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What is this structure?


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#1 Brian Luenser

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:42 PM

As I am so frequently lost, I am starting a new section as an aid to asking for help in identifying a building or other structure.
Of course, if somebody doesn't nail it pretty quick, you are welcome to jump in with hunches or possibilities. I have my first victim on deck here. Have been wondering about this building for some time. I think because it is not necessarily in the central business district, it is not in any of my Downtown Historical books. I am guessing this is an historic building based on its apparent age (Older than my mother-in-law) and location (next to the railroad tracks as business used to do a century ago.)

OK, here we go... What is this structure? (I know it says King Candy on it, but doubt if that is what its main purpose was. Or antiques.)

60mm


400mm version


800mm version


Another 800mm version

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#2 cbellomy

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 06:57 PM

That's the King Candy Building, a 1922 Sanguinet & Staats structure with a 1947 addition by Wyatt Hedrick (if I'm reading the source material correctly). John has a "coming soon" tag associated with this building on his downtown page...

#3 Brian Luenser

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:35 PM

Thank you cbellomy for info on the King Candy Building. I am surprised that is what it is actually called. I assumed that it was a candy factory in the 80's or so. Would like any additional info on that building.

Here is my next candidate for identification. It is going to seem pretty predictable as it is in line (Just East) with the other two ID candidates. This is a really big structure that gives me no clues at all. I am guessing some kind of factory necessitating the rail service. I can't imagine what the need for that big ugly shed on top of the Northern building would have been with such large buildings. I admit I have never been over to this location. Could be if I would get it in gear I would find clues over there. But first, anybody have knowledge of these two related structures?


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#4 John T Roberts

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:45 PM

Cbellomy beat me to the reply on the King Candy Co., so I thought I would try to be the first on the next one. Those buildings are the last remaining structures that were a part of the Bewley Mills complex. The remaining buildings were just a small part of the grain, flour, and milling business on the east side of downtown. The sheds on top of the buildings are not original.

Below is a photograph of Bewley Mills taken when Spur 280 was under construction. You can see these buildings sitting off to the left of the main complex.


Jack White has a series of six photos relating to the Bewley Mills on this web site in his photo collection.

#5 Papaw

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:28 PM

My Uncle worked at King Candy in the 30's designing the artwork on the boxes they packaged their candy in. He once told me that they were one of the first candy companies that used coded dipping --- as each piece is dipped in chocolate it is hand manipulated as it is flipped over to form a certain design on the top with the last drippings of the chocolate so as to designate it's filling (whats inside). This was hard to learn but the ones that did it could duplicate their designs flawlessly and anyone that knew the design code could take a quick glance of any piece and know what was inside. This coding is still used today but I'm sure computer driven equipment does the curly cues on top. I can't remember when it closed but a lot of the employs went to Pangburns (sp ?).
The other interesting thing he spoke of was the policy that all candy companies have of helping yourself to all the candy you want while on the job. These were seconds (from when the dippers did screw up) and had large bins of every kind that they made. He said after the first or second day most employs didn't even want to see any more candy.

#6 Brian Luenser

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 06:58 AM

Great job John NAILING the Bewley Mills structures. I was never going to guess or find that info. In fact with the rest of the Mill gone even the old pics would not have really clued me in. A great pic by the way that Jack White has there. Had never seen it.

And thanks to Papaw for further info on the King Candy Co.. I really did not believe that huge structure was for making candy but sounds like it was just a very big candy making operation. As many times is the case, once you know the real story the clues seem more obvious. As I take additional looks at my pictures, some of the printing on the sides of the buildings that say King Candy look to be very old. Even 80 years old.

In both the mills building and King Candy building, it sure seems like there is so much cubic feet of structure that the building would have been in use to this time. I never quite understand building huge buildings when there are vacant huge buildings around.

In fact, why didn't TCC... Ah nevermind...
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#7 Bradleto

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 02:53 PM

I didn't check TAD.ORG to see who owns the building today, but a friend of my mother's bought the King Candy building in the mid 1980s, around that time anyway, as I recall. It was way out on the edge of "prosperity" at the time... I guess the city is growing toward it. If not, it is just a matter of time.

The owner is the ex-wife of a former Tandy executive. For a long time, I believe she either operated and/or leased out space for resale and antique shops housed within it, that sort of thing.

I recall going into the building just once back then and it was in rough shape. I suppose someone could renovate the structure... they done so with much less to work with, I am sure.

Brad

#8 Brian Luenser

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 12:47 PM

QUOTE (John T Roberts @ Jan 26 2009, 09:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Cbellomy beat me to the reply on the King Candy Co., so I thought I would try to be the first on the next one. Those buildings are the last remaining structures that were a part of the Bewley Mills complex. The remaining buildings were just a small part of the grain, flour, and milling business on the east side of downtown. The sheds on top of the buildings are not original.

Below is a photograph of Bewley Mills taken when Spur 280 was under construction. You can see these buildings sitting off to the left of the main complex.


Jack White has a series of six photos relating to the Bewley Mills on this web site in his photo collection.


This drawing of Bewley Mills is in my favorite Fort Worth book. (1949) I want them to put that huge neon sign back on the top of that remaining structure!

www.fortworthview.com

#9 Austin55

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Posted 13 December 2016 - 03:55 PM

Local architect Philip Newburn has posted some photos and captions of the Bewley Mills building on his Instagram while doing a feasibility study, it seems a tenant is interested in converting it to offices. 

 

https://www.instagra...urnarchitecture  

 

https://www.instagra...urnarchitecture



#10 JBB

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 03:08 PM

That's an interesting find. They would be on an island out there, but I would hope it would spur some development that direction.

#11 johnfwd

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:07 AM

Local architect Philip Newburn has posted some photos and captions of the Bewley Mills building on his Instagram while doing a feasibility study, it seems a tenant is interested in converting it to offices. 

 

https://www.instagra...urnarchitecture

 

https://www.instagra...urnarchitecture

Is that building structurally sound?  Seems like it'll take a lot of renovation work.



#12 JBB

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 12:28 PM

I think the point of the feasibility study is to answer questions like that.

#13 Urbndwlr

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 01:51 PM

I would guess the metal shed structure exists in part to keep water off the flat roof and parapet walls to preserve the structure. 

Not sure why its an entire floor of metal building though.

Access to those buildings is a little tricky.  Of course those things can change over time but presumably the reason they have been overlooked for so long is that they are quite disconnected from the Downtown grid.  (under/over RR tracks)



#14 johnfwd

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 07:47 AM

For lack of a more appropriate thread title, or maybe a view of this ostentatious abode begs the question.  When does a house look more like a suburban office building?  Mary Rogers is the author of the S-T article below, from the paper's Living section. 

 

http://www.star-tele...e142844404.html






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