Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Random Trivia and Historical Facts


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 12 February 2010 - 03:38 PM

I want to hear some random history that is little known or unknown. Post them up.
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#2 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 13 February 2010 - 06:26 PM

The first election in Tarrant County was held at Traders Oaks Park in Rock Island. Their is a landmark under a tree that states so. Very neat. go check it out.
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#3 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 13 February 2010 - 06:30 PM

A monument of William Jenkins Worth is located in New York City. The monument is known as Worth Square and is located in Manhattan.
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#4 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 14 February 2010 - 11:10 PM

It's not only a monument to William Jenkins Worth, but it is also his grave. The ironic thing is that he is buried across from New York's Flatiron Building, and Fort Worth also has a Flatiron Building, modeled after the one in New York.

#5 GenE

GenE

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:History, photography,

Posted 15 February 2010 - 08:51 AM

QUOTE (FortWorthLowrider @ Feb 13 2010, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first election in Tarrant County was held at Traders Oaks Park in Rock Island. Their is a landmark under a tree that states so. Very neat. go check it out.



I am in Austin, and looking on Mapquest. Can you please give me an address for either Traders Oaks Park or Rock Island?

#6 John S.

John S.

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 563 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Samuels Avenue FW

Posted 15 February 2010 - 11:07 AM

QUOTE (GenE @ Feb 15 2010, 08:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (FortWorthLowrider @ Feb 13 2010, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first election in Tarrant County was held at Traders Oaks Park in Rock Island. Their is a landmark under a tree that states so. Very neat. go check it out.



I am in Austin, and looking on Mapquest. Can you please give me an address for either Traders Oaks Park or Rock Island?



I live on Samuels Avenue. (where Traders Oak Park is located) You should be able to see it in Google Streetview (be sure to choose full screen mode) in the 1400 block of Samuels on the east side of the street. Hope this is helpful.

#7 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 15 February 2010 - 11:39 AM

QUOTE (GenE @ Feb 15 2010, 08:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am in Austin, and looking on Mapquest. Can you please give me an address for either Traders Oaks Park or Rock Island?

Samuel Ave.
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#8 John S.

John S.

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 563 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Samuels Avenue FW

Posted 15 February 2010 - 12:08 PM

QUOTE (FortWorthLowrider @ Feb 13 2010, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first election in Tarrant County was held at Traders Oaks Park in Rock Island. Their is a landmark under a tree that states so. Very neat. go check it out.



Want some more Traders Oak park trivia? According to Julia Kathryn Garrett in her 1972 book, Fort Worth: A Frontier Triumph, Archibald Leonard and Henry Daggett set up the very first business in Fort Worth at Traders Oak soon after the Fort was established to sell supplies to the soldiers stationed here. Also little known today is that a much over-grown spring (called in old newspaper accounts, Terry Springs, after Col. Nathaniel Terry who arrived in 1854 and lived nearby) is located on the northern end of the park. According to Garrett, the Spring was the site of early public gatherings including a barbecue in the early 1860's where two lawyers, A.Y. Fowler and Hiram Calloway, got into a scuffle with Calloway pushing Fowler over the low cliff on the edge of the spring, causing him to break his arm. (the low cliff is still visible) A few days later, the two men met west of the courthouse and shot each other dead. The old spring was used as a neighborhood garbage dump for many years and is heavily overgrown and mostly dry today. (except where the railroad track bed has cut through the nearby hillside) Some local history bluffs suggest Major Ripley Arnold (who established the Fort) may have initially camped out for 3 months after June 1849 near the spring before moving to higher ground near the present courthouse because of mosquitoes and the need for a better vantage point.

The original land owner of Traders Oak was Felix Mulliken who arrived here in the 1840's with his family as part of the Peters Colony settlers from Kentucky and settled in the Grapevine area. Mulliken and his wife were among the 12 founding members of the Lonesome Dove Baptist Church, still in existence. According to deed records, his one square mile headright certificate to the park and part of Samuels Avenue (south of Pioneers Rest cemetery) was patented in Austin in the early 1850s. He died about the same time and his widow supposedly sold the land. However, his sons legally contested the sale periodically until the 1890's as being fraudulent. Courts declared by that time that the statute of limitations had expired and they got nothing. Samuels Avenue was a posh neighborhood by the 1890's and the land quite valuable.

