterrey is a massive urban center, and much of its population is officially uncounted. It is ranked as a Beta in the Global City Index (https://en.wikipedia...iki/Global_city), Houston and Dallas are rated BETA+, Fort Worth is not rated. It is a major manufacturing center; much of the new steel production in the continent takes place in 3 huge plants along the NW ring road/connector to Saltillo. It is the third business center of the country after DF and Guadalajara. There are rural areas outside of the urban core, easily the size of all of Fort Worth, but hemmed in to the south and west by 1000 foot mountains, to the north by desert, and smaller mountains to the east. The city has a metro that is subway in some places and elevated in others, fully grade-separated and has about the same annual ridership as Boston's metro.  

 

Mexico has pursued developing HSR before, with a contract awarded to a Chinese state-owned rail firm to build a route from Buenavista Station on the northwest side of the DF to Quetararo and then to Guadalajara, but the contract was voided last year due to political concerns. Sometimes-richest-guy-on-the-planet Carlos Slim (Mexican Telecom) has expressed interest in investing in HSR. 

 

I would be careful disparaging Mexico's buses; There is nothing in the US like the clean, efficient, and affordable first class bus services that connect together the cities of Mexico. They connect large, well-organized central-city terminals that are more like small airports than American bus stations. 



#83 johnfwd

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 07:04 AM

Thanks for the Monterrey information.  Recalling the Trans-Texas Corridor, which grew out of NAFTA and is no longer a viable concept, it stopped at Laredo and did not venture into Mexico.  I  believe there may be international obstacles to HSR connecting the U.S. to Mexico.



#84 Electricron

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 01:09 PM

Thanks for the Monterrey information.  Recalling the Trans-Texas Corridor, which grew out of NAFTA and is no longer a viable concept, it stopped at Laredo and did not venture into Mexico.  I  believe there may be international obstacles to HSR connecting the U.S. to Mexico.

There probably are the same obstacles today.

 

But as I pointed out earlier, really fast HSR needs a city as large as Monterrey for a terminal at the southern end. Without as large a city, any proposals for 150-200 mph HSR train will probably not get pass the viability test. So, it has to be included for the study underway by TXDOT to have the slightest possibility of passing the viability test.

 

Border crossing concerns can be overcome, although it remains to be seen how easily. 

 

Before jumping on me, note I wrote really fast 150-200 mph HSR trains. It's an entirely  different story for 60-90 mph trains over existing freight tracks. 



#85 renamerusk

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 05:22 PM

A truth: HSR needs a large metropolitan city to terminate its trains at.


 

FYI = Houston metro population is 6,313,158

 

Let's face some facts, metro Laredo's population including both Laredo and Nuevo Laredo isn't large enough to terminate a HSR train, Monterrey is. Some might suggest San Antonio or Austin by themselves aren't. But most believe adding both San Antonio and Austin together will be sufficient population to terminate one end of a HSR corridor.   

 

Likewise, some don't believe OKC is large enough to terminate a HSR train. I'm not sure that adding Tulsa to that end is sufficient, although it should help. It depends upon whether one believes 2 million, 3 million, or 4 million is needed to at least pay for HSR operations and maintenance trains and tracks costs.  

 

I believe around 4 million is needed at each end of the line just by looking at the existing HSR lines around the world. And that's why planners are looking at terminating the I-35 HSR corridor in Monterrey, they already believe Laredo isn't large enough. 

 

 

I believe that your statistics are not the relevant determinant in the development of a regional HSR network.

 

Trains operate very differently then airplanes.  A Train line has  two terminals, one each at either end of the line; and there are multiples stations between the two terminals.  Viability is not largely determined by boardings at either terminals but is about the total passenger counts on and off from terminal to terminal.

 

If these three separate jurisdictions, State of Oklahoma, State of Texas and the Republic of Mexico were to collaborate in the development of HSR between one another, OK would insist upon the inclusion of Tulsa as the northern primary terminal and Monterrey would be the obvious southern primary terminal in Mexico.

