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Vertical garden - sprucing up drab AT&T building ?


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#1 BlueMound

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 02:16 PM

I wonder if a vertical garden could spruce up the drab AT&T building in downtown ?
I'm not sure how practical these vertical garden are.
How expensive they are to maintain or if Texas weather would destroy one.
But they are pretty cool.

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#2 FWJD

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 06:20 PM

I think the Texas heat would make a vertical garden next to impossible to establish. I 'm
no structural engineer, but I wonder how such a garden would affect the infrastructure/stability of the building over time. I know some residential architects frown upon foliage on homes for that very reason.

#3 RD Milhollin

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:45 PM

I think the Texas heat would make a vertical garden next to impossible to establish. I 'm
no structural engineer, but I wonder how such a garden would affect the infrastructure/stability of the building over time. I know some residential architects frown upon foliage on homes for that very reason.


I would guess that the exterior of the building would have to be suited to supporting this sort of foliage. The average residential structure in Texas would be taken apart in a few years by plants allowed to grow over it. The buildings pictured are in Paris, are commercial structures, and are probably subject to much more stringent standards than the average Texas tilt wall. I would have to look more closely but the external finish may be specially designed to accommodate this sort of plant life. In addition, the climate of Paris is much more suited to luxurious plant life than here:

Fort Worth Climate

Paris Climate

Absolutely agreed that something should be done to at least make the street-level view of the ATT Building more suitable to the location across the street from the Convention Center. Small retail, restaurants, a bar, all would seem to be appropriate if allowed to lease space around the building, and I seriously doubt if it would affect the operation of the upstairs switches in the least. I would also guess that The owner has no incentive to make the building more attractive or more useful for anything other than the use they have for it. Perhaps the FW Chamber and Convention Bureau could sit down to an expensive lunch with a minor VP for ATT and suggest that such improvements would count toward their community support "obligation". The conventional way to do this would be to offer tax rebates...

As far was in-city gardens, roof top sanctuaries with potted trees and bushes would probably work well on top of hotels and residential mixed-use buildings. When I was last in NYC and up on the "Top of the Rock" public observation deck at 30 Rockefeller Plaza I was amazed at the number of buildings with green roofs. As most of the roofs in Fort Worth are low and flat this would seem a good use of otherwise wasted space.

#4 Doohickie

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 11:33 AM

I think the Texas heat would make a vertical garden next to impossible to establish.

If they can use lantana, they will have no problems. That stuff is hardy.
My blog: Doohickie

#5 renamerusk

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 10:09 AM

lnChwrm.jpg

 

[As close as I could come to a relative topic]

 

Draw your attention to the roof top of the Tower Garage that is located immediately across 5th Street from JOT.

 

Is this not an ideal opportunity to create a roof top cactus/rock garden? I am thinking something like the B.R.I.T roof top.



#6 RD Milhollin

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 10:54 AM

Is this not an ideal opportunity to create a roof top cactus/rock garden? I am thinking something like the B.R.I.T roof top.

 

 

Add a little gravel and a guy with a rake and a "Zen Garden" could be easily done. A BRIT-type roof would be a little more difficult. I wonder what the folks at BRIT would say about doing that? What about urban vegetable farming? It may be a little too exposed to high winds and expected/usual storm damage. How about solar panels? Why are there not residences on the roof of parking garages with exposed top decks? I agree that roofs of buildings in our urban tradition, and not just downtown, are being underutilized...



#7 Austin55

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 02:07 PM

I remember Pittsburgh having a pretty large "garden wall", I think its the largest in the country, here's someone else's picture,

 

pittsburgh-one-pnc-plaza-green-wall-by-g



#8 BlueMound

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 06:34 PM

Spa in Vietnam immersed in draping plants, hanging gardens and green walls
http://www.designboo...nam-07-23-2015/

#9 BlueMound

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 09:17 PM

Patrick Blanc's website
Blanc is one of the pioneering designers of the vertical garden
http://www.verticalg...atrickblanc.com




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