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#51 David Love

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 06:47 PM

Most recent Fort Worth Reserve Police Officer graduation.




Better Business Bureau:  A place to find or post valid complaints for auto delerships and maintenance facilities. (New Features) If you have a valid gripe about auto dealerships, this is the place to voice it.


#52 Herb Jones

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 07:56 PM

QUOTE (EwingFTW @ May 6 2009, 03:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Papaw @ May 6 2009, 12:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hinzdl - thanks, that must have been him, he did mention he had brothers in on the force. We have been honored to have had - and still have - some great officers representing our city.

Welcome to the Forum!



Here are a couple of pictures from the archives of the Fort Worth Police Historical Association.



This appears to be Officer Wood and his son on the left preparing a float for a downtown parade. Note T&P Station in the rear. Don't have the identity of the other officer at this time.





Sgt. Wood at the Harley Shop 1401 (?). Lawrence Wood joined the FWPD in 1942 and retired in 1978 as Captain Wood, head of the Traffic Division. Drop by the Fire and Police Training Center, 1000 Calvert. His two motorcycles are near the entrance. A lot of other great history items are displayed along the hallways.

Capt. Wood had two older brothers on the Police Department, Thomas Wood, 1936-1963 and J. E. Wood who resigned in 1963 to teach at Northwestern.

Yep...That's Woody, The friend of every youngster that cruised University Dr and hung out at Carlson's Drive-in During the 60's.






Herb Jones

#53 Papaw

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 08:48 PM

Boy, what I wouldn't give to trade the problems we face today for the ones we faced then. Damn, I must be getting old, I sound just like my Father and Grandfather!

#54 Cowtown Mike

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 10:26 PM

Papaw,

I am with you on that. I am sure the problems looked big in those days, but how things have chagned. This reminded me of "Cool Hand Luke"
went to prison for cutting of the heads of parking meters.

#55 hinzdl

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 08:40 AM

Fort Worth Police Historical Association 2010 Open-House


Admission is FREE and open to everyone


It could be said that women in the United States have been searching for equality since the birth of this Nation. In 1776, Abagail Adams wrote her husband John, who was working with others to write the Declaration of Independence, “Remember the ladies.” Evidently her request fell on deaf ears, the Declaration was worded, “…all men are created equal.”

Prior to and during the 19th century women were considered “2nd class citizens” whose existence was limited to being "barefoot, pregnant and in the kitchen.” Women were looked on as sub-sets of their husband. Both before and after marriage they didn’t have the right to own property, maintain their wages or sign contracts, much less vote.

The year before Fort Worth was chartered by the State legislators in 1873, Susan B. Anthony was arrested and brought to trial in Rochester, NY for attempting to vote for Ulysses S. Grant in the presidential election. It would be another thirty-four years before women would gain a “toe hold” in the Fort Worth Police Department when Emma Richardson was hired as a police matron. Decades more went by before women were placed into all areas of the Department from clerical positions to street enforcement.

On April 10th of this year, the Fort Worth Police Historical Association will host its 4th Annual open House, “Women in Law Enforcement”, featuring the women of the Fort Worth Police Department. The doors of the Police Training Center at 1000 Calvert will be open, from 10am-4pm, so you can meet and talk with many of these women who in some ways, had to battle their way into the positions they held. For a short six hours we will honor all women of the Fort Worth Police Department, not only those that have worn the badge but also those in support roles, who have kept them safe and helped the Department fulfill its mission.

Bring the family; there will be plenty to do for the kids. Help us say thanks to these women for their dedication.

Hope to see you there.......


#56 EwingFTW

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 01:28 PM

QUOTE (hinzdl @ Feb 1 2010, 08:40 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Fort Worth Police Historical Association 2010 Open-House

Admission is FREE and open to everyone

On April 10, 2010, the Fort Worth Police Historical Association will host its 4th Annual Open House, “Women in Law Enforcement”, featuring the women of the Fort Worth Police Department. The doors of the Police Training Center at 1000 Calvert will be open, from 10am-4pm, so you can meet and talk with many of these women who in some ways, had to battle their way into the positions they held. For a short six hours we will honor all women of the Fort Worth Police Department, not only those that have worn the badge but also those in support roles, who have kept them safe and helped the Department fulfill its mission.

Bring the family; there will be plenty to do for the kids. Help us say thanks to these women for their dedication.