 

The most direct line (main line) between OK and MEX via TEX is a route through Fort Worth, Temple/Bell County, Austin, San Antonio, and Laredo.  Obviously, TEX will insist upon including Dallas and Houston in the network.  Here is where a spur (line) from Fort Worth to Dallas will be built; and a spur (line) from San Antonio to Houston will be built.  Dallas and Houston would each be secondary terminals but this does not in anyway suggest that Dallas and Houston would not in actuality generate their share of ridership, in fact both will be the two largest generators of passenger boarding and disembarking.

 

Singling out Houston only demonstrate its importance as a destination, however, it is situated the farthest distance from the direct OK-MEX line and that fact makes it problematic but not impossible for it to be included in a regional network. 

 

The point to point model (Dallas to Houston)  which seems to be advocated by your numbers is far less viable and would have far less political support and was shown to pivotal in the derailing of the most recent attempt to develop HSR in Texas.

 

HSR will have to include most if not all of the major populations centers in Texas and Oklahoma for it to make it to the Rio Grande and beyond.



#86 Electricron

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 11:48 PM

HSR will have to include most if not all of the major populations centers in Texas and Oklahoma for it to make it to the Rio Grande and beyond.

 

You obviously haven't looked world wide for any examples of how a HSR line works.

Let's take Europe as an example.

There's a HSR line between London (population 13.6 million) and Paris (population 12 million) over 212 miles.

There's a HSR line between London (population 13.6 million) and Brussels (population 2million) over 194 miles.

In France, here are the existing HSR lines

1. LGV Sud-Est Paris (population 12 million) to Lyon (population 2.2 million) over 289 miles.

2. LGV Atlantique Paris (population 12 million) to Le Mans (population 293 thousand) over 129 miles. 

3. LGV Rhône-Alpes Lyon (population 2.2 million) to Valence (population 62 thousand) over 66 miles.

Note: This line is also used by trains heading to Marseille

4. LGV Nord Paris (population 12 million) to Calais (population 72 thousand) over 146 miles.

Note: This line is also used by trains heading to both London (Eurostar) and Brussels (Thalys).

5. LGV Méditerranée Valence (population 62 thousand) to Marseille (population 1.7 million) over 115 miles.  

6. LGV Est Paris (population 12 million) to Strasbourg (population 885 thousand) over 248 miles. (first phase opened June 2007)

7. LGV Rhin-Rhône Lyon (population 2.2 million) to Basel (population 830 thousand) over 181 miles. (first phase opened  December 2011)

8. LGV Perpignan-Figueres Paris (population 12 million) to Barcelona (population 5 million) over 644 miles in 7 hours 25 minutes. 

There's a reason the lines are split up the way they are, that's how far the trains go generally. If you're wishing to travel by HSR from Paris to Marseille, there's usually a transfer in Lyon. The lines are basically the same as the train names. The farthest one can usually ride a HSR train within France is usually less than 300 miles (Paris to Lyon)

Let's compare the city populations and distances for an I-35 line through Texas.

DFW (6.4 million) to OKC (1.3 million) over 194 miles.

DFW  (6.4 million) to Waco (260 thousand) over 112 miles.

Waco (260 thousand) to Austin (2 million) over 102 miles.

Austin (2 million) to San Antonio (2.2 million) over 80 miles.

San Antonio (2.2 million) to Laredo (636 thousand) over 156 miles.

Laredo (636 thousand) to Monterrey (4 million) over 143 miles.

Using that same 300 miles limitations along I-35, let's assume the main train runs between DFW and SA where the transfers to go further north or south will occur. If you wish to travel between OKC and Laredo, you'll have to take three trains with the aforementioned transfers in DFW and SA.

 

What I'm suggesting is that the distances are too great to include any city north of DFW and south of SA initially. The HSR system will have to work and stand on its own merits between them. I agree heading north of DFW will probably mean connected to both OKC and Tulsa, and heading south of SA will probably have to reach Monterrey. But those would be extensions off the main DFW and SA line (train). 



