Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Traffic Calming Devices


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#1 AndyN

AndyN

    Skyscraper Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midland, Tx. for now

Posted 21 April 2009 - 10:36 AM

Zig Zag stripes being tested in Virginia.

http://www.wtop.com/...1654423&nid=732


Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#2 longhornz32

longhornz32

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 337 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth, TX
  • Interests:Architect, photography, woodworking, jazz, guitar/bass/saxophone, sculpture.

Posted 21 April 2009 - 11:18 AM

More like Drunk Confusing Device

#3 AndyN

AndyN

    Skyscraper Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midland, Tx. for now

Posted 21 April 2009 - 11:20 AM

I dunno, that may be a boon to DWI. They could actually walk that line.
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#4 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 10 January 2012 - 07:15 AM

Roundabouts have been installed along Elizabeth Blvd. in Southside.

http://www.star-tele...hood-takes.html

I saw these in place a week before Christmas while going to a party, and couldn't resist the temptation to take a couple of passes through them. I think the idea is great, it does slow traffic on what had been a short speedway at times, but the circular drives seem a little small and the turns very sharp, but maybe that is part of the desired design rather than a result of not being able to acquire extra right-of-way at the corners. One of the comments posted deals with moving vans, but there are plenty of side-streets that allow access to any residence in the area, they just have more stop signs to deal with. The roundabouts do not require a stop if I remember, just a serious slow-down and yield, which saves fuel from stop-start driving. It seems the nicest parts of the city (area) are getting roundabouts but none are being installed in lower socio-economic areas.

#5 Electricron

Electricron

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 550 posts

Posted 10 January 2012 - 10:07 AM

It seems the nicest parts of the city (area) are getting roundabouts but none are being installed in lower socio-economic areas.


Southside have TIFs in place to help fund improvements, including the roundabouts. Do the other lower socio-economic areas within the city have them? Always look at where the money for projects is coming from before suggesting unequal/unfair treatment.

#6 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,438 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 10 January 2012 - 11:13 AM

If I'm reading the article correctly, the money for this was a from a bond package, not the TIF.

#7 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 15 June 2014 - 07:46 PM

Gordon Dickson S-T Article on Area Roundabouts:

 

http://www.star-tele...r-smoother.html



#8 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 16 June 2014 - 07:02 AM

I would love to see one at Sycamore School and McCart. At peak times, perhaps, the long traffic light is necessary. But at off-peak times, there's no reason to stop at that intersection. On peak times, traffic lights can control flow through the intersection even if there is a roundabout.
My blog: Doohickie

#9 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 16 June 2014 - 07:30 AM

I actually like the ones on Elizabeth Blvd.  They slow traffic and they make it really nice if you are on a bicycle heading northbound, across Elizabeth.  If there's a car coming, you stop and yield, if there isn't a car, you can proceed.



#10 RenaissanceMan

RenaissanceMan

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 16 June 2014 - 07:45 AM

I'm still holding out hope to one day see one at University and W7/Camp Bowie

#11 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 16 June 2014 - 07:56 AM

I actually like the ones on Elizabeth Blvd.  They slow traffic and they make it really nice if you are on a bicycle heading northbound, across Elizabeth.  If there's a car coming, you stop and yield, if there isn't a car, you can proceed.


If there's a car coming, you adjust your speed and tuck in behind him without stopping. (Even better.)
My blog: Doohickie

#12 Russ Graham

Russ Graham

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Ft Worth

Posted 16 June 2014 - 08:17 AM

I'm still holding out hope to one day see one at University and W7/Camp Bowie

 

What about a roundabout with a below-grade pass-through for north-south traffic staying on University? 

 

I bring this up because crossing this intersection on foot would be hard without some signalized control of the N-S traffic on University. 

 

I don't think Fort Worth is ready for roundabouts - until the following law is learned and consistently followed and enforced: If a pedestrian is in a crosswalk, all lanes of traffic must stop until the pedestrian has completed the crossing. 



#13 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 16 June 2014 - 11:15 AM

I would agree with a pass-through for N-S University.
My blog: Doohickie

#14 Electricron

Electricron

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 550 posts

Posted 17 June 2014 - 06:01 PM

I would have thought the best traffic calming device would actually cause vehicles to come to a complete stop, i.e. a stop sign.

