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Fort Worth not "hip" enough?


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#1 johnfwd

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:55 AM

Thought about putting this in the miscellaneous thread where it probably deserves to belong.  Maybe an issue for some.  Article by Robert Frances in the Business Press below is about an odd-ball survey ranking Fort Worth as the third least "hip" city in the country (whatever that means).  Walkability seems to be a factor, as is drinking latte I suppose.  Guess we-all had better turn in our boots for some fancy Italian loafers.

 

http://www.fwbusines...ArticleID=26078



#2 Doohickie

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:38 AM

I don't care what someone else thinks about my city.  I like it just fine.


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#3 Papaw

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 10:35 AM

Did the term 'hippie" come from being "hip"?  Or maybe Robert Frances was refering to the noun "hip" in which case he must not have visited our Walmarts. :blush:



#4 John S.

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 12:52 PM

Another worthless "survey", IMO. The number of vegetarian restaurants is one of the criteria? C'mon, now...this is Fort Worth, home of the Stockyards, Cowboys (not organic vegetable farmers) and Culture, with our own city herd of Longhorn Cattle. No, we don't have scores or even hundreds of unemployed 20-somethings hanging out at the parks in-between "occupy" protests or young crowds loitering around coffee shops. Our artists aren't starving either. I've been to so-called "hipster" places like Portland, OR, San Francisco, Sedona, AZ,(actually too posh to be hip)  Austin...et al.  I judge the value of a place by how satisfied the residents are and Fort Worth seems to rank pretty high in most categories. If the number of new residents is any indication of popularity I think a lot of people are voting for Fort Worth with their feet. Fort Worth is cool/hip/trendy in its own unique way. People here, by and large, are friendly too and that factor has to count for something. We have a "hip" mayor too who is into bicycling, walking, and making our city a more beautiful place. Our downtown is vibrant and if the construction dust ever settles, with our town lake and newly redeveloped areas, I don't think anyone will have to apologize for not being hip enough. Or, put another way, the hipness factor does not necessarily correlate with the quality of life. Most folks concentrate on the latter and only a certain age demographic is obsessed with hipness.



#5 David Love

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:01 PM

I think the Metroplex creates it's own version of hipsters, there are various flavors and the Metroplex is overflowing with them. The Jersey Shore flavors make me laugh, don't they understand people in Jersey make fun of them.


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#6 ramjet

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:56 PM

I suppose Austin is considered hip.  And the hippest thing here might be SXSW.  But as a downtown Austin dweller, if hip is what I experienced down here last week as a result of SXSW, be glad Fort Worth is on the un-hip list.  The young-ish swill of a crowd decked in skinny jeans, Warby Parker eyeglasses, severe bed-head, and way too much attitude absolutely trashed downtown during the festival.  On my walk to the office this morning, the streets and public spaces looked like there had been riots in them overnight.  I think I will be joining many of the locals and heading out of town this time next year.  Maybe to El Paso!



#7 David Love

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:59 PM

The thing about hipsters, the second you define something as hipster, they want nothing to do with it. They spend hours prepping to go out wearing retreaded jorts and whatever foot ware and sunglasses are popular on their shared viewing experience of the month.

 

So the key ingredient to attract hipsters to any location is to state “there aren’t any hipsters there."

 

I think the key thing to define a hipster is the incredible amount of time they spend trying to be unique to their location without ostracizing their pier group.

 

I guess the anti-hipster could be defined as your typical frat pack you see out and about in any college town, those trying desperately to fit it, somewhere.


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#8 Jeriat

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:29 PM

I can understand how people here can blow this list off and all, and that's fine.... 

But even in a stupid list like this, how is OKC more "hip" than we are? Seriously? 


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#9 JBB

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:50 PM

That's what happens when you try to use objective statistics to quantify a subjective label.

#10 David Love

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:24 PM

I can understand how people here can blow this list off and all, and that's fine.... 

But even in a stupid list like this, how is OKC more "hip" than we are? Seriously? 

 

I think the key thing to note is that being defined as hip, isn't.

 

Those that truly are, don't care.


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#11 renamerusk

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:36 PM

Fort Worth has that unlikeness or as one might say in french: "le difference".

 

And since we have been bestowing "gold stars" lately, at least the Movoto Blog had the good sense to separate Fort Worth from Dallas.

 

Keep Fort Worth folksy



#12 ramjet

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:18 PM

Perhaps the 10 cities on the list should start a marketing campaign together:

 

Don't watch Portlandia?

Don't wear skinny jeans out of respect for your rear end?

Don't know what "Blond" coffee is?

Don't use apps to get "lucky?"

Eat food that has a face?

Scratch your head at the concept of an electric car?

Think mass transit is best suited for Six Flags?  (OK, I'll get s#@t for that.)

Wear glasses that are not bigger than half your face?

Bathe, shave, and get haircuts regularly?

Laugh at the idea of actually buying weekly groceries at Whole Foods?

 

Come visit the Union of the Unhip Cities - and enjoy a hot dog and a baseball game!



#13 Jeriat

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:53 PM

Don't wear skinny jeans out of respect for your rear end?


You're rear end? 

With skinny jeans, I'd think there would be another part of your body you'd have to have much more "respect" for than anything.... 


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#14 beverlyb

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:02 PM

OMG! I had to Google one of the items on the list. Vinyl Store. Since when did vinyl become "hip"?

 

I think Fort Worth is plenty hip, groovy, or just plain ole off the chain.