#87 renamerusk

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 11:11 AM

Fast Breaking News - WFAA is reporting that there is a meeting scheduled today, 6/30/15 to discuss a HSR Connector Route from Fort Worth to Dallas.  The meeting is being held in Irving. 

 

http://fortworthtexa...rail-connector/



#88 renamerusk

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 08:15 PM

--Without the Fort Worth to Dallas connection, there is not a viable statewide HSR system -

 

http://www.fortworth...8b1da38280.html



#89 fortworthhorn

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 09:16 PM

--Without the Fort Worth to Dallas connection, there is not a viable statewide HSR system -

 

http://www.fortworth...8b1da38280.html

Thanks for the post.  Did bring a smile to my face.



#90 RD Milhollin

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 11:03 PM

Glad to see that leaders and money are taking this part of the idea of Texas HSR seriously. I am still very interested in hearing more about HSR connecting to Monterrey NL. The big picture should include the DFW area as an anchor for a system that would connect to Chicago through OKC, Tulsa, and St. Louis, and to Atlanta through Shreveport, Jackson, and Birmingham. The rest of the Eastern US will be able to connect through those hubs. Acela-type trains should someday be able to connect from here to Denver and on to SF and El Paso and on to LA. Maybe not if the water in between runs out...



#91 renamerusk

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 11:04 AM

Glad to see that leaders and money are taking this part of the idea of Texas HSR seriously. I am still very interested in hearing more about HSR connecting to Monterrey NL...[Chicago, Shreveport, etc, etc, etc]

 

Yes, I am glad also for the report and the assurance that it gives to a comprehensive HSR strategy for the Tri-state region of Oklahoma, Texas and Nuevo Leon (Mex).  This collaboration is the best opportunity for HSR going forward as the three jurisdictions will be able to levy fees and gain federal funds more readily to subsidize the construction of the system than other strategies being put forward. Investors understand this as well as the European interests who have a long and successful experience working with national governments.

 

I do not see a HSR system beyond these three states in the near future that includes the states of Louisiana and Arkansas as there has not been publicly voiced interest shown by either to this point; however, I do see Texas extending service to El Paso and points in between from the Dallas terminal.

 

As for the Texas' most strategic HSR hubs, one is Fort Worth and the other is Austin - sometimes referred to as the T-Bone.



#92 RD Milhollin

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 08:33 AM

More "pennies" being thrown at the Texas HSR proposal:

 

http://www.star-tele...le32970186.html

 

Latest public infusions will offset studies to gauge potential ridership on the Fort Worth-Dallas segment. The routing for the Dallas-Houston segment is set to follow electric transmission lines. Thanks to S-T reporter Gordon Dickson for keeping High Speed Rail developments in front of the public.

 

I am still unconvinced that there should be a HSR stop in Arlington. If there has to be a station there, Arlington and the regional rail authorities should be tasked with developing a north/south commuter or Light Rail line to meet there and connect points south with the Arlington core and north to the TRE and on to DFW Airport. The airport should probably be given a heads-up to include plans for a rail station when they renovate (or more likely replace) Terminal C. All the trains serving DFW should eventually be available from one point in the airport and some conveyance available from there to all the terminals. There may be a need for the new intersection of I-30 and SH-360 to have accommodations for rail lines passing through, E-W and maybe even N-S. Perhaps if the French HS rail operator is interested in getting involved they could be sold a partnership in a OK City-FtW-Austin-SanAntonio-MonterreyNL line.



#93 PeopleAreStrange

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 06:35 PM

^ ^ ^ No stops in Arlington, please. People are confusing HSR with commuter rail. HSR is supposed to be a long distance intercity train between metro areas, not for commuting between suburb and city. Fares will be too high for that, and it will slow down people travelling from Fort Worth to Houston.


- Dylan


#94 Austin55

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 07:10 PM

2 stops is already to many in DFW.



#95 JBB

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 07:13 PM

Especially for a rail line that will never be built.