#57 lonnzer

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 04:18 PM

QUOTE (Papaw @ May 6 2009, 09:11 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Woody was a FWPD Sargent that was assigned to Carlson's DriveInn and Root Beer Stand on University Dr. in the late 50's and early 60's while I was attending Paschal High School. This might have been an "extra" job as far as I know but he was there nearly every evening - especially on weekends. He drove his police Harley and was there to keep peace and quit amongst the teens which continually drove around and through the drive in with their loud pipes and blazing radios. What was different about Woody, he was one of the kindest person you would ever meet and was the kids best friend. He associated with the teens like he was one of them and he actually won their respect by him respecting them. If he caught you drinking he would pour out your stash and if you had too much he would always see to it someone got you home - but your car stayed there till the next day! He cut up and joked with the kids just like he was one of them. I knew several that had been into some trouble and Woody would spend a lot of time with these kids showing how to change their ways before it was too late, and he was nearly always successful.
Cajunmike - I'm think it might have been Lawrence but not real sure. I was wondering the same thing after reading a very interesting article on JFK's assasination involving Lawrence Wood.
I hope EwingFTW will read the the following article and give us any idea how much is factual or if he could add to it.

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/cowtown.txt

The article is "The Cowtown Connection" by Duke Lane and tells about the coincidence of some odd Fort Worth Police activity at the same time of JFK"s assasination that involved FWPD officers LE Wood, HW Sinclair and others. It was very interesting to me and I doubt if many locals have ever read it.




Captain Wood also escorted many funeral processions. I met him when I was a funeral director in Ft. Worth before moving to Austin. He escorted my grandfather's procession. My family thought that was a big honor by Captain Wood. He was a well respected gentleman and police officer.

#58 hinzdl

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 07:13 AM

The Lawrence Wood you are talking about are the same as the one in the article. He also had two brothers on the Department, J.E and T.M. Both of them resigned taking other jobs but Lawrence retired from the Department. He rode his motor until the day of his death. He did motor escorts at funerals and the morning of his death, he was doing an escort, he went out kicked over his motor (no electric starter for him) and decided he did not feel well. He shut it off went back into the house and sat down. That's were he passed....His son Larry is still alive and live in Fort Worth. Larry is the kid on the motor with Lawrence in one of the above photos.

He retired at the rank of Captain and was commander of the Traffic Division for several years. He would never give up his side-shift Harley. After his death thefamily donated his motor to the Department and it is now house at the Police Training Center. They also donated his shriner cycle, a miniture of his regular Harley which is also on dispaly at Training. Come on down and see it on the 10th of April from 10AM-4PM when we have the Police Historical Association's Open-House.....Dale

#59 EwingFTW

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:10 AM

QUOTE (EwingFTW @ Feb 8 2010, 02:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (hinzdl @ Feb 1 2010, 08:40 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Fort Worth Police Historical Association 2010 Open-House

Admission is FREE and open to everyone

On April 10, 2010, the Fort Worth Police Historical Association will host its 4th Annual Open House, “Women in Law Enforcement”, featuring the women of the Fort Worth Police Department. The doors of the Police Training Center at 1000 Calvert will be open, from 10am-4pm, so you can meet and talk with many of these women who in some ways, had to battle their way into the positions they held. For a short six hours we will honor all women of the Fort Worth Police Department, not only those that have worn the badge but also those in support roles, who have kept them safe and helped the Department fulfill its mission.

Bring the family; there will be plenty to do for the kids. Help us say thanks to these women for their dedication.







Just a reminder from a previous post. This Saturday, April 10, the Fort Worth Police Historical Association will have its Annual Open House.

You'll get to meet women in law enforcement, past and present, see helicopters, motorcycles, police cars, (old and new), an old jail wagon, mounted patrol officers, K-9 officers and their partners, etc., etc.

Bring the kids, they'll love it and they can even have their picture taken.





#60 EwingFTW

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 09:41 PM

Here is a 1938 picture of a Fort Worth Police car and two officers.
Note the front fenders with the police badges, the lack of red lights or siren
and also the officer's badge worn on the belt.







Can you help identify the location where this picture was taken?
Seems to me, I've seen this store front on South Main or Magnolia.



#61 Cowtown Mike

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 01:10 AM

Anyway to make the photo larger for viewing?

#62 hinzdl

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 06:31 AM

Jim, just to let you know, the officer on the left is Captain J.B. Derden and the one on the right is Wade Langley. I'm still working on the location. Also if you look closely you'll notice they are wearinig cross draw flap holsters.

#63 hinzdl

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 06:53 AM

I haven't posted anything for a while but found this and thought you might enjoy it. Also if you'd like to read our Historical Newsletter go to www.fortworthpd.com and in the center of the page is a badge, below is the information on the current badge and when that page is opened a link to the Police Historical Associations website is on the left. I hope that all that are interested in FWPD history will look at it and join the Association. Have a great day.....


