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Arlington House and Farm


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#1 Brian Luenser

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 08:43 PM

My wife's Grandmother owns and lives on a farm in Arlington. This house was built in 1911. A bit older than your average Arlington house. Has piped gas lighting! Has a piped in gas iron for ironing. Upstairs undisturbed since the 30s. Clothes, coins etc, etc... from 1936. Just amazing. (Wife wants me to withhold location for safety reasons.) I will say this, however, they are a family of very good shots! (Uncle Ray threatens salesmen with a shotgun.) Outside of Uncle Ray, a real treat to visit. Her Grandmother is 97 and has lived there since 1930 when she married her farmer Grandfather (She lived in Arlingon before that.) She "donated" a hundred acres of her land to the Army for an air strip in WWII. (and was never returned) Would love to tell you lots more, but wife won't allow.
Her Grandmother's parents were from Arlington also. (Came by covered wagon from Tennessee in 1883) They owned a farm/ranch which is now I-20 and Cooper. Part of their ranch was were the Melear Post office is now, and part where the Parks Mall is. Her Grandmother had to pick cotton all day when she was young. If she didn't pick a required amount, her father would whip her. Nice guy.

BTW, it is obvious at least one type of salesman got past old uncle Ray. The lighting rod salesman. When I was on an aircraft carrier I was an Intelligence Specialist. (IS2) I would track what was supposed to look like shrimp boats but were packed with antenna's. (Russian AGI intelligence collectors.) Reminds me of this house. But they are indeed lightning rods. (She is still figuring out that crazy electric toaster oven.)


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#2 Cranky Greg

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 10:02 PM

I love the photo! I grew up in Arlington and lived there all through the 1970's and 80's, but now live out of state. I thought I knew all about Arlington......I am trying to figure out where this is.....maybe somewhere around Dalworthington Gardens to Lake Arlington area or Center Street north of Pioneer Parkway? It's killing me!!

#3 longhornz32

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 10:28 PM

I can understand your wife's concern. That home is a living museum with a treasure trove inside. Gas Iron??!!! I'd love to see that work. I am so incredibly jealous.

Just the building alone amazes me. I find it amusing sometimes all the energy put into so called new "Green Design". This home is a great example of how low tech design choices were just practical with the large overhang/porch that faces south and west and light colored roof.. How in the world did black roofs become popular in an area like ours? It just makes so much sense to have a white roof.

#4 Dismuke

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 12:35 AM

QUOTE (monee9696 @ Aug 31 2008, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Has piped gas lighting! Has a piped in gas iron for ironing.



Neat house and neat posting.

Does the gas lighting still work? If so, is it regular natural gas and, if so, has it always been so?

My grandparents' house in Kansas had acetylene gas lighting all the way up until the very late '40s or early '50s. Outside in the yard was a plant where water would slowly drip over carbide thus producing the gas that was piped into the house. When I was a kid, my grandfather let me have some of the old light fixtures he still had left over from when he converted the house to electricity. Acetylene was used for lighting prior to rural electrification and in areas where there were no natural gas lines. There were still a few rural areas that were not electrified until the 1950s.
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#5 Birdland in Handley

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 12:42 AM

WOW. That's got to be in the top 5 nicest houses in Arlington. Maybe in the the top 2 of houses that are still residences (guess the Waples places is still a residence). And quite a bit older than the Waples place. Could this be the oldest house in Arlington? Though I live on the east side I know very little about Arlington. When we first moved to the east side we got lit. from the Arlington Visitor's Bureau and none of it mentioned Historic interests except the Fielder Museum.
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#6 Brian Luenser

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 05:49 AM

QUOTE (Dismuke @ Sep 1 2008, 01:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (monee9696 @ Aug 31 2008, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Has piped gas lighting! Has a piped in gas iron for ironing.



Neat house and neat posting.

Does the gas lighting still work? If so, is it regular natural gas and, if so, has it always been so?