#15 Doohickie

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:19 AM

The thing about hipsters, the second you define something as hipster, they want nothing to do with it. They spend hours prepping to go out wearing retreaded jorts and whatever foot ware and sunglasses are popular on their shared viewing experience of the month.
 
Did you hear about the hipster who burned his mouth?  He ate his pizza before it was cool...
 
 
I have a certain exposure to what probably passes as "hipster culture" in Fort Worth through my association with the Night Riders.  We ride our bikes at night (get it?)  Anyway, Sunday night rides are a pub crawl where we go to dive bars and drink cheap beer or alternately go to hip bars and drink overpriced beer.  I haven't gotten into too much more than that, but they have barter meets, do home canning, raise their own chickens, go to heavy metal clubs, are heavily tattooed, brew their own beer, etc.  Only a few of the crowd are the stereotypical hipster that is snobbish about everything that has become cool because their too cool for that.  Mostly, I see a lot of people realizing that how their parents generation (ahem.... me) lived is not how they want to live and they're trying new things, many of which are actually old things.  Home, hearth and community seem to be pretty important to the "hipsters" that are raising families.  Maybe that's not hip to the outside world, but they are trying to have the best quality of life they can conjure on a limited budget.
 
When I was that age, it was the 1980s Me Generation thing going on.  I think the transition from Me to Community isn't necessarily a bad thing. And maybe it's a deeper form of "hip" that the survey doesn't pick up on. You want to go somewhere to party that'll get documented on all the best blogs? Go to SXSW. Want to have a good quality of life all year round? Live in Ft. Worth.
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#16 Fort Worthology

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:39 AM

OMG! I had to Google one of the items on the list. Vinyl Store. Since when did vinyl become "hip"?

 

Quite a while ago, actually.  A huge amount of the people I know in my age bracket & younger buy vinyl records all the time.  It's a nice deal, because the vast majority of new vinyl comes with a download code for a digital copy as well.  You get the best of both worlds - the convenience & portability of digital and the physicality, artwork, vintagey sound, and overall coolness of a record, all for one price.  It's how I try to buy the majority of my music these days, especially when it's from an indie band.  I just came back from a trip to Austin performing at SXSW, and between the members of my band we came home with probably seven or eight brand-new records, some bought directly from the bands themselves and some at Waterloo Records.  Day-to-day, I listen to music on my iPhone, but when I really want to sit down and soak in some music I love to crank up the big speakers and throw on some vinyl and have all the huge artwork and such to enjoy.

 

I'd love a great record store in a walkable/bikeable location here in FW.  (I like Doc's, just not the location.  Give me a record store on Magnolia or South Main, right where I can walk or use the bike lanes, and I'd be in heaven.)


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#17 Doohickie

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:48 AM

Hipster sighting ^

 

;)


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#18 NSFW

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:24 AM

Yes, I wish Doc's wasn't so far. 


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#19 Fort Worthology

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:07 AM

Hipster sighting ^

 

;)

 

Hey now - my jeans are not skin tight and I stay reasonably clean shaven while performing my hipster indie rock.   :)

 

I do like my bicycle, walking, vinyl records, and I'm vegan (which should get me run out of "Cowtown" according to this thread, I guess).  But I still like bands after they get popular, as long as the new songs are still good.   :)


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#20 Doohickie

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:38 AM

But I still like bands after they get popular, as long as the new songs are still good.   :)

 

I think that's my point... if you want to call the 20-30-something crowd centered in Fairmount the "hipster population of Fort Worth" and look at them closely, you see that it's more substance than image.  If you want to look at appearances, maybe Ft. Worth hipsters don't measure up.  If you look at the actual community, you'll see a concern with quality of life that supersedes any concern with outward appearances.  To the extent that the appearances conform to the expected hipster norm, it's more of a question of of comfort and utility than style. 

 

Take, for instance, the oft-maligned skinny jeans:  For those who use a bicycle for real transportation, tight cuffs prevent pant legs from getting grease stains on them.  From what I've heard, the original "skinny jeans" were actually women's jeans with a little stretch and a little hip room, but a tight lower leg, strictly for the function of comfort while riding a bicycle, and avoiding that chain grease.  Someone who's been riding in SUVs for and hasn't ridden a bicycle since they were a kid  doesn't appreciate this functionality and instead just pokes fun.  The guy riding the bike gets the last laugh as the SUVers decend premature Type II diabetes.


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#21 cberen1

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:17 PM

I've never thought that trying to be unique was a good strategy.  Fort Worth just needs to keep being what Fort Worth is.  Don't define it or label it too much.  Definitely don't worry about it very much.  Accentuate the things you think are good and work to eliminate the things you think are bad.



#22 johnfwd

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:20 PM

The Movo.com website featuring this silly survey has a picture and caption next to each of the top 10 least hip cities.  As you can read here, the comment about Fort Worth has me a bit puzzled.   Does anyone know what this means, what the point is?

 

3. Fort Worth, TX: Residents of Fort Worth understand the importance of wearing plaid sparingly. 
Source: Flickr user bunchofpants



#23 ramjet

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:51 PM

After reading the article:

 

http://www.movoto.co...hipster-cities/

 

I realized the author is actually making fun of hipsters and their accoutrements - not the other way around.  Which makes the cities on this list the cool kids after all???  (My favorite comments are on Indianapolis and Memphis.)  The second paragraph under the pics explains the plaid reference.



#24 Austin55

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:33 PM

Aahaha, That was a nice little article.

