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What Is This? Survey Markers? I Have No Clue...


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#1 txrob779

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 08:47 AM

I stopped to take a pic of what I think is a late 1800's homesite. Specifically the cistern which I have a fancy with when I noticed this, Staright away I recognized the concrete composition as early 19th century. Like some bridges and other structures I have seen that look like the same kind of concrete. So, I snapped this picture wondering what it was?C0C7E904-B46C-417B-9510-152EE6946AF3-188

Then, I walked about 2 yards south and found this D45028D2-857C-4F94-9787-F365738BF4F5-188

 

 

The location is on Hwy171N right past where FM51 merges 171 at Old Airport Rd. just inside Weatherford City Limits on the west side next to a white limestone gravel gas well road/gate. You can see the cistern a 100yards inside the property but this marker is clearly right there next to the gate.

 

 

 

Thanks for lookin' at my thread.

 

 

Robbie



#2 John T Roberts

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 09:57 AM

Robbie, I was just by there yesterday morning on bicycle.



#3 AndyN

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:05 PM

I happened to drive by that location on Saturday night on the way back from Cresson but did not see that specific gate as it was dark. The first photo is a typical highway right-of-way monument that delineates the width of the right-of-way. There is a curve that runs near there and also a backslope easement but I don't think the easements are normally monumented so it is probably the row marker at the point of curvature. The right-of-way map dates to December of 1931 and the concrete monument was probably set within a few months of the map being issued. The road used to have a jog to the east as it crossed the creek slightly north of your marker but with the 1931 project, 2.45 acres of new right-of-way (and 0.556 acres of backslope easement) were acquired from Louis De Beauford and the road was straightened, with the exception of a gentle 0°55' Degree curve.

 

Not sure what the second marker is. It seems a little useless as a boundary marker since I do not see a center point.

 

T. Andy Nold, Registered Professional Land Surveyor


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#4 txrob779

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 02:09 PM

Sweet Andy thanks a ton. I have been on a research bender along the stretch of 171 since I ran across the history of the Gulf, Colorado & Sante Fe line that ran from Cleburne thru Godley, then Cresson and into Weatherford. With a switching station at Parson Station. You can clearly follow the railroad bed almost all the way to this location. If you look east at Bear Creek (Moncrief Ranch) you can see an old stone cattle barn and cistern right on the old railroad bed (gas well road now). From the SAT view you can also see the foot print of the switch right up to that barn. and a felled windmill that pumped into the cistern. The sintersection of Old Airport Rd. & Causbie you can look south and see the railroad bed as it must have worked it's way into downtown Weatherford. They called the old train that ran from Godley to Weatherford the, "Old Nancy" I think.

 

Here are some pic I took along the way yesterday.

 

4F6D35EB-C1C5-465D-B642-922FBEC18C55-188

F27D973E-E2C9-422F-A69E-45E340386AF0-188

D2D70847-B6BE-41EA-B90E-780A96DD6A78-188

Old Gulf, Colorado & Sante Fe railroad bed

 

0B5A9A9F-2F7F-4C5A-A9C0-B70631C7C4FA-188

9EBC8E44-CF8A-4FC3-B549-0C53162CF810-188

 

 

2DDCD37B-04D7-4A54-990E-0852ED51A985-188

The Moncrief Ranch railroad bed to the switch

996C4374-87F4-486A-8128-93318C1A07B9-188

565910A5-F73F-47B6-A94C-342A7121462B-188

The old livestock pens for loading to Cleburne



#5 txrob779

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 02:11 PM

hmmm cant see squat lol



#6 txrob779

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 02:39 PM

Oh I forgot to add that the State Of Texas finished HWY171 in 1932/33 I think. It was about this time Sante Fe decided to close the line from Cresson to Weatherford. I asume the removal of the rails and ties began sometime after that.

 

Interesting notes:

 

In 1904 the Trinity and Brazos Valley Railway built through the area, connecting the community with Cleburne to the west and Hillsboro to the east.

No established community developed until the 1880s. A post office called Nathan operated there from 1887 to 1906.

Railroad special trains made stops at Godley for that activity and “Doc” Thrower the regular conductor on the run from Cleburne to Weatherford via Godley and Cresson is said, to have named the passenger train, “The Nancy Hanks”, after a famous racehorse at Godley.
Situated on the western route into Johnson County on highway #171, like other towns along good highway systems, Godley is growing at a rapid rate. The last cattle drive in Texas originated out of Godley in 1966 and being on a feeder trail of the Chisholm Trail assures Godley a place in western history.

in 1887, the Santa Fe ran a line from Weatherford to Cleburne.

Today the rail line out of Cleburne through Godley goes as far as Cresson, where it connects with the main line out of Fort Worth. This line goes on to Brownwood and points west. 

No rail line goes to Weatherford, but you can see an old, raised railroad bed on the east side of the highway between Cresson and Weatherford.

the train that ran on the Weatherford to Cleburne line was known as a cattle train. There was a town between Weatherford and Cresson known as Parsons Station. There were cattle pens at Parsons Station where area ranchers brought their cattle so they could be loaded on the train and shipped to Cleburne. From Cleburne they could be shipped to many different markets.

Thedford also told me that a historical marker had been placed near the site of Parsons Station that would give more information.

After leaving Weatherford I found the marker about midway between Weatherford and Cresson. The marker had been placed there in 2006, but I had not noticed it on previous trips to Weatherford.