Always a Cop:

Once the badge goes on, it never comes off, whether they can see it, or not. It fuses to the soul through adversity, fear and adrenaline and no one who has ever worn it with pride, integrity and guts, can ever sleep through the 'call of the wild' that wafts through bedroom windows in the deep of the night.

When Cops Retire

When a good cop leaves the 'job' and retires to a better life, many are jealous, some are pleased and yet others, who may have already retired, wonder. We wonder if he knows what he is leaving behind, because we already know. We know, for example, that after a lifetime of camaraderie that few experience, it will remain as a longing for those past times. We know in the law enforcement life there is a fellowship which lasts long after the uniforms are hung up in the back of the closet. We know even if he throws them away, they will be on him with every step and breath that remains in his life. We also know how the very bearing of the man speaks of what he was and in his heart still is.

These are the burdens of the job. You will still look at people suspiciously, still see what others do not see or choose to ignore and always will look at the rest of the law enforcement world with a respect for what they do; only grown in a lifetime of knowing. Never think for one moment you are escaping from that life. You are only escaping the 'job' and merely being allowed to leave 'active' duty.

So what I wish for you is that whenever you ease into retirement, in your heart you never forget for one moment that 'Blessed are the Peacemakers for they shall be called children of God,' and you are still a member of the greatest fraternity the world has ever known.




#64 hinzdl

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 07:34 AM

I have been placing some stories I've written on the Fort Worth Police Dept on this post and thought I'd let you know about some other places to look for FWPD stories, are at the Fort Worth Police Historical Assoc. webpage in our Newsletters....... FWPD Historical Assoc or at Panther's Rest. I hope you enjoy these......Dale

#65 hinzdl

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Posted 16 September 2010 - 03:51 PM

Here's some more FWPD history to browse through, stories and photos

Panther's Rest

#66 Phil Phillips

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 02:10 PM

In response to Post #60 involving the identity of a building, I have covered S. Main, S. Jennings, Hemphill, Magnolia, N. Main, N. Sylvania, E. Lancaster and E. Rosedale with no luck. Didn't have a chance for Camp Bowie, Jacksboro Hwy or other possibilities.

#67 Cowtown Mike

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 02:20 PM

Phil,
I have one of my friends looking at the photo as he knows most of the buildings having been here forever and in commercial real estate.

#68 EwingFTW

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 08:05 AM

Phil,
I have one of my friends looking at the photo as he knows most of the buildings having been here forever and in commercial real estate.


Thanks. I hope we can find it.
Dale Hinz has already identified one of the officers who
later retired as a Captain.


#69 Duke Lane

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 09:50 AM

Woody was a FWPD Sargent that was assigned to Carlson's DriveInn and Root Beer Stand on University Dr. in the late 50's and early 60's while I was attending Paschal High School. This might have been an "extra" job as far as I know but he was there nearly every evening - especially on weekends. He drove his police Harley and was there to keep peace and quit amongst the teens which continually drove around and through the drive in with their loud pipes and blazing radios. What was different about Woody, he was one of the kindest person you would ever meet and was the kids best friend. He associated with the teens like he was one of them and he actually won their respect by him respecting them. If he caught you drinking he would pour out your stash and if you had too much he would always see to it someone got you home - but your car stayed there till the next day! He cut up and joked with the kids just like he was one of them. I knew several that had been into some trouble and Woody would spend a lot of time with these kids showing how to change their ways before it was too late, and he was nearly always successful.
Cajunmike - I'm think it might have been Lawrence but not real sure. I was wondering the same thing after reading a very interesting article on JFK's assasination involving Lawrence Wood.
I hope EwingFTW will read the the following article and give us any idea how much is factual or if he could add to it.

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/cowtown.txt

The article is "The Cowtown Connection" by Duke Lane and tells about the coincidence of some odd Fort Worth Police activity at the same time of JFK"s assasination that involved FWPD officers LE Wood, HW Sinclair and others. It was very interesting to me and I doubt if many locals have ever read it.


Just a little additional FW Police History. In the article you refer to, The Cowtown Connection, under the section The Unidentified Man, a fingerprint expert is referred to. This officer was Lloyd Courtney ID#95. He retired in Feb 1984 but returned to the Department as a part-time identification employee. He and his wife were killed in their southwest Fort Worth home. A daughter was convicted of the double murder. Hope you find this interesting, another part of the Department's history.