 

btw, spend some time along 7th. It's pretty hip over there. Maybe even moreso on Mag.

 

Our resident southsider has a blog. And a Band. And cool glasses. And rides a bike. And is a photographer. And has cool glasses. How do you get more hip than that?



#25 Russ Graham

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 03:59 PM

oh man... I had to delete my post from yesterday.  it's indeed a jokey article... lesson learned - spend more than 20 seconds reading the article before responding!  It's a joke ranking of "where to avoid annoying hipsters", not "what cities are hip"... :blush:



#26 Fort Worthology

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:53 AM


Our resident southsider has a blog. And a Band. And cool glasses. And rides a bike. And is a photographer. And has cool glasses. How do you get more hip than that?

 

Don't forget "and is vegan."  :)

 

For real, though, I'd call the Near Southside easily the hippest part of the central city.  But as Doohickie says, it's a sort of laid-back hipness.


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#27 Doohickie

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:02 AM

The recent yarnbombing is a nice touch. And now our Dive Bar is an Artsy Dive Bar.
 
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#28 Austin55

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 11:41 AM

Magnolia hipsters are like those real hipsters who aren't hipsters for the sake of being hipsters. 

 

Oh god what am I doing to myself.



#29 Carterville

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 06:29 AM

I'll take being a city of world-class art museums over being a Portland or Austin-Lite.  That said, it is nice to have those pockets of "hip"-ness like on Magnolia...it means more beer choices!  Plus, Fort Worth hipsters are laid back...kind of like Fort Worthians as a whole.  Their attitude seems to be, "We're hip yet comfortable enough with ourselves to not be obnoxious about it." 



#30 cjyoung

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 12:19 PM

I wouldn't ever consider us the "lite" version of any city, especially super hip and weird  :glare: Austin. I love my visits to Austin but I think the whole hipster thing is both corny and overblown.



#31 Now in Denton

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 11:03 AM

One suvey ranked Dallas as religious.Fort Worth did not even rank ?  Fort Worth is home of the world larget seminary. SWBTS ?

 

P.S. I don't have a problem with guys in skinny jeans. I was a teen in the 80's. We also wore tight striaght leg jeans. And in the 60's.Yes More skinny jeans .( My three son's TV show)They called them drainpipes back then. And yet somehow. The world keped going .And guys still were able to have kids! I'm just saying.



#32 Dismuke

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:39 PM

I've never thought that trying to be unique was a good strategy.  Fort Worth just needs to keep being what Fort Worth is.  Don't define it or label it too much.  Definitely don't worry about it very much.  Accentuate the things you think are good and work to eliminate the things you think are bad.

 

I think that is the correct approach.

 

One should should be authentic - not strive to be things like "hip" or "trendy."

 

A person who is authentic neither rushes toward something nor avoids it just because it happens to be considered hip or trendy.  If he considers it to be interesting and appealing he participates.  If not, not.  How many people happen to feel the same way isn't something that even enters his realm of consideration.

 

it is easy to recognize that a person who goes out of his way to be "trendy" is a conformist.   But a person who blindly rebels against something because it happens to be trendy in order to be "unique" is every bit as much of a conformist - it is just that his mindless, knee jerk relationship to the trend is negative instead of positive.

 

As I mentioned in a different thread, anyone who basis his success or self-worth based on what others do or think is in for a lifetime of heartbreak.

 

This means that, for an emotionally healthy person, being "hip" or "trendy" will usually be something that other people are - not one's self.   And if, in the course of going about your life and pursuing your interests and values it just so happens that you discover other people regard you as "trendy" or "hip" - enjoy it and capitalize on it while it lasts because that which is trendy or hip today will soon enough be regarded as the exact opposite.   If you are authentic, you will have an appeal that will always endure no matter what the trends of the moment are - and it will appeal to the kind of people you actually like.

 

A city is no different.  Just as no person can be all things to all people neither can a city.  Those that try will never succeed - and instead of creating the impression they hope for they will most likely just be regarded as being somewhat pathetic.  Be authentic and base your appraisal of your strengths, weaknesses and opportunities for improvement on what is important to you, not other people.  If other people don't like it - to heck with them!  You are the one who has to live your life - not them.   You are the one who lives and/or works in this city - not people who live elsewhere or only visit it on occasion, if at all. 

 

Great cities are not great because they are "hip" or "trendy" but because they have substance and an authenticity that is timeless and enduring.  Think of the world's great cities - and chances are that which makes them great cities are similar to the things that made them great cities 25 years ago as well.  

 

Sometimes being authentic is easier said than done.  When a person is very young, he has yet to fully "find himself" and it is normal to be curious about different lifestyles and subcultures.  Same with a city that is either very young or is experiencing rapid growth - it tends to look at what is available elsewhere but lacking locally.  It is a healthy process.  Pick and choose the things you like and don't worry about what other people think.  From that will come a uniqueness that is authentic and not contrived.