Traffic circles, or whatever other name you wish to call them, don't actually make vehicles come to a full stop, so I fail to understand why so many considering them traffic calming devices.



#15 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 17 June 2014 - 08:58 PM

I think most people slow down because no one stops.  Stop signs don't work.  I have one a half block up the street from me and about 50% of the people run it because it is a "traffic calming" four-way stop.  Years ago, we had just a two-way with the stop sign on the cross street, and there were many accidents at the intersection.  After the city did a traffic study at the neighborhood's request, and stop signs were installed at every other intersection going in all directions, there is less traffic going through the neighborhood.



#16 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,119 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 17 June 2014 - 10:58 PM

I really dislike the idea of roundabouts on busy streets. They are nerve wracking in a vehicle or bike, and there's no way as a pedestrian I'm just going to walk out onto a crosswalk and assume everyone will yield for me. On smaller streets like Elizabeth, I think they work very well, less noise and pollution from accelerating vehicles and easy to navigate with any mode. They seem to take up more space to, I like my grids nice and square. 



#17 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 17 June 2014 - 11:21 PM

Here is the full text of the reply I made to Gordon Dickson's call for comments about roundabouts for his S-T article:

 

Roundabouts make sense where there is room to install them. The greatest amount of energy needed to propel an automobile is used to get it started from a complete stop. A well-designed roundabout makes it possible for a driver to slow and yield rather than stop when approaching the intersection in many cases rather than having to stop unnecessarily when there is no other traffic. This also can help travel time from point-to-point, since slowing down for an intersection is more time-effective than having to come to a complete stop. A roundabout can offer more challenge to a pedestrian trying to cross one of the intersecting streets, but placing the crosswalk where the lanes separate before the circle helps by requiring the pedestrian to only cross one lane at a time, or this can be addressed by moving the crosswalk further away from the intersection. Another consideration is that when replacing an electric signal a roundabout eliminates the need for expensive mechanisms, occasional timing adjustments, electricity use, and occasional replacement from collisions, mechanical failure, or vandalism. 
 
Any driver who has experienced frustration at having to stop for red signs and signals when no other traffic is present can appreciate the advantages that well-built roundabouts provide.


#18 Russ Graham

Russ Graham

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Ft Worth

Posted 18 June 2014 - 09:08 AM

I would have thought the best traffic calming device would actually cause vehicles to come to a complete stop, i.e. a stop sign.

Traffic circles, or whatever other name you wish to call them, don't actually make vehicles come to a full stop, so I fail to understand why so many considering them traffic calming devices.

 

If I may hazard a guess at why people say that --- it's because all vehicles must slow down to get through a roundabout.  As opposed to signalized intersections where many cars will get a green or yellow light and can maintain full speed through the intersection.  (Not compared to an all-way stop - which would not work for a high traffic intersection)



#19 renamerusk

renamerusk

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,857 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Worth South

Posted 18 June 2014 - 09:09 PM

 

I would have thought the best traffic calming device would actually cause vehicles to come to a complete stop, i.e. a stop sign.

Traffic circles, or whatever other name you wish to call them, don't actually make vehicles come to a full stop, so I fail to understand why so many considering them traffic calming devices.

 

If I may hazard a guess at why people say that --- it's because all vehicles must slow down to get through a roundabout.  As opposed to signalized intersections where many cars will get a green or yellow light and can maintain full speed through the intersection.  (Not compared to an all-way stop - which would not work for a high traffic intersection)

 

 

  If you will,  when two freeways intersect, the curvature of the ramps are nothing but a "roundabout" on steroids forcing cars to yield, enter and exit a high traffic intersection without stopping.   Could you imagine a stop sign at the intersection of two freeways? :eek:

 

 I think Fort Worth is ready for roundabouts or whatever you want to call them since the drivers here surely have little problem managing the mix master and the likes.



#20 mmmdan

mmmdan

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 209 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridglea Hills

Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:55 AM

I don't know about you, but it seems that at just about every intersection I'm at with a light I always end up stopping.  It's pretty rare that I ever get to drive right through (except for the few stretches of the few streets where the lights are timed).  It seems to me that in general, the green light is just long enough to let through all the cars that were stopped by the red light.  It's only a few lucky cars that happen to get to the light while it's still green and the queue has cleared that can make it through without stopping.