#96 RD Milhollin

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 10:30 PM

I feel that that history and current trends dictate that this sort of rail will HAVE TO BE BUILT at some point, perhaps not this time around, but if not now, the cost to future taxpayers will be much more onerous. The projected urban populations of DFW and Houston will simply not be able to be served by roads, and the cost of air transportation between the two metropolitan areas will only increase over time as efficient ground transportation costs will remain fairly stable after the necessary infrastructure is in place. We are becoming more like Europe and Asia and less like Africa and Australia.



#97 renamerusk

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 08:03 AM

2 stops is already to many in DFW.

 

If true, where do you put the 1 stop?



#98 Electricron

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:40 PM

Glad to see that leaders and money are taking this part of the idea of Texas HSR seriously. I am still very interested in hearing more about HSR connecting to Monterrey NL. Acela-type trains should someday be able to connect from here to Denver and on to SF and El Paso and on to LA. Maybe not if the water in between runs out...

Everywhere in the world, let me repeat that once again, EVERYWHERE - HSR trains travel a maximum distance around 300 miles. 

 

Dallas to El Paso is 631 miles.

Dallas to Denver is 795 miles.

Denver to San Francisco is 1254 miles.

El Paso to Los Angeles is 805 miles. 

Every one of your HSR destinations is much too far. 

 

Why is 300 miles the maximum? Staffing is the main reason.

Crew arrives at the train yard to man the train. 0 hours

Crew performs initial inspection of systems upon starting the train 0.5 hours

Train leaves train yard and pulls into station 0.75 hours

Passengers board the train  1.25 hours

Train leaves initial station. 1.33 hours

Train runs 300 miles or so average 150 mph. 3.33 hours

Passengers alight from the train. 3.83 hours

Passengers board the train. 4.33 hours

Train leaves station for the return trip. 4.40 hours

Train runs another 300 miles. 6.40 hours

Passengers alight from the train. 6.90 hours

Train leaves station and pulls into train yard. 7.15 hours

Crew shutdowns trains and performs final inspection. 7.45 hours

Crew ends workday and goes home. 8.00 hours

 

Are my timeline estimations accurate for a typical workday for the crew? I don't have the slightest idea. The point of this exercise is to point out that there is more to running a train than just traveling between stations with passengers aboard the train. That crews like to go home to their families every day, just like you. :smwink:  Therefore, there is a real, operations based, finite distance that HSR trains normally run.  :excl: 

 

To reach El Paso with a HSR train, there needs to be a large city around 300 miles east of it, or west of Dallas. Midland/Odessa aren't large enough to terminate and originate true HSR trains. 

 

Don't forget a very important truth based on physics and science;

Time = Distance no matter how fast you are going.

There are operational limits based upon them. 



#99 renamerusk

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 11:19 PM

Everywhere in the world, let me repeat that once again, EVERYWHERE - HSR trains travel a maximum distance around 300 miles....

 

Dallas to El Paso is 631 miles.

Dallas to Denver is 795 miles.

Denver to San Francisco is 1254 miles.

El Paso to Los Angeles is 805 miles. 

Every one of your HSR destinations is much too far.

 

 

What! :blink:

 

http://www.hsr.ca.gov/Programs/Statewide_Rail_Modernization/Project_Sections/index.html 



#100 Electricron

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 11:38 PM

Well, using California to prove my point!

San Francisco to Los Angeles = 382 miles

Sacramento to Los Angeles = 384 miles

Los Angeles to San Diego = 120 miles

382 miles is slightly too long for my timetable,  but it isn't as far as the  600 or more miles to reach El Paso.

There's several large cities in between as well

San Jose metro = 1,664,496

Fresno metro = 654,628

Bakersfield metro =  523,994

So, there are cities in California with HSR stations of opportunities for a train crew to depart a train and catch a second train back to their home base, if needed. And it is also possible that California might use 4 days of 10 hours vs 5 days of 8 hours as their normal workweek. 

So Time = Distance limitations for HSR are still in effect. 






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