 

So often when something is deemed "hip" that which follows is mostly contrived - you see a whole bunch of pathetic little zombies all rushing to "fit in" and conform to certain expectations.  I am not criticizing any particular subculture - those who participated in a subculture before it became "hip" and those that will remain when it no longer is are probably authentic.  And I am not criticizing those who casually participate and take in a hip scene as an escape from the ordinary and a way of doing something different in a way similar to how another person might put on Western clothes and visit the Stockyards.  I am talking about those who try to be hip.   I am talking about the person who disowns certain things that he used to value, used to be interested in and, deep down still does, because they don't conform.  I am talking about the person who suppresses certain opinions and beliefs that he used to hold, and deep down still does, because the people he is trying to impress and fit in with will disapprove or possibly even look down on him.   That is formula for a very sad life.  Even if he succeeds in what he is trying to do - he will still fail because the things which those other people approve of and are impressed by aren't his real self but rather a charade.   Meanwhile, his real self is locked away in a prison of his own creation - and those people in the world who would have been capable of appreciating it will never get to know it ever existed.  Sadly, such is the path that is heavily pushed by today's pop culture - a pop culture that, even when it preaches "rebellion," still demands abject, mindless conformity in terms of how the so-called "rebels" dress, think and behave.

 

So my suggestion to any city and any person is "be real - not hip."  Be who you are - be authentic.  Being authentic requires integrity - and, on occasion, a willingness to endure a certain amount of hostility from those who have sold their souls and hate you because, on some level, they recognize that you haven't.   But it is worth it.


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#33 McHand

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 09:38 PM

I suppose Austin is considered hip.  And the hippest thing here might be SXSW.  But as a downtown Austin dweller, if hip is what I experienced down here last week as a result of SXSW, be glad Fort Worth is on the un-hip list.  The young-ish swill of a crowd decked in skinny jeans, Warby Parker eyeglasses, severe bed-head, and way too much attitude absolutely trashed downtown during the festival.  On my walk to the office this morning, the streets and public spaces looked like there had been riots in them overnight.  I think I will be joining many of the locals and heading out of town this time next year.  Maybe to El Paso!

 

Hey, maybe we could house swap.  I'm always looking to play SW   :swg: 

 

Just to throw my two cents in, before I read the rest of the thread, Fort Worth is a town for grown ups.  In the 10 years I've lived here, and especially since we've had a family, there's been a lot of stability in my circle of friends.  And I have a lot of single and non married friends who may (or may not) have options to move elsewhere.  Either way, I don't hear a lot of complaining, and longing to move, and I do hear a lot of gushing about FW.

 

I do of course hear a little complaining, and here's some of my own: Would I like a little more walkable places? Yes, but what does that mean in the land of a 1000 summer suns?  Covered walkways? (Hey, there's an idea...) 

But I digress.  

Fort Worth is a great fit for me and my family.  People here are determined and more than just talk.  Things happen. And it happens without all the pretense and money that other places get, which makes it even more amazing.


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#34 McHand

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 10:14 PM

Aahaha, That was a nice little article.

 

btw, spend some time along 7th. It's pretty hip over there. Maybe even moreso on Mag.

 

Our resident southsider has a blog. And a Band. And cool glasses. And rides a bike. And is a photographer. And has cool glasses. How do you get more hip than that?

 

 a band with 3 WOMEN.

 

case closed.

 

:roflol:


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#35 Papaw

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 10:55 PM

I feel that there is a change in Fort Worth's citizens from what was that of 20 years or so ago. In the better days you seldow saw piercied body parts and tattoos and fewer males with facial hair.  Most people would always wear a smile and speek to strangers like they would friends.  When you passed someone there was usually an exchange of kindly words and if you saw a piece of paper or trash on the ground you would pick it up.  Neighbors knew each other and often spoke and shared gosip.  Most people respected religion and would honor discussions and debates on politics.  It seemed people were more focused on the good and health of society in geneal.  Today people seem to want personal recognition and to be noticed by others by way of their dressing, hairdos, arm bracelets, jewelery, hats, bumper stickers, and facebook broadcasts.  Being retired, I don't get out as much as when working but this past week I had to go to the Apple store on University to get a cell phone speaker replaced and I was shocked by the Apple staff.  The wild hairdoos, and colors, piercing, and wearing shorts while on the job.  Friday I went through Central Market and the weirdos were wall to wall. 

Used to, people worked for a living and you wouldn't see the fruit cases until after hours or weekends but now they roam the city all day.  What do these people do for a living?  We used to never hear of black and whites dating (much less marrying) and if there were gays or lesbians around, you didnt talk about it but now it seems an "honor" or bragging point to be one and need for celebration if two of these decide to get married.

Is Fort Worth getting more "hip" or more "liberal"? 



#36 Dismuke

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:03 AM

 We used to never hear of black and whites dating (much less marrying) and if there were gays or lesbians around, you didnt talk about it but now it seems an "honor" or bragging point to be one and need for celebration if two of these decide to get married.

Is Fort Worth getting more "hip" or more "liberal"? 

 

 

Pawpaw - actually, I think it is that the culture, even among those who consider themselves "conservative," has become more "liberal" when it comes to social issues.   And as someone who is about as "conservative" as you can get when it comes to economic and fiscal issues, I say "thank goodness."  Personally,  I actually don't classify myself in terms of "conservative" or a "liberal."  I am an individualist - and, as a result of that, people tend to consider me "conservative" on fiscal issues and "liberal" on social issues.   And I think there are a lot more people than most would suspect for whom the same is true.

 

As for blacks and whites dating and getting married - most people have been cool with that for decades.  Why shouldn't they if they love each other?   Just because some people in this world are racists  - why should they be? 

 

And why shouldn't gays and lesbians celebrate when they find someone they love and make a long term commitment?  What would you have them do - live a life of misery and shame and guilt and go in hiding because certain other people disapprove of them?