 

Of course this does not apply in the early morning hours before the sun is up and in the evening.



#21 Russ Graham

Russ Graham

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Ft Worth

Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:46 AM

It's only a few lucky cars that happen to get to the light while it's still green and the queue has cleared that can make it through without stopping.

 

Right - but these happy few go through at very high speed.  (like typically 10-15 mph over posted speed limits).

 

The point is that if a roundabout was there they would have to slow down or crash into the center median.



#22 RD Milhollin

RD Milhollin

    Surrounding Cities Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Haltom City

Posted 24 October 2014 - 11:17 AM

Riverside Drive Bridge over I-820 Jim Wright to open Monday:

 

http://fwbusinesspre...pen-Monday.aspx

 

The north end of the bridge approach incorporates a roundabout as part of the traffic control (hence the choice of topics to post this in)

 

Riverside and Sylvania are both parallel to I-35W and would help to provide alternate travel routes for local traffic if and when connected to the rest of the street grid, helping to keep unnecessary traffic from entering and leaving the freeway system. Riverside does not have direct access to the Wright expressway so that traffic is undisturbed while the bridge allows easy access from one side to another. There is a gap in Riverside Drive between just south of the freeway and SH-183/28th Street that will need to be built through at some point.

 

Traffic arteries (with access to businesses) built parallel but separated from freeways, elimination of frontage roads, and unconnected viaducts for local arterials to cross the freeway would go a long way toward providing alternate routes for local traffic and keep browsing shopper traffic from clogging up entry and exit ramps for freeways.



#23 gdvanc

gdvanc

    Elite Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 740 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Arlington

Posted 27 October 2014 - 01:15 PM

I don't know about you, but it seems that at just about every intersection I'm at with a light I always end up stopping.  It's pretty rare that I ever get to drive right through (except for the few stretches of the few streets where the lights are timed).  It seems to me that in general, the green light is just long enough to let through all the cars that were stopped by the red light.  It's only a few lucky cars that happen to get to the light while it's still green and the queue has cleared that can make it through without stopping.

 

Of course this does not apply in the early morning hours before the sun is up and in the evening.

 

Someone posted many, many years ago on this forum that traffic signal timing in the Fort was becoming increasingly poor (and economically wasteful) because the city had cut the handful of engineers whose job it was to optimize the signals. It seems like here in the 21st Century that the technology should exist to monitor traffic flows and adjust signals in real time. The ability to do so has to be on the horizon.



#24 gdvanc

gdvanc

    Elite Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 740 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Arlington

Posted 27 October 2014 - 01:17 PM

On A New Shared Street In Chicago, There Are No Sidewalks, No Lights, And Almost No Signs

 

They call it innovative; I call it retro.



#25 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,119 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 27 October 2014 - 01:52 PM

Museum place is not to dissimilar. 7th and Cliburn's intersection is totally flat, there's no painted crosswalks, only stop signs for the drivers.

 

Atleast that's how I remember it, I've only walked through 2 or 3 times since the apartment project finished.



#26 Russ Graham

Russ Graham

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Ft Worth

Posted 27 October 2014 - 02:21 PM

Austin, one big difference is the intersection in the article has big painted crosswalks, where 7th and Cliburn doesn't.  It also has very poorly lit signage, so it's sometimes hard for cars to see the stop signs in the dark.  The result is it's not really clear exactly where cars are supposed to stop to let pedestrians cross.

 

I expect all that to get ironed out if and when the rest of the empty blocks finish building out.  (knock on wood, fingers crossed, etc).

 

I think a couple of mini-roundabouts at 7th and Arch Adams, and 7th and Van Cliburn, would make those two intersections a lot more user friendly for both drivers and pedestrians.



#27 John T Roberts

John T Roberts

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Fort Worth
  • Interests:Architecture, Photography, Bicycling, Historic Preservation

Posted 27 October 2014 - 04:34 PM

I know there's enough room for small plazas, but I'm not sure there is enough space for mini-roundabouts.  I do think that better lighting and finish-out of the Museum Place would help visibility.



#28 gdvanc

gdvanc

    Elite Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 740 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Arlington

Posted 30 October 2014 - 09:26 AM

...It seems like here in the 21st Century that the technology should exist to monitor traffic flows and adjust signals in real time. The ability to do so has to be on the horizon.