If this actually finds anybody that's posted here from two years ago, I'll be pleasantly surprised.

Glad y'all enjoyed the article, it was my first on the JFK topic and I've added several since of a similar "debunking" nature (as you might remember, the major thrust of "Cowtown" was about a "suspect under arrest" in FW on 11/22/63 supposedly being a FW native, David Atlee Phillips, who was then a senior CIA officer, who was actually Kenneth Wilson, the cousin-in-law of a guy who was detained briefly in connection with the assassination), more recent ones unmasking false witnesses to the shooting in downtown Dallas.

Woody was deceased by the time I'd written the article back in '92 or thereabouts (wow, how time flies!), HW Sinclair was living out by Terrell then, and WD "Crash" Roberts was still working dispatch (as a civilian) in the North Substation in the Stockyards and living over by the Arlington Airport (I understand he's since succumbed ... to cancer?). Crash related how he'd attained that colorful nickname, and I recall that he, like Woody, was a motor officer until the day he'd retired as well.

As many times as I've driven up Riverside to Five Corners (my girlfriend lives in Oakhurst, and is a Realtor associated with Downtown Fort Worth, Inc.), I've never noticed the drive-in he was at when Donald House (who had a remote resemblance to Oswald, interestingly enough) drove by and the events described in "Cowtown" unfolded. Of course, I usually think of it after I've passed through the area and resolve to look more closely the next time ... when the same thing happens! I imagine that it's been razed in favor of something else in the almost-50 years since then. Maybe Papaw or EwingFTW remembers something more about it?

I may update "Cowtown" (it was all factual, btw!) to include the identity of "the fingerprinting expert," but more to the point wonder if the article or a slightly revised version of it would be of use to either the Police or City historical associations, focusing more on the events in Fort Worth than the rest of the rigamarole going on in that other city to the east. I spoke with someone connected with FWPD history a number of years ago - probably before 2000 - and he'd expressed an interest, but I guess life interfered and that email or phone call was the end of that. Maybe it's time to pick up that thread again, particularly in light of the whole deal going on now about the new memorial down by the Hilton.

Of course, I might call in a quid pro quo from time to time in support of other research, particularly dealing with general local police procedures from that era (I was an OSI cop in the Air Force in the mid- to late '70s, but I don't consider that "real" police work dealing with service-related stuff, tho' my brother the ex-AP very much does). I've met and interviewed a number of DPD officers, including several motor officers who were part of JFK's motorcade escort and Jim Leavelle who was handcuffed to Oswald when he was shot, but I hesitate sometimes to call on them for some questions that they might consider "sensitive" or too close to home.

Anyway, let me know if there's any interest there. In the meantime, another of my more recent works involved a guy who'd been on TV a lot claiming to see guys with a rifle behind the picket fence that y'all might enjoy: "Freeway Man" on the same site as "Cowtown." There are others that aren't online presently that I'm happy to share with anyone who's interested as well.

(I'd love for more locals to read "Cowtown"!)

Be safe out there with all the Superbowlers in town!

#70 hinzdl

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 04:31 PM


Woody was a FWPD Sargent that was assigned to Carlson's DriveInn and Root Beer Stand on University Dr. in the late 50's and early 60's while I was attending Paschal High School. This might have been an "extra" job as far as I know but he was there nearly every evening - especially on weekends. He drove his police Harley and was there to keep peace and quit amongst the teens which continually drove around and through the drive in with their loud pipes and blazing radios. What was different about Woody, he was one of the kindest person you would ever meet and was the kids best friend. He associated with the teens like he was one of them and he actually won their respect by him respecting them. If he caught you drinking he would pour out your stash and if you had too much he would always see to it someone got you home - but your car stayed there till the next day! He cut up and joked with the kids just like he was one of them. I knew several that had been into some trouble and Woody would spend a lot of time with these kids showing how to change their ways before it was too late, and he was nearly always successful.
Cajunmike - I'm think it might have been Lawrence but not real sure. I was wondering the same thing after reading a very interesting article on JFK's assasination involving Lawrence Wood.
I hope EwingFTW will read the the following article and give us any idea how much is factual or if he could add to it.

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/cowtown.txt

The article is "The Cowtown Connection" by Duke Lane and tells about the coincidence of some odd Fort Worth Police activity at the same time of JFK"s assasination that involved FWPD officers LE Wood, HW Sinclair and others. It was very interesting to me and I doubt if many locals have ever read it.