 

What has always made America unique and special is the fact that it was founded on the premise that your life is yours to live as you see fit - and, so long as you are peaceful and do not initiate force or fraud against others, you are free to do so regardless as to how many disapprove.  What you are seeing is a byproduct of freedom.  And freedom includes the freedom to do things that you might not necessarily agree with or approve of.

 

As for tattoos, piercings, odd hairstyles, etc. - I can't say that I personally find such styles to be especially appealing aesthetically.  But why should those who wear them care what I think?  I have known a number of people over the years who fall into that category who, if you get to know them, are fun, intelligent and wonderful people.  If you look at and get to know people as individuals and not as members of particular groups or as practitioners of different lifestyles you will sometimes be amazed at how much you have in common with people you would never have suspected you would.  You know the old saying - don't judge a book by its cover.   If nothing else, show them the same level of respect that you would expect them to show towards you.

 

The fact that we live in a country where various subcultures flourish is a good thing.  The fact that we live in a country where a person can feel comfortable and open about being "different"  and outside of the "mainstream" is a good thing.   Observe that under a dictatorship among the very first things that are cracked down upon are politically incorrect subcultures (they divert people's attention away from the goals of Society and the State) and anybody else who fails to conform to the State's definition of "normal."


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#37 cberen1

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:33 AM

I feel that there is a change in Fort Worth's citizens from what was that of 20 years or so ago. In the better days you seldow saw piercied body parts and tattoos and fewer males with facial hair.  Most people would always wear a smile and speek to strangers like they would friends.  When you passed someone there was usually an exchange of kindly words and if you saw a piece of paper or trash on the ground you would pick it up.  Neighbors knew each other and often spoke and shared gosip.  Most people respected religion and would honor discussions and debates on politics.  It seemed people were more focused on the good and health of society in geneal.  Today people seem to want personal recognition and to be noticed by others by way of their dressing, hairdos, arm bracelets, jewelery, hats, bumper stickers, and facebook broadcasts.  Being retired, I don't get out as much as when working but this past week I had to go to the Apple store on University to get a cell phone speaker replaced and I was shocked by the Apple staff.  The wild hairdoos, and colors, piercing, and wearing shorts while on the job.  Friday I went through Central Market and the weirdos were wall to wall. 

Used to, people worked for a living and you wouldn't see the fruit cases until after hours or weekends but now they roam the city all day.  What do these people do for a living?  We used to never hear of black and whites dating (much less marrying) and if there were gays or lesbians around, you didnt talk about it but now it seems an "honor" or bragging point to be one and need for celebration if two of these decide to get married.

Is Fort Worth getting more "hip" or more "liberal"? 

 

I don't want to enter this particular debate (especially your points at the end) because I don't think that's the point of this forum, but I think the openess and friendlieness you see as diminishing is still there.  It just shows up a little differently now in the form of acceptance of different appearances and lifestyles.  It's hard to talk while you're texting.  I'm the most boring guy in the world.  Middle class, middle age, white, male, no tattoos, no piercings, I shop at the GAP, drive a suburban, have 2.3 kids and two dogs, etc.  Hell, today, like almost every other day I'm wearing khaki dress pants and a white button down dress shirt.  I'm as interesting as unsalted mashed potatoes.  And one of the things I've always loved about Fort Worth is that with few exceptions I can walk into any bar, club or restaurant dressed like I am right now and not feel out of place.  I don't get too worried about what kind of shoes I'm wearing, or if I've got enough gel in my hair, or who might see me.  I can just go out and be me and it's fine because Fort Worth doesn't care.  I also think it's great that the same would be true if I was a 22 year-old gay man who wore skinny jeans, a retro sex pistols t-shirt and crazy hair.

 

I don't think Fort Worth is changing.  I just think Fort Worth is open and friendly enough that the people who have always been there feel comfortable enough to be who they are without being judged for it.  Good for Fort Worth.

 

I also don't think today's fashions are really any weirder than bell bottoms, leg warmers, saggy jeans, tie dye, zipper jackets, giant shoulder pads, parachute pants, stone washed jeans, afros, perms, flock of seagulls hair, crimped hair, head bands, Willie Nelson hair, mohawks, pinky rings, bangles, twist beads, square ties, wide ties, three-piece suits, poodle skirts, bomber jackets, corduroy sports coats with elbow patches, dark eye shadow, too much rouge, giant hoop ear rings, suits with t-shirts, leather pants, members only jackets, rugby shirts, pink reebok hightops, keds, penny loafers, top-siders, plaid shorts, layered pastel polos, and on and on and on.  It's just fashion.  Even the crazy piercings, which I don't understand, but I don't care much either.  If the guy inside is ok, then it's ok with me.

 

I guess I did want to debate it.



#38 Doohickie

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:37 AM

In the better days....


The better days are right now.



EDIT: And on further rereads, do you have any idea how bigoted and closed-minded your post sounds?


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#39 JBB

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 08:56 AM

I wear shorts to work 10 months out of the year (praise the Lord for Texas weather). I wasn't aware that made me a weirdo or a "fruit case". I don't have any ink and my hair cut isn't wild, so I hope that cancels out the shorts.

#40 Fort Worthology

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:00 AM

I feel that there is a change in Fort Worth's citizens from what was that of 20 years or so ago. In the better days you seldow saw piercied body parts and tattoos and fewer males with facial hair.  Most people would always wear a smile and speek to strangers like they would friends.

 

"Better days?"