My grandparents' house in Kansas had acetylene gas lighting all the way up until the very late '40s or early '50s. Outside in the yard was a plant where water would slowly drip over carbide thus producing the gas that was piped into the house. When I was a kid, my grandfather let me have some of the old light fixtures he still had left over from when he converted the house to electricity. Acetylene was used for lighting prior to rural electrification and in areas where there were no natural gas lines. There were still a few rural areas that were not electrified until the 1950s.


No natural gas here. Couldn't think of the name for it but you did. Carbide gas. Sure enough, there is an underground tank of some sort in the back yard that produced the gas. Don't know if it would still work but nothing was removed. (Note to self... ask WalMart employee where to find the Carbide pellets.)

The upstairs of this place was for farm hands. A couple of bedrooms. Family took over upstairs eventually and moved on. (In 1936 obviously). I remember seeing a receipt to Luke Pontiac in Arlington for an oil change. 1936. School year books. 1933. A large bell to call the farm hands to dinner. Tons of antiques of course. But what I hear, if the stuff wasn't good stuff back when, likely not valuable now. They were pretty poor farmers and they figure most of the stuff is junk. That would be my guess. But total time travel going up there. (I should do a digital clip to post.)

My wifes grandmother has 100% of her mind at 97. Great sense of humor and in pretty good shape. Very good health. Perfect hearing. Thick glasses but reads the Star Telegram each day. I just bought her a 42" LCD HDTV at Target because she stressed so about the old fashion signals going away next year. She watches a lot of TV. Believe this, she has an OLDER SISTER that lives by herself in Arlington also (Up town). 100 years old. Listens to police radio day and night. Talks non-stop about the Dallas Cowboys. Never misses a game on TV.
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#7 Dismuke

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 12:53 PM

QUOTE (monee9696 @ Sep 1 2008, 06:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Tons of antiques of course. But what I hear, if the stuff wasn't good stuff back when, likely not valuable now. They were pretty poor farmers and they figure most of the stuff is junk. That would be my guess.


That may be true in some instances - but I wouldn't put a great deal of stock in that notion.

Ultimately, price value of such things is determined by supply and demand under today's conditions - not by circumstances back then. People tend to take better care of things they perceive as "good stuff" so such items tend to survive in decent condition in larger quantities. Likewise, people tend to not take as good care of items that they consider to be commonplace, cheap or disposable and they tend to be thrown away rather quickly. Both factors have an influence on today's supply. Whatever that supply may be, whether anybody is interested in it is an entirely different story and also part of the equation.

It is certainly true with old records, the one area I know most about. The most valuable old records tend to be those sold, often by mail order, to poor rural blacks in the 1920s and early 1930s. Even low-priced records were considered a luxury item for this market and the records they did own, they tended to enjoy them over and over again using the wind-up players of the era with the steel needles which were harsh on records. When the Depression hit, many people could not afford to buy the steel needles which needed to be changed out after each and every record was played. So many people reused the needles many many times imposing significant groove damage on the records with every play. Today, when such records turn up, they are almost always in terrible condition and when they do turn up in decent condition, they are often worth a great deal of money. By contrast, the Victor Red Seal classical and opera records from the 1900s to 1920s were considered to be a premium product and they were priced accordingly. Not only were they purchased by genuine classical music and opera fans, they were also purchased in large numbers by affluent women eager to demonstrate to guests and neighbors how "cultured" their families were. The records were only occasionally played and carefully stored away in expensive storage albums and were regarded in the same way as were expensive books and subscriptions to National Geographic: heirlooms to be passed down to the next generation. When the scrap drives of World War II came along and people had to turn in an old record in order to buy a new one because of shortages of the shellac from which they were made - well, they weren't going to get grandma's Red Seals that she paid dearly for back in the day. Today, old Red Seals turn up all the time and almost always in very decent condition. There are some people who collect them - but not many. As a result, the vast majority of issues only have minimal monetary value.