Just a little additional FW Police History. In the article you refer to, The Cowtown Connection, under the section The Unidentified Man, a fingerprint expert is referred to. This officer was Lloyd Courtney ID#95. He retired in Feb 1984 but returned to the Department as a part-time identification employee. He and his wife were killed in their southwest Fort Worth home. A daughter was convicted of the double murder. Hope you find this interesting, another part of the Department's history.


If this actually finds anybody that's posted here from two years ago, I'll be pleasantly surprised.

Glad y'all enjoyed the article, it was my first on the JFK topic and I've added several since of a similar "debunking" nature (as you might remember, the major thrust of "Cowtown" was about a "suspect under arrest" in FW on 11/22/63 supposedly being a FW native, David Atlee Phillips, who was then a senior CIA officer, who was actually Kenneth Wilson, the cousin-in-law of a guy who was detained briefly in connection with the assassination), more recent ones unmasking false witnesses to the shooting in downtown Dallas.

Woody was deceased by the time I'd written the article back in '92 or thereabouts (wow, how time flies!), HW Sinclair was living out by Terrell then, and WD "Crash" Roberts was still working dispatch (as a civilian) in the North Substation in the Stockyards and living over by the Arlington Airport (I understand he's since succumbed ... to cancer?). Crash related how he'd attained that colorful nickname, and I recall that he, like Woody, was a motor officer until the day he'd retired as well.

As many times as I've driven up Riverside to Five Corners (my girlfriend lives in Oakhurst, and is a Realtor associated with Downtown Fort Worth, Inc.), I've never noticed the drive-in he was at when Donald House (who had a remote resemblance to Oswald, interestingly enough) drove by and the events described in "Cowtown" unfolded. Of course, I usually think of it after I've passed through the area and resolve to look more closely the next time ... when the same thing happens! I imagine that it's been razed in favor of something else in the almost-50 years since then. Maybe Papaw or EwingFTW remembers something more about it?

I may update "Cowtown" (it was all factual, btw!) to include the identity of "the fingerprinting expert," but more to the point wonder if the article or a slightly revised version of it would be of use to either the Police or City historical associations, focusing more on the events in Fort Worth than the rest of the rigamarole going on in that other city to the east. I spoke with someone connected with FWPD history a number of years ago - probably before 2000 - and he'd expressed an interest, but I guess life interfered and that email or phone call was the end of that. Maybe it's time to pick up that thread again, particularly in light of the whole deal going on now about the new memorial down by the Hilton.

Of course, I might call in a quid pro quo from time to time in support of other research, particularly dealing with general local police procedures from that era (I was an OSI cop in the Air Force in the mid- to late '70s, but I don't consider that "real" police work dealing with service-related stuff, tho' my brother the ex-AP very much does). I've met and interviewed a number of DPD officers, including several motor officers who were part of JFK's motorcade escort and Jim Leavelle who was handcuffed to Oswald when he was shot, but I hesitate sometimes to call on them for some questions that they might consider "sensitive" or too close to home.

Anyway, let me know if there's any interest there. In the meantime, another of my more recent works involved a guy who'd been on TV a lot claiming to see guys with a rifle behind the picket fence that y'all might enjoy: "Freeway Man" on the same site as "Cowtown." There are others that aren't online presently that I'm happy to share with anyone who's interested as well.

(I'd love for more locals to read "Cowtown"!)

Be safe out there with all the Superbowlers in town!




We are very much alive on this thread. I'm a founding member of the FW Police Historical Association and would be interested in any information you might have. I'm not sure if the theater you are talking about is the one I'm thinking about. Just north of Lancaster on the east side of Riverside Dr was the Riverside Drive-In. The entrance was not more than a half a block. I believe it was a Twin and the screens have been razed. I remember as a kid going to it a couple of times....I don't know if I'm the one you spoke with in the Historical Assn. but we still meet the second Tuesday of each month at the Police Training Center on Calvert and would be happy for you to attend. In December Paul Vinson talked about his role as a Star-Telegram Staff reporter and his coverage of the story