Enough trivia yet? Traders Oak Park is steeped in early Fort Worth history but much of it is obscure today. About 10 years ago I was walking around the east end of the Park and found a small flint arrowhead in a washed out area. It was later identified as a bird point. So it appears the Park area and spring were active even before Fort Worth was established. Some unproven accounts additionally claim that Samuels Avenue was a Native American trail before the Fort was established, but regardless, it is Fort Worth's oldest street and Traders Oak Park was a very important part of it.

#9 Nitixope

Nitixope

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts
  • Location:Fort Worth, TX

Posted 15 February 2010 - 12:45 PM

Dove Road Just East of Hwy 114:


Marker Text:
We the people of the State of Texas acknowledge and thank troopers Edward Bryan Wheeler and H.D. Murphy for the great sacrifice they made to keep the public safe.
Troopers Wheeler and Murphy were shot to death Easter Sunday April 1, 1934 near this site on West Dove Road, by infamous criminals, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Wheeler and Murphy stopped their motorcycles near Parker and Barrow's car, thinking a motorist needed assistance. When they approached they were shot.
Their efforts will stand the test of time.
May God bless their souls.
(Erected 1996)


#10 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 15 February 2010 - 02:08 PM

QUOTE (John S. @ Feb 15 2010, 12:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Want some more Traders Oak park trivia? According to Julia Kathryn Garrett in her 1972 book, Fort Worth: A Frontier Triumph, Archibald Leonard and Henry Daggett set up the very first business in Fort Worth at Traders Oak soon after the Fort was established to sell supplies to the soldiers stationed here. Also little known today is that a much over-grown spring (called in old newspaper accounts, Terry Springs, after Col. Nathaniel Terry who arrived in 1854 and lived nearby) is located on the northern end of the park. According to Garrett, the Spring was the site of early public gatherings including a barbecue in the early 1860's where two lawyers, A.Y. Fowler and Hiram Calloway, got into a scuffle with Calloway pushing Fowler over the low cliff on the edge of the spring, causing him to break his arm. (the low cliff is still visible) A few days later, the two men met west of the courthouse and shot each other dead. The old spring was used as a neighborhood garbage dump for many years and is heavily overgrown and mostly dry today. (except where the railroad track bed has cut through the nearby hillside) Some local history bluffs suggest Major Ripley Arnold (who established the Fort) may have initially camped out for 3 months after June 1849 near the spring before moving to higher ground near the present courthouse because of mosquitoes and the need for a better vantage point.

The original land owner of Traders Oak was Felix Mulliken who arrived here in the 1840's with his family as part of the Peters Colony settlers from Kentucky and settled in the Grapevine area. Mulliken and his wife were among the 12 founding members of the Lonesome Dove Baptist Church, still in existence. According to deed records, his one square mile headright certificate to the park and part of Samuels Avenue (south of Pioneers Rest cemetery) was patented in Austin in the early 1850s. He died about the same time and his widow supposedly sold the land. However, his sons legally contested the sale periodically until the 1890's as being fraudulent. Courts declared by that time that the statute of limitations had expired and they got nothing. Samuels Avenue was a posh neighborhood by the 1890's and the land quite valuable.

Enough trivia yet? Traders Oak Park is steeped in early Fort Worth history but much of it is obscure today. About 10 years ago I was walking around the east end of the Park and found a small flint arrowhead in a washed out area. It was later identified as a bird point. So it appears the Park area and spring were active even before Fort Worth was established. Some unproven accounts additionally claim that Samuels Avenue was a Native American trail before the Fort was established, but regardless, it is Fort Worth's oldest street and Traders Oak Park was a very important part of it.

Very nice read. smile.gif
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#11 GenE

GenE

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:History, photography,

Posted 15 February 2010 - 02:54 PM

QUOTE (John S. @ Feb 15 2010, 11:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (GenE @ Feb 15 2010, 08:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (FortWorthLowrider @ Feb 13 2010, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first election in Tarrant County was held at Traders Oaks Park in Rock Island. Their is a landmark under a tree that states so. Very neat. go check it out.



I am in Austin, and looking on Mapquest. Can you please give me an address for either Traders Oaks Park or Rock Island?



I live on Samuels Avenue. (where Traders Oak Park is located) You should be able to see it in Google Streetview (be sure to choose full screen mode) in the 1400 block of Samuels on the east side of the street. Hope this is helpful.



Thanks for the information. I also read the blurb about the park, the spring, and the killing of the troopers by Bonnie & Clyde.