 

I talk to strangers as though they were friends, constantly.  People who often have tattoos and piercings and facial hair, some people whose lifestyles seem odd even to me - but they're all just people, and they're usually great.

 

  When you passed someone there was usually an exchange of kindly words and if you saw a piece of paper or trash on the ground you would pick it up.  Neighbors knew each other and often spoke and shared gosip.  Most people respected religion and would honor discussions and debates on politics.  It seemed people were more focused on the good and health of society in geneal.  Today people seem to want personal recognition and to be noticed by others by way of their dressing, hairdos, arm bracelets, jewelery, hats, bumper stickers, and facebook broadcasts.

 

Just the other day, I picked up a tree branch that had fallen into a bike lane.  There's a ton of folks in my neighborhood who dedicate themselves to bettering the neighborhood, the city, the world in general - just because they've probably got tattoos and piercings doesn't mean they're not doing good.

 

This weekend, my band's participating in a festival being put on by a guy with impressive facial hair who probably also has tattoos.  The point of the festival is to - wait for it - clean up Capps Park and get the community together for a good time and togetherness.  It still happens.  It's just in different forms sometimes.

 

  Being retired, I don't get out as much as when working but this past week I had to go to the Apple store on University to get a cell phone speaker replaced and I was shocked by the Apple staff.  The wild hairdoos, and colors, piercing, and wearing shorts while on the job.  Friday I went through Central Market and the weirdos were wall to wall. 

 

Honestly, the workers at the Apple Store - all of whom that I know are *very* hard-working as that is a very high-pressure, very popular retail environment - are pretty tame compared to some of the people who work at places I interact with on a day-to-day basis.  But I'll not hear anybody putting them down.  Whenever I'm waited on by a friend at Spiral Diner, I don't think "gee, what a weirdo, coming to work and letting people see her piercings and tattoos and crazy hair," I think "she's super nice and always gets the job done and is really cool."

 

Used to, people worked for a living and you wouldn't see the fruit cases until after hours or weekends but now they roam the city all day.  What do these people do for a living?

 

They work.  They go to school.  They raise families.  They date.  They create.  They do pretty much what everybody else does.

 

I bet my friends who run the bakery in the Southside would get a kick out of being called "fruit cases," what with their tattoos and such...they'd laugh, but they'd be doing it as they worked their butts off running their own business AND raising three kids (AWESOME kids, I might add).

 

We used to never hear of black and whites dating (much less marrying) and if there were gays or lesbians around, you didnt talk about it but now it seems an "honor" or bragging point to be one and need for celebration if two of these decide to get married.

 

Wow.  Not sure where to even begin here.  You are treading on some *very* out-of-touch ground here.  In my day-to-day life I have numerous friends who are in mixed-race relationships (or are the product of them), or who are gay or lesbian, and you know what?

 

Nobody.  Freakin'.  Cares.

 

They're all just PEOPLE.  The "honor" or "bragging" or "celebration" mainly comes about from the fact that they're *still* treated as second-class citizens when it comes to their relationship, so they're fighting for their freedom in that regard, not too dissimilar from how black people had to, or women had to...

 

In our day-to-day interaction, I don't give a flyin' flip about somebody's race or orientation.  But I *cannot wait* to celebrate, for example, my lesbian friend who drummed for us at SXSW's wedding one day, just as she and her partner celebrated my own wedding.

 

I didn't want to get into this, but man...just surprised to see this on the forum.


- Writer, musician, photographer, general nerd.

 


#41 McHand

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 10:28 PM

Is there any chance Papaw got hacked?  I just cannot believe that I read that in print. Digital print.  You know what I mean.


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#42 johnfwd

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 07:42 AM

I don’t begrudge Papaw for his opinions but they are not mine.  However, I understand that many old-timers in Fort Worth have a “cowboy” sentiment that is reactionary to the increasing cosmopolitan and multi-cultural environment that is transforming our city. It's inevitable and they'll just have to live with it.   Fort Worth, “where the West begins,” is kind of split between the entrenched conservative attitudes of small town west Texans and the “liberal” or maybe “hip” attitudes of the eastern U.S. migrants who have come to Texas and settled mainly in the big cities.  Let us also be mindful of the cultural influence that people from the Middle East and Asia, not just Mexico, are having in the Metroplex.



#43 cberen1

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 08:23 AM

People's attitudes about change in this area are funny.  I've got some family friends from West Texas that are about as conservative as you can imagine.  Very religious (Christian), white, small business owners, 4th generation Texans.  Growing up around them they would from tiem to time make comments that to them didn't seem bigoted, but in hindsight clearly demonstrated deeply held biases against gay people, black people, jews, hispanics and generally anybody that didn't look exactly like they did.  Funny enough, fast forward 25 years and they've got an aunt who married a black cowboy from Montana, a sister that married a Bahamian (read: skin as dark as night), a favorite cousin whose partner is such a good guy they couldn't figure out how to hate him, and another sister who is married to a paraplegic.  For a bunch of conservative Irish Catholics this is a lot to take in.  They've done better with it than I would have expected, but it took time.

 

I feel bad for people who are given no choice but to let go of things that shape their belief system.  You can see how terribly frustrating it is for them, almost painful.  Nothing is so challenging as being forced to deal with your fears and prejudices head on. Accepting that you're wrong can be hard.  Some people will never get there.  This kind of change appears to me to often take place generationally.  My attitudes about homosexuality, race, religion, etc. are very different from my father's views.  And as much as I want to believe that I have an enlightened perspective, I know that there are prejudices inside me that I simply do not see or maybe choose not to deal with.  I hope my children are a step better at this than I am.