#71 Papaw

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 10:14 PM

"Cowtown" is a great article that should be read by anyone that is interested in DFW history.
Fort Worth has always had a great Police Department with some very dedicated people and some very interesting personalities. Another interesting character is old "Smitty", and actually as long as I have known him I never really knew his first name as he always just went by Smitty - his last name was Smith. He lived East of 35 on 1187 and loved to trade and make deals on anything - mostly junk. His yard was full of all sorts of farm equipment, trailers etc. I remember once he was peddling an "electronic pest destroyer" that he said would eliminate all bugs etc. and you would never see any in your house as long as you keep this gadget plugged in. I knew better but finally gave in and bought one just to shut him up for awhile. I think I saw more roaches after I plugged it in than I ever saw before. He kept saying - give it more time.
I'll never forget the time he came speeding up in his patrol car and telling me about the Cullan Davis Mansion killing. He was one of the officers dispatched to the mansion right after the murder. It was news to me as it was the first I had heard about it and he was so excited he couldn't remember any of the details. He moved from 1187 to 35W out nearly to Alvarado. Last time I saw him he wasn't getting around very well. I need to check on him.
On a side note, I really hate to see the blow up of publicized reports when an officer is involved in an alcohol or negligent related situation. These occurrences happen in all professions and have since the beginning of time. I think the percentage of people involved has not changed and is probably is even lower now. As an old Jr. High principal (Dyes) at McClain used to say, there will always be the 3 percenters. I think one of the main differences today is the news media. The news media can be a police departments best friend or worst enemy. And unfortunately it seems to often be the latter.

#72 EwingFTW

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Posted 03 February 2011 - 04:59 PM

.........Another interesting character is old "Smitty", and actually as long as I have known him I never really knew his first name as he always just went by Smitty - his last name was Smith. .............He moved from 1187 to 35W out nearly to Alvarado. Last time I saw him he wasn't getting around very well. I need to check on him..................



Posted Image That sounds like Douglas L. "Red" Smith. He also went by "Smitty." He was one of the first K-9 Officers.

#73 hinzdl

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 01:34 PM

Jay William Paxton
June 5, 1906 – January 4, 1991


Fingerprinting for identification purposes became a useful tool for law enforcement in 1880 when Dr. Henry Faulds, a British surgeon, devised a method of classifying fingerprints and the use of printers ink to record them. The first systematic use of fingerprints to identify criminals in the United States was used in 1903 by the New York prison system. By 1924 an act of Congress established the Identification Division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation which twenty-four years later boasted 100 million files.

Fort Worth began building it own fingerprint files in 1912 or 1913, printing all individuals who entered the city jail suspected of a crime. By 1951 newspapers and movies depicted police officers collecting fingerprints as characters snooping around with a magnifying glass. However, Captain Jay Paxton of the Fort Worth Police Department Identification Bureau told how inaccurate this idea was. “The main value of our Bureau is not in the fingerprints we try to collect at the scene of crimes but our records.” Paxton was referring to the data he and his men had gathered over the years. If the files were stack on top of each other they would rival the Empire State Building in height. The Identification Bureau had more files than there were people in Fort Worth. Paxton passed up many promotions and transfer to more “exciting” job just to watch over his files.

Jay William Paxton was born in Fort Worth on June 5, 1906 to Carl and Hermone Ackers Paxton. He grew up on the Southside of town at 2905 S. Jennings and in 1914 was run over on Page Street by a car driven by Dr. Webb Walker, receiving only a broken leg and bruised head. In February, 1937 he married Bessie Sanches who for many years was a nursing supervisor before her death in 1973.

Paxton was highly respected for his work in the Identification Bureau and mentored many officers who later became leaders in the Department His dedication to justice (not simply prosecution) and fairness are evident by an extraordinary case. A man was imprisoned for many years following a conviction for murder in the course of a robbery. At the time of the initial investigation Paxton was bothered by the lack of fingerprints of the convicted man at the crime scene and no evidence of the use of gloves or the intentional eradication of prints. In addition a rogue fingerprint was found in an incriminating spot which did not match the convicted murder’s prints or anyone else whose presence at the scene could be explained.

Jay had an uncanny ability to remember a fingerprint and years later after the conviction of the man for murder, Paxton was classifying a set of prints from a man who had been arrested for burglary. One of his prints matched the unidentified print at the murder scene. When the burglar was confronted with this evidence he confessed to the murder and a wrongfully convicted man was freed.Paxton also had clear eyes to the ways of the world and few illusions about his fellow man; however, this did not dull his sense of humor. His comments were never cruel but often hilarious in the way they illuminated the foibles of those around him. Many times his comments were directed at himself.
Captain Jay William Paxton ID #8, retired from the Fort Worth Police Department on March 1, 1970 after thirty-six years of service. He lived another two decades giving him time to pamper his prized chrysanthemums. If he wasn’t dabbling in printer’s ink he was gently tilling the soil around his flowers.