However, I don't see anything that tells where the "Rock Island" comes from, and I didn't see any streets by that name. Did it have something to do with the railroad?

#12 AndyN

AndyN

    Skyscraper Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midland, Tx. for now

Posted 15 February 2010 - 03:06 PM


Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#13 GenE

GenE

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:History, photography,

Posted 15 February 2010 - 03:10 PM

QUOTE (John S. @ Feb 15 2010, 11:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (GenE @ Feb 15 2010, 08:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (FortWorthLowrider @ Feb 13 2010, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first election in Tarrant County was held at Traders Oaks Park in Rock Island. Their is a landmark under a tree that states so. Very neat. go check it out.



I am in Austin, and looking on Mapquest. Can you please give me an address for either Traders Oaks Park or Rock Island?



I live on Samuels Avenue. (where Traders Oak Park is located) You should be able to see it in Google Streetview (be sure to choose full screen mode) in the 1400 block of Samuels on the east side of the street. Hope this is helpful.



Thanks for the information. I also read the blurb about the park, the spring, and the killing of the troopers by Bonnie & Clyde.

However, I don't see anything that tells where the "Rock Island" comes from, and I didn't see any streets by that name. Did it have something to do with the railroad?

Nevermind, I googled and found the answer in the Handbook of Texas Online.



#14 djold1

djold1

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 689 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76179

Posted 15 February 2010 - 03:55 PM

I'm a little confused about the Rock Island reference in the Trader Oaks tale. The Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf (Now the Union Pacific) did not enter Fort Worth until after 1900 where they eventually built some sizeable shops & a round house just north of Pharr Street and south of Cold Springs Road. I understand that the Rock Island neighborhood was and still may be in that general area west of the railroads.

I don't beleive the the neighborhhood woiuld have gone as far north as the east side of Trader Oaks and in any case there certainly was no Rock Island neighborhood when that election was held. Am I missing something?

Pete Charlton
The Fort Worth Gazette blog
The Lost Antique Maps of Fort Worth on CDROM
Website: Antique Maps of Texas
Large format reproductions of original antique and vintage Texas & southwestern maps
 


#15 AndyN

AndyN

    Skyscraper Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midland, Tx. for now

Posted 15 February 2010 - 04:17 PM

Samuels/Rock Island is the official neighborhood designation. There is no relationship between the CRI&P and the early days of Fort Worth, it's just that the trader oak tree is located in the S/RI neighborhood.
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#16 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 16 February 2010 - 12:55 AM

QUOTE (AndyN @ Feb 15 2010, 04:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Samuels/Rock Island is the official neighborhood designation. There is no relationship between the CRI&P and the early days of Fort Worth, it's just that the trader oak tree is located in the S/RI neighborhood.

on the nose.
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#17 817.TX.

817.TX.

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 67 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:FORT WORTH TEXAS
  • Interests:Chevrolet Impalas Schwinns

Posted 10 March 2010 - 01:03 PM

smile.gif Keep it coming very interesting!
Born and Raised in Ft. Worth Texas.

Best believe I aint going no where!!

#18 YMCAhistory

YMCAhistory

    Newcomer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 11 March 2010 - 02:09 PM

QUOTE (FortWorthLowrider @ Feb 12 2010, 03:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I want to hear some random history that is little known or unknown. Post them up.


Did you know...that the YMCA was started in Fort Worth 120 years ago on March 1, 1890? It started as an evangelical outreach and utlized a Gospel Wagon pulled by horses. There were many firsts began by the YMCA in Fort Worth...including starting the first Boy Scout troop and some of the first organized sports. For more info and historical photos, visit YMCA 120th History Blog

#19 FortWorthLowrider

FortWorthLowrider

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Fort Worth
  • Interests:The city of FORT WORTH

    LOWRIDERS

    TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB

Posted 11 March 2010 - 10:14 PM

That is awesome. Good info right there.
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#20 Giraffe

Giraffe

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 181 posts

Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:15 PM

The world's first Washateria was opened in 1936 in Fort Worth. It was set up by a gent named Noah Brannen. I don't know the precise location of it. I also don't know if all the washers/dryers there were coin-operated, or if you needed help from a human employee.

As a kid I remember seeing a TV commercial for a Fort Worth bank that featured this little item. The slogan for the bank at this time (late '70s, early '80s) was "The First is the best," so I guess it was for the First National Bank.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users