#44 Dismuke

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 09:05 AM

 However, I understand that many old-timers in Fort Worth have a “cowboy” sentiment that is reactionary to the increasing cosmopolitan and multi-cultural environment that is transforming our city....

 

I think what you are talking about goes beyond a mere "cowboy" sentiment.  I would submit that, to one degree or another, it is part of the normal process of growing older in an industrialized society where, within the span of a natural lifetime, there is ongoing and profound change on all fronts.

 

People tend to keep up with technological changes as they come along.  But once people reach middle age, they tend to not pay as much attention to the pop culture.  For one, they grow out of certain aspects of it that they found appealing when they were younger.  Plus they become busy with other things - job, family, house, hobbies, etc.

 

I once had the pleasure of spending an afternoon with a gentleman in his late 90s.  His mind was sharp as can be - he remembered names and places from 80 years ago better than I sometimes recall things from 10 years ago.   He told me about his adventures as a child in the 1910s and all of the many famous people he had a chance to meet in the 1920s and 1930s.   One of the questions I asked him was what he thought of the world today.  His answer, to paraphrase as best I can remember, was that, while there are many nice things today that simply weren't available back then, today's world, to him, often makes him feel like he is living "in a foreign country."

 

I suspect that many people reading this today will have a similar feeling when they hopefully get to be a ripe old age.   That doesn't mean that one has to negatively prejudge younger generations.  But it is very likely that one will not be able to relate to them in certain areas.   And this is nothing new.   There were people who came of age in the Victorian era who lived to see all that happened in the 1960s and 1970s.   My great grandmother was one of them.  She was born before the invention of the light bulb and lived to see man on the moon and died well into Nixon's second term a few days shy of her 103 birthday. 

 

And with regard to the immigrant population - oddly enough, I can even relate to how disconcerting that might be.  I say "oddly enough" because the immigrant populations here are one of the things that I particularly enjoy about living in a big metropolitan area.  What I love about Arlington is all of the ethnic neighborhoods and markets that have take up in mid-century era neighborhoods.   There are lots of great oriental markets of various sorts - and one of my favorite stores is a Halal market that has food from the Balkan countries, the Mideast and pretty much any country that has a large Muslim population.  Shopping there is an adventure - and about the only place I have been to where one can check out local mineral waters from various countries of the former Yugoslavia.   What I love about Irving is the Indian community that has really blossomed in recent years.  When I worked in Irving, I did most of my grocery shopping at a large Indian supermarket.  I am a fanatic for Indian food and the supermarket often had incredible bargains on nice quality produce.   On my "wish list" for Fort Worth is for a whole bunch of Indians to move to the city so that it can support a similar supermarket that I don't have to drive as far to patronize.

 

On the other hand, there have been occasions when I have been driving around the eastern Dallas suburbs and drove through neighborhoods that I remember from childhood and have not visited since.   These are mid-century era neighborhoods that, when I was a child, were still very much stereotypical, mainstream middle class America.  I never gave much thought to such neighborhood when I was a kid - indeed, I considered them to be rather boring.   But going back years later and seeing all the same buildings but now sporting signs that are in an entirely different language - there is a certain shock to it.   Certainly I don't have anything against the people now living there - indeed, if it were in Arlington or some other place where I did not remember how things were before, I would think the neighborhood is incredibly cool.   But there is a certain strange feeling when you realize that something familiar, something that you took for granted and never gave much thought to is suddenly gone forever.   And sometimes such things occur without your really realizing it - until one day you wake up and do realize it and are somewhat shocked by it.

 

My best advice to older people is to focus not so much on the culture of today's world but things such as technology and the incredible options we have today that were not available in the past.   We didn't have places like Central Market 25 years ago.   We certainly didn't have all of the wonderful gadgets that one can find at the Apple Store.  I don't consider myself "old" - but as someone who is fascinated by and immerses himself in the early 20th century decades I can relate to how old people feel.   My attitude is that I have the luxury of being able to pick and choose the best from all eras.  I enjoy technology - and I use it to watch vintage movies, look at vintage photos and to find and enjoy vintage music.  Adopt a "live and let live" attitude towards those who have different tastes, interests and lifestyles and, instead, spend your energies on finding people who share yours.  And when circumstances force you to interact with people who are very different from yourself look at them as individuals and seek things that you DO have in common and steer the conversation away from one's differences.  You will be pleasantly surprised at how many people who you might think look like freaks end up being anything but. 


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#45 ramjet

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 11:45 AM

 However, I understand that many old-timers in Fort Worth have a “cowboy” sentiment that is reactionary to the increasing cosmopolitan and multi-cultural environment that is transforming our city....

 

I think what you are talking about goes beyond a mere "cowboy" sentiment.  I would submit that, to one degree or another, it is part of the normal process of growing older in an industrialized society where, within the span of a natural lifetime, there is ongoing and profound change on all fronts.

 

People tend to keep up with technological changes as they come along.  But once people reach middle age, they tend to not pay as much attention to the pop culture.  For one, they grow out of certain aspects of it that they found appealing when they were younger.  Plus they become busy with other things - job, family, house, hobbies, etc.