I suspect the same factors hold true for a number of other areas of collector interest as well. I certainly wouldn't write off and discard any of it as "junk" without doing a bit of research. Even things such as the receipt for the oil change will sell on ebay, especially if you can bring the auction to the attention of local history types. Something like that won't go for a lot of money - but it will definitely fetch at least a few dollars. And if you just happen into a situation where two people both want it badly enough, you might be surprised at how much it will go for. Unfortunately, I am one of those crazy people who would much rather hang on and keep neat stuff like that then sell it.



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#8 Dismuke

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 01:14 PM

Here is an interesting article that describes a bit what carbide lighting was like:

http://www.istockana...id_2502015.html

My father remembers living in the house between the time my grandparents moved in and my grandfather converted everything over to electricity. He said the light it provided was of nice quality and one could see just as well as with electric lighting.

I THINK they also made refrigerators that could run on carbide. I know that they made (and still do, I believe) refrigerators that ran on propane and natural gas. One advantage of such refrigerators I am told is they are silent.
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#9 Brian Luenser

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 01:27 PM

And if I may be greedy with my bandwidth...

In Grandma's back yard is this windmill, which filled this concrete trough with pumped water. This was to water the animals. (I think horses, but I forget.)

They made many attempts through the decades to get rid of this concrete trough that is in the way. As it turns out, it is where the word "Permanent" was originated. Many rounds of dynamite and other explosives could not do the job. The last attempt to get rid of it was in 1962 with "Enough dynamite to level a city." As you can see, it damaged it a bit is all. When I first went to this farm in 1981 I told them I would be back with a sludge hammer to take care of this for them. They are still laughing at me. (I had never seen concrete that was not phased by a big sludge hammer.) Now that the old farm is surrounded by "Stuff" it is too late to bring out more explosives. I think grandma is finally OK with it anyway.

And Dismuke, interesting thoughts on antiques of lower quality items not surviving. Sure could be the case here. I sure am going to take interior pics just for a quick view of old stuff.

Again, the more pics of the farm I show, the more likely one of our Forum members will recognize this place. (But let's keep it a secret by my wife's request... thanks.)

Pictures taken yesterday


Watering Trough that will always be there.


Old Homestead, Front

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#10 Dismuke

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 03:09 PM

I'll bet that the windmill at one time was also set up to provide water to the house - most likely just the kitchen. That's the way it was with my grandparents' house. The windmill was located just behind the house and provided running water to the kitchen. The house originally had a bathroom with a tub in it but no toilet or sink. Not sure if the tub was ever hooked up to the windmill water or if they had to bring water to it manually. They had an out house in the backyard which I remember still being there when I was a small child. The bathroom also had a trap door that led to the basement where there was a chemical toilet that was used when the weather was too cold to use the outhouse. With electricity, my grandfather was able to replace the windmill with an electric well pump and then plumbed the house with what is essentially a modern plumbing system. Eventually, the windmill tower was converted into a base for their television antenna. High television antennas were important because the nearest stations were over 100 miles away.

I'll bet your wife's grandma has lots of fascinating stories to tell. Ever thought about asking her to talk about some of them with a tape and/or digital recorder present? My grandfather had lots of interesting stories - but he froze up and became self-conscious in the presence of a tape recorder.
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#11 cbellomy

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 05:00 PM

QUOTE (Dismuke @ Sep 1 2008, 04:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'll bet that the windmill at one time was also set up to provide water to the house - most likely just the kitchen. That's the way it was with my grandparents' house.


That's how it was at my house growing up, at least until my parents moved out in 1988. That was on Heron Drive on Lake Worth.

I understand they have city water now, with sewer in process.


#12 djold1

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 08:01 PM

QUOTE
I'll bet that the windmill at one time was also set up to provide water to the house - most likely just the kitchen


A minor point:

Most likely the windmill near the house pumped to an elevated covered tank made of wood or maybe steel with the bottom of the tank being a little bit higher than the eaves of the house unless they wanted water on the 2nd floor (if any). Many people preferred a covered wooden tank made of staves because it did not give a metallic taste to the water. Cypress staves were often used because they would not rot.