Amsley Parsons settled in this area with his family in 1854. Sam B. Kutch was another early settler in the area, and it was his land that the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe rail line crossed on its way from Weatherford to Cresson and on to Cleburne. This line was built in 1887

A settlement developed in the area of the Parsons/Kutch homesteads. In 1888 the residents requested a post office in the name of Woodstock, but this name was denied by postal service officials. The name was then changed to Parsons Station. 

In the 1880s there were many ranches in southern Parker, northwest Johnson and Northeast Hood Counties. Parsons Station was centrally located as a shipping point for the cattle from these ranches.

In addition to being a rail stop, Parsons Community had a rail switching station and offices for telegraph, Western Union and Wells Fargo Services. There were also cattle pens for loading livestock of area ranchers onto rail cars for shipment to Cleburne. There was also a school here named Paradise and a grocery store.

 

According to the historical marker, the train that made the trip from Weatherford to Cleburne was known as Old Nancy Hanks, or Old Nancy, reportedly for a famous horse belonging to Abraham Lincoln’s mother. 

Nancy Hanks Lincoln was Abraham Lincoln’s mother. I found nothing about her owning a famous horse. But according to Wikipedia, a Central of Georgia Railway passenger train running between Atlanta and Savannah, the Nancy Hanks, was named for a race horse that was named for Abraham Lincoln’s mother. 

Old Nancy was basically a cattle train, but passengers often hopped aboard for rides.

In 1931, the county began construction on what became Texas 171. The highway followed the route of the railway. The road’s completion led to a decline in rail use and the ultimate end to Old Nancy’s route. 

After the rail was removed from Cresson to Weatherford, Santa Fe continued to use the line from Cleburne to Cresson to connect with the main line from Fort Worth west. By the 1980s Santa Fe had just about discontinued use of this track. The line lay unused for several years.

 

*no real mention of the still standing livestock pen....



#7 John T Roberts

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:24 PM

I think it is interesting is that I have ridden out there several times and I never picked up on the old railroad bed.  I crossed it twice yesterday near Old Airport Rd. and Causbie and on Bear Creek Road, just east of 171.



#8 GenE

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:34 PM

I stopped to take a pic of what I think is a late 1800's homesite. Specifically the cistern which I have a fancy with when I noticed this, Staright away I recognized the concrete composition as early 19th century. Like some bridges and other structures I have seen that look like the same kind of concrete. So, I snapped this picture wondering what it was?C0C7E904-B46C-417B-9510-152EE6946AF3-188

 

Thanks for lookin' at my thread.

 

 

Robbie

 

 

What jumps out at me, is that I think the darker green plant with the very narrow leaves right next to the bottom of the cement post (on the left as you look at the post in the picture) is Cat Claw Sensitive Briar.   If you touch the leaves, they will close up.

 

Really neat thing to show your child or grandchild.



#9 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 10:54 PM

There used to be an obelisk like that in the green space between 377 and Highway Drive in Wycliff. Years and years ago I came across another such obelisk that was no longer attached to the ground just beyond the end of Mary's Creek Drive where there had even longer ago been a low water crossing. Down one side it bore the letters

           E

           S

           C

           R

           O

 

           R

           O

           W

 

Never have figured that one out.



#10 txrob779

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:52 AM

I think it is interesting is that I have ridden out there several times and I never picked up on the old railroad bed.  I crossed it twice yesterday near Old Airport Rd. and Causbie and on Bear Creek Road, just east of 171.

Same here John...Being in Godley and my daughters living with their mom right there off Causbie, I had driven that hwy171 route a 1000 times and never paid attention to the railroad bed. It wasn't until I started my personal history quest that I read somewhere that the raised beds can be seen and I have been obsessed with it ever since. However, just past that Parsons Station marker the bed bends east and doesnt re-appear until that Beer Creek spot. I wonder where it goes.



#11 AndyN

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 07:49 AM

There used to be an obelisk like that in the green space between 377 and Highway Drive in Wycliff. Years and years ago I came across another such obelisk that was no longer attached to the ground just beyond the end of Mary's Creek Drive where there had even longer ago been a low water crossing. Down one side it bore the letters

           E

           S

           C

           R

           O

 

           R

           O

           W

 

 

If it said "TESCO ROW" that might have been a marker for Texas Electric Service Company. They used concrete markers too on occasion.


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#12 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 02:40 PM

It's been so long that for all I can remember it might have been ESCO ROW but I'm pretty sure there was no T. Could have been at the top and broken off, though.

 

In fact, I think now it probably was TESCO. I'm sure it was unbroken, a perfect George Washington Monument Egyptian-style obelisk, only two feet tall and not where it was supposed to be.



#13 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 05:45 PM

8907103626_b7f4a61625_n.jpg

 

This is a benchmark on the bridge on Mary's Creek Drive over the creek that runs through North Z Boaz Park into Mary's Creek. The years are "1938-1939". The elevation seems never to have been struck into the box after "ELEV."



#14 txrob779

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 05:52 PM

Hmmm notice the similarities to that 1900-1940'ish concrete composition?



#15 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 07:03 PM

Something else I just came across: http://www.waymarkin...er_Arlington_Tx

 

I wonder how many there were and how many are still around. I wonder if there's still an old list of them moldering away in a dusty old file cabinet or box in the deepest bowels of the county archives.






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