Sources for story:
Letter dated 6/1/1992 from Jay L. Paxton to Bettye Boisselier, Development Associate – Texas Christian University in reference to the Jay W & Bessie Paxton Nursing Scholarship. (Jay W. Paxton is Jay L.’s uncle)
Fort Worth Star Telegram, 01/17/1914 pg 5, “Auto Hits Boy”.
Ibid, 09/28/1973 pg 4, “Mrs. Bessie Paxton”.
Dallas Morning News, 02/28/1960, “Chrysanthemum Society to Give Annual Show”.
Unknown newspaper article 1951, “Identification Bureau Tirelessly Traces and Traps Wanted Criminal”, by Blair Justice, page 56.
Interview with Nancy Hobson of Fort Worth, Jay W. Paxton’s niece.
Interview with Darrell Hobson of Fort Worth, Jay W. Paxton’s grandnephew.

#74 Papaw

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 08:30 AM

Interesting article hinzdl. Jay was also an active member of his church - Mathews Memorial Methodist on W. Berry.

#75 hinzdl

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 07:07 AM

Thanks for the comment PawPaw. While Jay had retired by the time I joined the department in 1970, his name was still resounding around the halls of the City Hall. The location for the police department has only changed three times that I can find. From 2nd & Rusk (Commerce) to 1000 Throckmorton to 350 W Belknap, the last in about 1985 when the county took over housing Fort Worth's criminal element. I hope you and other members of the forum will take a look at two links below for other stories about the police department, it too has an amasing history.The first is my website called "Panther's Rest" and the second is the Fort Worth Police Historical Associations newsletters which are published quarterly.


http://www.freewebs.com/hinzd/ and

www.fortworthpd.com/FWPHA/FWPOHA.html

#76 Cowtown Mike

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 03:24 PM

Thanks for the comment PawPaw. While Jay had retired by the time I joined the department in 1970, his name was still resounding around the halls of the City Hall. The location for the police department has only changed three times that I can find. From 2nd & Rusk (Commerce) to 1000 Throckmorton to 350 W Belknap, the last in about 1985 when the county took over housing Fort Worth's criminal element. I hope you and other members of the forum will take a look at two links below for other stories about the police department, it too has an amasing history.The first is my website called "Panther's Rest" and the second is the Fort Worth Police Historical Associations newsletters which are published quarterly.


http://www.freewebs.com/hinzd/ and

www.fortworthpd.com/FWPHA/FWPOHA.html



#77 Cowtown Mike

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 03:26 PM

I had a former neighbor who joined the force around that same time. Kenneth Rucker. I last ran into him back in 2002 on the Eastside and he had retired.

#78 EwingFTW

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 02:52 PM


The South Division Crime Prevention Unit is planning the 16th annual
“Crime Prevention and Family Day.” There will be many exhibitors and
a large citizen participation in the “Crime Prevention and Family Day.”


When: Apr 30, 2011, 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Where: Aldi/Dollar Tree Shopping Center - 7440 McCart @ Sycamore School Rd


Members of the Fort Worth Police Historical Association will be on hand
with several exhibits.

Other events planned for this year’s Family Day include a Vehicle Display area,
Health Checks, Crime Prevention and Public Safety exhibits, a children's area
with games and activities, and a lot more exhibitors.


#79 David Love

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 08:07 PM

Has the FWPD reserve officer program been reinstated?

http://www.star-tele...er-program.html

Better Business Bureau:  A place to find or post valid complaints for auto delerships and maintenance facilities. (New Features) If you have a valid gripe about auto dealerships, this is the place to voice it.


#80 hinzdl

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 04:00 PM

At this time the Reserve Program is still suspended. I'll post something when the program is reinstated....

#81 David Love

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 06:06 PM

At this time the Reserve Program is still suspended. I'll post something when the program is reinstated....

Any word on why it's taking so long?

Seems to be a paperwork thing, and I know the PD is nothing if not paperwork intensive, but it seemed to be something the FWPD failed to do and not the reserve officers. The article was very vague so maybe I missed something.

Better Business Bureau:  A place to find or post valid complaints for auto delerships and maintenance facilities. (New Features) If you have a valid gripe about auto dealerships, this is the place to voice it.


#82 hinzdl

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 08:00 AM

The program has been in effect since the 1960s but the laws have changed in regard to collective bargaining which has cause the PD to look into the program to make sure it is in compliance with Texas Law. A letter was filed with the Attorney General requesting an opinion. Once the opinion is recieved, the program will either be back in business or have to be negotiated into the next contract (city-pd).

#83 David Love

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 03:42 PM

Glad to hear they're making progress.

Don't these guys work for free, as in volunteers? Would the contract negotiations have to do with paid hours being taken away from full time officers?