That way, by creating an elevated "head", pressure was always in the water line. A windmill didn't turn or pump all the time and would be set to stop pumping when a float on the storage tank was tripped or the wind was too high. Earlier, many kitchens had a hand pump near the draining board that was connected directly to the well or underground cistern and water could be hand pumped into a basin, etc. I can remember seeing both of these in some houses when I was a small boy in Missouri.

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#13 cbellomy

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 08:36 PM

QUOTE (djold1 @ Sep 1 2008, 09:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
I'll bet that the windmill at one time was also set up to provide water to the house - most likely just the kitchen


A minor point:

Most likely the windmill near the house pumped to an elevated covered tank made of wood or maybe steel with the bottom of the tank being a little bit higher than the eaves of the house unless they wanted water on the 2nd floor (if any). Many people preferred a covered wooden tank made of staves because it did not give a metallic taste to the water. Cypress staves were often used because they would not rot.

That way, by creating an elevated "head", pressure was always in the water line. A windmill didn't turn or pump all the time and would be set to stop pumping when a float on the storage tank was tripped or the wind was too high. Earlier, many kitchens had a hand pump near the draining board that was connected directly to the well or underground cistern and water could be hand pumped into a basin, etc. I can remember seeing both of these in some houses when I was a small boy in Missouri.

FWIW


Yes, that's correct. Our wellhouse was on a hill above our house, with the tank on the second story. (It was made of concrete, though.) Water flowed into the house by gravity and nothing else.


#14 Brian Luenser

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 09:14 PM

QUOTE (cbellomy @ Sep 1 2008, 09:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (djold1 @ Sep 1 2008, 09:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
I'll bet that the windmill at one time was also set up to provide water to the house - most likely just the kitchen


A minor point:

Most likely the windmill near the house pumped to an elevated covered tank made of wood or maybe steel with the bottom of the tank being a little bit higher than the eaves of the house unless they wanted water on the 2nd floor (if any). Many people preferred a covered wooden tank made of staves because it did not give a metallic taste to the water. Cypress staves were often used because they would not rot.

That way, by creating an elevated "head", pressure was always in the water line. A windmill didn't turn or pump all the time and would be set to stop pumping when a float on the storage tank was tripped or the wind was too high. Earlier, many kitchens had a hand pump near the draining board that was connected directly to the well or underground cistern and water could be hand pumped into a basin, etc. I can remember seeing both of these in some houses when I was a small boy in Missouri.

FWIW


Yes, that's correct. Our wellhouse was on a hill above our house, with the tank on the second story. (It was made of concrete, though.) Water flowed into the house by gravity and nothing else.


I'll promise you that modern man would die of thirst before, A. They devised such a system, and B. They put away their credit cards and cell phones and manned shovels and wheel barrows.

I had a woman in my office complaining loudly all Friday morning about $1,100. in car repairs she could not afford. After a couple hours of lost productivity I started wondering if I should lend her some money or advise. As I inquired about the necessary repair details I find out that it is a compressor and evaporator. Air conditioning. I told her, in front of lots of her co-workers, that A/C was not actually critical to the operation of that car and that it has only been common in cars for 25 years. The place fell silent. They waited for this old fart to get back into his office for them to laugh loudly. I could not hear the rest of their conversation but bet it went something like, "Welcome to the 21st Century pops..."
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#15 Dismuke

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 09:51 PM

QUOTE (monee9696 @ Sep 1 2008, 10:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I had a woman in my office complaining loudly all Friday morning about $1,100. in car repairs she could not afford. After a couple hours of lost productivity I started wondering if I should lend her some money or advise. As I inquired about the necessary repair details I find out that it is a compressor and evaporator. Air conditioning. I told her, in front of lots of her co-workers, that A/C was not actually critical to the operation of that car and that it has only been common in cars for 25 years. The place fell silent. They waited for this old fart to get back into his office for them to laugh loudly. I could not here the rest of their conversation but bet it went something like, "Welcome to the 21st Century pops..."