 

 

UTA Students Build Mobile App to Help Traffic Congestion

 

Bam.



#29 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,438 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 28 November 2016 - 09:56 PM

Councilwoman Ann Zadeh is calling for the city to get behind state legislation to lower neighborhood street speed limits from 30 to 25 mph:

 

http://www.star-tele...e117390773.html



#30 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 28 November 2016 - 11:08 PM

I could get behind that. 


My blog: Doohickie

#31 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,438 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 28 November 2016 - 11:39 PM

Same here.  And given that few neighborhoods that use the current default speed limit post the speed limit, there's very little cost in the way of signage.  It's just a matter of increasing awareness.  And enforcement to some degree, but I would assume very few traffic tickets are issued for speeding on residential streets.



#32 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,438 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 14 December 2016 - 11:34 PM

And just like that, the speed limit push is pulled from the city's legislative platform:

 

http://www.star-tele...e120930743.html

 

It's concerning that they've suddenly decided that they didn't have enough information two months ago.  What more important subjects have they plowed forward on with too little information?



#33 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,119 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 28 April 2017 - 12:18 PM

Flashing red traffic signals testing at Henderson and College on Magnolia.


http://myemail.const...aid=3z9TccNfyyE

#34 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 28 April 2017 - 12:54 PM

Flashing red traffic signals testing at Henderson and College on Magnolia.


http://myemail.const...aid=3z9TccNfyyE


Options for the ultimate outcome include a permanent change to four-way stop signs, an ongoing mix of flashing reds and normal signal operations, or a return to current signal operations, depending on the results.

 

The other option they didn't mention is flashing red in one direction and flashing yellow in the other, giving priority to one street (the equivalent of a 2-way stop sign).  They use those a lot up north where I come from, but I rarely see them here.

 

I wish they would do surveys across the city for traffic light options.  For instance, the closest major intersection to my house is Sycamore School Rd. and McCart Ave.  During rush hour and popular shopping hours, the traffic signals are clearly needed.  But late in the evening, a 4-way stop even at that intersection would be fine. 


My blog: Doohickie

#35 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,438 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 28 April 2017 - 01:14 PM

I noticed the Henderson signal when I was over that way for lunch. At one time, Hwy. 26 in North Richland Hills and Hurst went to the flashing red/flashing yellow configuration after 10pm. Not sure if it still does. I remember the same thing occurring in Arlington late at night when I worked there and went to UTA in the mid-90s. Signals on Cooper and Collins would flash yellow and the cross streets flashed red. It definitely makes sense. Unnecessarily stopped cars spew out a lot of exhaust.

#36 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 28 April 2017 - 01:26 PM

Yep.  And traffic circles would make even more sense.


My blog: Doohickie

#37 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,119 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 28 April 2017 - 01:35 PM

Flashing yellow is also easier for cycling.

#38 Doohickie

Doohickie

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:76123

Posted 29 April 2017 - 09:50 PM

Depends.  If one street has flashing yellow, the other will have flashing red.  If you're trying to cross against the flashing red, cross traffic doesn't stop.


My blog: Doohickie

#39 johnfwd

johnfwd

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,918 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:southwest
  • Interests:Running, bicycling, bowling, nightclub life, science, technology.

Posted 01 May 2017 - 06:51 AM

I'm glad to see the city experimenting with these traffic-flow schemes at intersections.  With the four-way blinking reds, one of the confusing issues at the busy intersections involves motorists who are deciding when it's appropriate to make their turns against the oncoming vehicles.



#40 Austin55

Austin55

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,119 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tarrant

Posted 26 July 2017 - 02:59 PM

Photos from an accident in downtown which resulted in a 2 ton SUV sideways on the sidewalk...

 

https://twitter.com/...211283357892608



#41 JBB

JBB

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,438 posts
  • Location:Bedford

Posted 26 July 2017 - 03:34 PM

That driver was obviously going extremely fast with purpose.  Is there any traffic calming device short of a concrete bollard that could have prevented that?



#42 Electricron

Electricron

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 550 posts

Posted 27 July 2017 - 01:07 PM

A bollard isn't a traffic calming device, it's a traffic exclusion device. A guard rail could do the same job as a bollard - as far as preventing traffic on a sidewalk.
I don't know of any traffic calming device that prevents speeders and reckless drivers from turning their cars over on its side.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users