Better Business Bureau:  A place to find or post valid complaints for auto delerships and maintenance facilities. (New Features) If you have a valid gripe about auto dealerships, this is the place to voice it.


#84 Brian Luenser

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:08 PM

Speaking of the Fort Worth Police. Who says all they do is eat donuts. (Of course I can't know for sure they aren't running for Duncan Donuts.) :lol:

Posted Image
www.fortworthview.com

#85 EwingFTW

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 11:28 AM

Speaking of the Fort Worth Police. Who says all they do is eat donuts. (Of course I can't know for sure they aren't running for Duncan Donuts.) :lol:



Looks like the current Recruit class. They are in the midst of a 30 VERY tough weeks of training.

#86 EwingFTW

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 09:32 AM

I posted this on the Forum's Community Calendar for June, but I wanted
to let everyone know about the Panther Badge that all Fort Worth Police Officers
have worn since 1912:

Event Date: 09-June 12 9:00 am

On the morning of June 9, 1912 Police Chief Renfro assembled his officers
at the Fort Worth City Hall.

At 9:00 am Chief Renfro asked the officers to remove the shield badge that they had been
issued and began passing out the Panther Badge.

For the first time, the officers pinned the panther badge on their uniforms.

On June 9, 2012 the officers of the Fort Worth Police Department will re-enact that event
as it occurred 100 years ago. The event is scheduled to be held at the old City Hall site,
1000 Throckmorton St.

The Fort Worth Police Historical Association designed a special Centennial Panther Badge
and every Fort Worth Police Officer will be given this special badge that can be officially
worn until June 9, 2013.

Fort Worth is very unique in that they belong to a handful of police departments in the
United States to have worn the same badge for 100 years.

You can keep up and get more details plus pictures of the Centennial badge at:
Centennial Badge




#87 hinzdl

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 07:37 AM

It has been a while since I've been able to post to this thread. But to let you history buffs know, 2012 is the 100th anniversary of the Fort Worth Police Department's badge. We have been wearing a Panther topped badge since Chief JW Renfro authorized them on June 9, 1912 at 9:00am. On June 9, 2012 we will hold an Centennial Badge pining ceromony on the steps of the Tarrant County Court house beginning at 8:00am with the pinning of a Centennial badge designed by the Fort Worth Police Historical Assoc. The Assoc was able to established funding with the help of Community leaders, businesses and individual to furnish each Active Duty officer with one of the Centennial Badges. The design is the same as the original with the Panther proudly cresting a shield with a five point star in the middle. The different is this badge is multi-colored (Gold Panther, Silver shield and blue background behind the star. The official badge is all silver or gold depending on the officer's rank. Silver for officers and detectives and gold for supervisory and commnad ranks. This Centennial badge will be authorized to be worn by every Fort Worth Police officer for a period of one year. If you get a chance meet us on this date and see some history first hand.

The original Panther badge was issued at police headquarter's, then 1000 Throckmorton, were the present AD Marshal Municipal Courts Bldg now stands. The reason to have it on the County House steps is that the county seat of goverment has been a constant in Fort Worth.....

It's going to be fun....Hope to see you there.....

#88 JOHNNY DONUTS

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 09:38 PM

A few history pieces I have..
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#89 FortWorthLowrider

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 03:24 PM

Welcome Johnny!
TRUE CLASSICS CAR CLUB
Fort Worth Texas

United Lowrider Council

#90 tjcomedy

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 03:25 PM

I posted this on the Forum's Community Calendar for June, but I wanted
to let everyone know about the Panther Badge that all Fort Worth Police Officers
have worn since 1912:

Event Date: 09-June 12 9:00 am

On the morning of June 9, 1912 Police Chief Renfro assembled his officers
at the Fort Worth City Hall.

At 9:00 am Chief Renfro asked the officers to remove the shield badge that they had been
issued and began passing out the Panther Badge.

For the first time, the officers pinned the panther badge on their uniforms.

On June 9, 2012 the officers of the Fort Worth Police Department will re-enact that event
as it occurred 100 years ago. The event is scheduled to be held at the old City Hall site,
1000 Throckmorton St.

The Fort Worth Police Historical Association designed a special Centennial Panther Badge
and every Fort Worth Police Officer will be given this special badge that can be officially
worn until June 9, 2013.

Fort Worth is very unique in that they belong to a handful of police departments in the
United States to have worn the same badge for 100 years.

You can keep up and get more details plus pictures of the Centennial badge at:
Centennial Badge

 

JW Renfro was my great-grandfather. 



#91 John T Roberts

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 05:27 PM

Welcome to the Forum!






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