I found myself in the exact same role as you a few times at the company I used to work for a few years back. The people who reported to me would periodically come to me moaning and groaning that the climate control was either too hot or too cold - and it was not uncommon to receive both complaints simultaneously. There was little I could do about it as all thermostats were locked and set by some facilities person and one had to go through a stubborn bureaucracy to get them changed. And even if I could change things, I probably would never have admitted that I could - no matter what temperature a thermostat is set at there will be people who will think it is too high and too low.

One day after a couple of people approached me with a bit of whining that I found to be more melodramatic than I had the stomach for, I scolded back: "You know, there was a time when people just like you and me crossed this continent on horseback and in bumpy covered wagons. They did so in the scorching heat with the sun beating down on them and they did so in the rain with a stiff, cold northern wind blowing on them. They had to deal with mosquitoes and every so often they would ride into hornets' and bumble bee nests. And they had to worry about angry Indians who wanted to chop their heads off. Imagine what those people would think if they could hear you complaining about the hardships you are enduring because your air conditioned office is three degrees warmer than you would like it."

The response I got was probably predictable: a couple of blank looks of disgust with one of them muttering something about "well that was then and this is now."



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#16 Sailor

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 01:44 PM

QUOTE (monee9696 @ Aug 31 2008, 09:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My wife's Grandmother owns and lives on a farm in Arlington. This house was built in 1911. A bit older than your average Arlington house. Has piped gas lighting! Has a piped in gas iron for ironing. Upstairs undisturbed since the 30s. Clothes, coins etc, etc... from 1936. Just amazing. (Wife wants me to withhold location for safety reasons.) I will say this, however, they are a family of very good shots! (Uncle Ray threatens salesmen with a shotgun.) Outside of Uncle Ray, a real treat to visit. Her Grandmother is 97 and has lived there since 1930 when she married her farmer Grandfather (She lived in Arlingon before that.) She "donated" a hundred acres of her land to the Army for an air strip in WWII. (and was never returned) Would love to tell you lots more, but wife won't allow.
Her Grandmother's parents were from Arlington also. (Came by covered wagon from Tennessee in 1883) They owned a farm/ranch which is now I-20 and Cooper. Part of their ranch was were the Melear Post office is now, and part where the Parks Mall is. Her Grandmother had to pick cotton all day when she was young. If she didn't pick a required amount, her father would whip her. Nice guy.

BTW, it is obvious at least one type of salesman got past old uncle Ray. The lighting rod salesman. When I was on an aircraft carrier I was an Intelligence Specialist. (IS2) I would track what was supposed to look like shrimp boats but were packed with antenna's. (Russian AGI intelligence collectors.) Reminds me of this house. But they are indeed lightning rods. (She is still figuring out that crazy electric toaster oven.)




Great picture! I cannot place the location. I have been in Arlington since 1952 and believe me there used to be more of those houses before they leveled everything in the area. I would think it might be north of Division in that older area. I hope Arlington realizes soon, what they have allowed to happen with the city's history. Especially before the name changes to "Jerry World"......


#17 Brian Luenser

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Posted 28 November 2008 - 02:32 PM

Went to the Arlington Farm for Thanksgiving dinner. (Farm has been in wifes family for like 120 years)
Ya gotta love sweet potato pie!

Here are some pictures I took. It was drizzling out so don't look for any pretty skies, but fun pics anyway.

As I have 11 pictures I would like to show, I made a little slide show. Click the link and take a look...

Mostly self explanatory, but I add these comments:

The old rusty trailer is a logging trailer. (For bringing trees to town to sell). On its final trip (70 years ago is a guess) it was parked in the field. As they could not mow around it, it created a "starter forest". A tree grew through one of the wheels. (see closeup pic)
It was like trees getting revenge for cutting them down and selling them.