 

I once had the pleasure of spending an afternoon with a gentleman in his late 90s.  His mind was sharp as can be - he remembered names and places from 80 years ago better than I sometimes recall things from 10 years ago.   He told me about his adventures as a child in the 1910s and all of the many famous people he had a chance to meet in the 1920s and 1930s.   One of the questions I asked him was what he thought of the world today.  His answer, to paraphrase as best I can remember, was that, while there are many nice things today that simply weren't available back then, today's world, to him, often makes him feel like he is living "in a foreign country."

 

I suspect that many people reading this today will have a similar feeling when they hopefully get to be a ripe old age.   That doesn't mean that one has to negatively prejudge younger generations.  But it is very likely that one will not be able to relate to them in certain areas.   And this is nothing new.   There were people who came of age in the Victorian era who lived to see all that happened in the 1960s and 1970s.   My great grandmother was one of them.  She was born before the invention of the light bulb and lived to see man on the moon and died well into Nixon's second term a few days shy of her 103 birthday. 

 

And with regard to the immigrant population - oddly enough, I can even relate to how disconcerting that might be.  I say "oddly enough" because the immigrant populations here are one of the things that I particularly enjoy about living in a big metropolitan area.  What I love about Arlington is all of the ethnic neighborhoods and markets that have take up in mid-century era neighborhoods.   There are lots of great oriental markets of various sorts - and one of my favorite stores is a Halal market that has food from the Balkan countries, the Mideast and pretty much any country that has a large Muslim population.  Shopping there is an adventure - and about the only place I have been to where one can check out local mineral waters from various countries of the former Yugoslavia.   What I love about Irving is the Indian community that has really blossomed in recent years.  When I worked in Irving, I did most of my grocery shopping at a large Indian supermarket.  I am a fanatic for Indian food and the supermarket often had incredible bargains on nice quality produce.   On my "wish list" for Fort Worth is for a whole bunch of Indians to move to the city so that it can support a similar supermarket that I don't have to drive as far to patronize.

 

On the other hand, there have been occasions when I have been driving around the eastern Dallas suburbs and drove through neighborhoods that I remember from childhood and have not visited since.   These are mid-century era neighborhoods that, when I was a child, were still very much stereotypical, mainstream middle class America.  I never gave much thought to such neighborhood when I was a kid - indeed, I considered them to be rather boring.   But going back years later and seeing all the same buildings but now sporting signs that are in an entirely different language - there is a certain shock to it.   Certainly I don't have anything against the people now living there - indeed, if it were in Arlington or some other place where I did not remember how things were before, I would think the neighborhood is incredibly cool.   But there is a certain strange feeling when you realize that something familiar, something that you took for granted and never gave much thought to is suddenly gone forever.   And sometimes such things occur without your really realizing it - until one day you wake up and do realize it and are somewhat shocked by it.

 

My best advice to older people is to focus not so much on the culture of today's world but things such as technology and the incredible options we have today that were not available in the past.   We didn't have places like Central Market 25 years ago.   We certainly didn't have all of the wonderful gadgets that one can find at the Apple Store.  I don't consider myself "old" - but as someone who is fascinated by and immerses himself in the early 20th century decades I can relate to how old people feel.   My attitude is that I have the luxury of being able to pick and choose the best from all eras.  I enjoy technology - and I use it to watch vintage movies, look at vintage photos and to find and enjoy vintage music.  Adopt a "live and let live" attitude towards those who have different tastes, interests and lifestyles and, instead, spend your energies on finding people who share yours.  And when circumstances force you to interact with people who are very different from yourself look at them as individuals and seek things that you DO have in common and steer the conversation away from one's differences.  You will be pleasantly surprised at how many people who you might think look like freaks end up being anything but. 

 

Dismuke:  this is seriously good writing, on top of seriously spot-on insight and good advice.  Like, "Anna Quindlen in The New York Times" good. You ought to send this to the Star-Telegram or the FW Weekly as a citizen essay of observations on a changing city.



#46 eastfwther

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 12:31 PM

 

 

   What I love about Irving is the Indian community that has really blossomed in recent years.  When I worked in Irving, I did most of my grocery shopping at a large Indian supermarket.  I am a fanatic for Indian food and the supermarket often had incredible bargains on nice quality produce.   On my "wish list" for Fort Worth is for a whole bunch of Indians to move to the city so that it can support a similar supermarket that I don't have to drive as far to patronize

I work in Las Colinas and had no idea of the huge Indian population in Las Colinas/Irving and North Dallas until I started working there. I'm sure it's because of all the high tech jobs. I've learned the Indian population goes from Las Colinas (Irving), North Dallas, and Richardson.  There's a huge Middle Eastern population around the Galleria area of Dallas as well.  I had no idea this area to the north was so diverse.  Fort Worth definitely could use a touch of it. 



#47 Dismuke

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 09:28 PM

Dismuke:  this is seriously good writing,

 

Gee, ramjet - thank you for the very nice comment. 


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#48 Doohickie

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 06:46 AM

On my "wish list" for Fort Worth is for a whole bunch of Indians to move to the city so that it can support a similar supermarket that I don't have to drive as far to patronize.

 

Not sure if they're big enough for ya, but there are a couple of Indian markets in Wedgewood near the Harbor Freight.


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#49 RD Milhollin

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 05:30 AM

This blogger goes beyond "Not Hip Enough" and ranks Fort Worth and Arlington among top Redneck Cities:

 

http://www.fwweekly....redneck-cities/



#50 DrkLts

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 11:20 AM

Well being home to NASCAR and FW STOCKYARDS, kinda creates a bubba image. LOL just sayin'  :P






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