There are shots of an old Willys Jeep in a shed as well as an old Dodge Farm truck.

There are pictures of their silos. (1925) as well as a tree that is growing inside one now... VERY Slowly as you can imagine as it gets an hour or two of sun a day. Here is the slide show link... Take a look! (Click the button in lower right corner to fill screen!) Then escape to exit.

http://flickr.com/ph...352524836/show/
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#18 cajunmike

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Posted 28 November 2008 - 06:33 PM

I enjoy seeing old photos of farm houses, barns etc. Thanks for sharing.
Mike

#19 mbdalton1

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 03:08 PM

I know exactly where this farm house is! It is beautiful and I bet it was even more so back when it was brand new.

I grew up in Mansfield and when I was younger there used to be a huge amount of prairie land that separated us from Arlington. When we'd take the 'country roads' to go Six Flags Mall, we'd see this house out in the middle of the prairie, and from a distance it looked like it was up on a hill. A grand old dame!

I still live in Mansfield and now when I travel some of what is left of the old 'country roads' into Arlington, all the prairie is eaten up by tract home subdivisions. (you can see some of this in one of the photos in the slide show link). So sad! The home is still there obviously but now looks so small compared to what it used to.

So fun to hear some stories about this house! I always wonder about such things! I'm a romantic like that!

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#20 gdvanc

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 12:24 AM

I thought that house looked familiar!

I'm not sure I'd say I've entirely grown up, but a lot of whatever growing up I've done was in Mansfield. Drove those roads. Goat lady. "Sharp Uphl." Lots of nice padding between "Good Ol' Mansfield High" and A-town. A lot of that's gone. I went back to my 20-year reunion several years ago and driving down Matlock to the Nutt House you couldn't tell where Arlington stopped and Mansfield started. Dad still lives out near the "S-curve" on East Broad (we had to jog out there in Junior High); I went the back roads from there once and had trouble remembering where some of them were. Man has that town changed.

Further off topic: my (former) junior high science teacher now teaches my kids at our little parochial school in Arlington. Small world.

#21 Brian Luenser

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:41 PM

I guess the pictures I originally posted of this farm got deleted due to inactivity. Dangit.

Went out to the farm today. They drilled 4 gas wells (and are about to drill 5 more) out there over a year ago but did not have the gas lines installed to take the gas away. You may have read 2 weeks ago that a farm in Arlington has the mother of all gas wells. (Titled Arlington well is a MONSTER) That well is 2 farms over. Turns out that where Mamo's farm is ground zero for major natural gas. They have been working around the clock to get gas pipes to those wells. They were going to bring in one large pipe but now have decided they need 2. They have it easy on Grandma's farm as the family owns 100% of the minerals and have since 1894. She only got $300. an acre as a signing bonus (on a couple hundred acres) but is about to get 28% of the gas coming out. Looks to be huge. Stand by. BTW before you ask me for a loan, know this family has always giving really everything they have ever had to charity. Mostly their church. I doubt this will be any different. You will know if all the sudden you see a church in Arlington that puts St.Peter's in Rome to shame.

I will post a few pics similar to a year ago as long as they got dropped. (By Picoodle.)












My Smith & Wesson is all I had for scale to show the size of these pipes.

www.fortworthview.com

#22 Cowtown Mike

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 09:09 PM

1. I hope they get a lot of $$$ out of the wells. Great for them to be able to give to chairity, we need more people like that.
2. Looks like your S&W is an Airweight...model 642?
3. That is some serious pipeline

#23 Brian Luenser

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 09:38 PM

QUOTE (Cowtown Mike @ Jan 24 2010, 09:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
1. I hope they get a lot of $$$ out of the wells. Great for them to be able to give to chairity, we need more people like that.
2. Looks like your S&W is an Airweight...model 642?
3. That is some serious pipeline



Cripes. Airweight 642 is correct. You are good! (Many similar models.) Yep. Has the built in laser.
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