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Does anyone have knowledge of the Texan


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#1 WESTHMESS

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 11:10 PM

In a booklet from Frank Kent Cadillac it was stated that The Texan was produced from 1918 'til 1922. Any comments, facts, information? I've lived in Ft. Worth most of my life (born here, raised here) and had never heard of the Texan before reading about it.
Wes

#2 RD Milhollin

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 10:37 PM

QUOTE(WESTHMESS @ Dec 18 2006, 01:10 AM) View Post

In a booklet from Frank Kent Cadillac it was stated that The Texan was produced from 1918 'til 1922. Any comments, facts, information? I've lived in Ft. Worth most of my life (born here, raised here) and had never heard of the Texan before reading about it.
Wes


from: http://www.scripophi...emocaras19.html

In 1917 two brothers, James C. and Will H. Vernor, started the Texas Motor Car Association in Dallas with two hundred dollars in capital. They built an automobile factory south of Fort Worth on the bare prairie that would someday be the 3600 block of McCart. The company had big plans to produce a luxury car and an oilfield truck. The city of Fort Worth planned to extend a streetcar line south along the old Cleburne Road for the convenience of factory workers.

But the company's life was brief. By 1922 the company had ceased production, hurt by a factory fire, the post-World War I flu epidemic, drought, and competition from cars such as the Ford Model T. Only about two thousand Texan cars and one thousand Texan trucks were built. The car sold for one thousand dollars, had a thirty-five-horsepower engine, thirty-three-inch tires, a wooden dashboard, and a rumble seat. Decades later the Texan auto factory was bought by Martin Sprocket and Gear company.

The Texan automobile was built by the Texas Motor Car Association of Fort Worth was designed specifically for Texas roads and weather. The oversized tires, powerful four-cylinder engine, and extra-wide roof for shade gave it special features for the Texas market.

photos of the touring car here: http://www.trombinos.../texan2001.html

#3 WESTHMESS

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 09:31 PM

QUOTE(Prairie Pup @ Dec 18 2006, 10:37 PM) View Post

QUOTE(WESTHMESS @ Dec 18 2006, 01:10 AM) View Post

In a booklet from Frank Kent Cadillac it was stated that The Texan was produced from 1918 'til 1922. Any comments, facts, information? I've lived in Ft. Worth most of my life (born here, raised here) and had never heard of the Texan before reading about it.
Wes


from: http://www.scripophi...emocaras19.html

In 1917 two brothers, James C. and Will H. Vernor, started the Texas Motor Car Association in Dallas with two hundred dollars in capital. They built an automobile factory south of Fort Worth on the bare prairie that would someday be the 3600 block of McCart. The company had big plans to produce a luxury car and an oilfield truck. The city of Fort Worth planned to extend a streetcar line south along the old Cleburne Road for the convenience of factory workers.

But the company's life was brief. By 1922 the company had ceased production, hurt by a factory fire, the post-World War I flu epidemic, drought, and competition from cars such as the Ford Model T. Only about two thousand Texan cars and one thousand Texan trucks were built. The car sold for one thousand dollars, had a thirty-five-horsepower engine, thirty-three-inch tires, a wooden dashboard, and a rumble seat. Decades later the Texan auto factory was bought by Martin Sprocket and Gear company.

The Texan automobile was built by the Texas Motor Car Association of Fort Worth was designed specifically for Texas roads and weather. The oversized tires, powerful four-cylinder engine, and extra-wide roof for shade gave it special features for the Texas market.

photos of the touring car here: http://www.trombinos.../texan2001.html


That's very interesting. I wonder why there was nothing about this in any of the Ft. Worth history that I've seen? I became interested in Ft. Worth history after Dad died and I inherited my Mother's postcard collection. I find it strange that I've never seen a postcard of the Texan plant or of Hell's Half Acre. May I ask where you got your information? I'd like to know more about the Texan plant and Hell's Half Acre. I've only begun my interest in Ft. Worth history so I know very little at this time.
Thanks for the information. It's appreciated.
Wes









#4 Giraffe

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 09:12 PM

The automotive writer Tom McCahill was published in _Mechanix Illustrated_ magazine from the 1950s until his death in the 1970s. He had a great Q&A column in the magazine called "Mail for McCahill." In the February 1967 issue, someone wrote to ask him about the history of an old car called a "Texan." McCahill responded in print:

"The Texan was built by the Texas Motor Car Association, Ft. Worth, Tex., between the years 1918 and 1922. It was a 4-cylinder rig... The engine was supplied by Lycoming, which built engines for several manufacturers at the same time."

McCahill provided no further details or photographs of this car, so I have no idea what it looked like or where the factory could have been. Anyone here have more data?

#5 RD Milhollin

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 09:25 PM

Try this link to another thread of the Fort Worth Forum

http://www.fortworth...?showtopic=2016

#6 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 09:46 PM

Seems like the Pate Museum had one. No telling where it is now.

#7 David Love

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 10:18 PM

Will get around to merging it...

Better Business Bureau:  A place to find or post valid complaints for auto delerships and maintenance facilities. (New Features) If you have a valid gripe about auto dealerships, this is the place to voice it.


#8 RicknTX

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 02:14 PM

This link might help...

http://www.scripophi...emocaras19.html



The automotive writer Tom McCahill was published in _Mechanix Illustrated_ magazine from the 1950s until his death in the 1970s. He had a great Q&A column in the magazine called "Mail for McCahill." In the February 1967 issue, someone wrote to ask him about the history of an old car called a "Texan." McCahill responded in print:

"The Texan was built by the Texas Motor Car Association, Ft. Worth, Tex., between the years 1918 and 1922. It was a 4-cylinder rig... The engine was supplied by Lycoming, which built engines for several manufacturers at the same time."

McCahill provided no further details or photographs of this car, so I have no idea what it looked like or where the factory could have been. Anyone here have more data?



#9 John T Roberts

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 08:22 PM

The threads have been merged. The building where the Texan was built is still standing and it has a listing in fortwortharchitecture.com. Here's the link: http://www.fortworth...outh/martin.htm. It is currently occupied by Martin Sprocket and Gear.

#10 FortWorthLowrider

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:46 AM

Great info
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#11 Giraffe

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 09:51 PM

Thanks to everyone for the updates! Sorry I didn't do more research within first. I've gone by that building hundreds of times without knowing its history. I drove by it just this morning (on Granbury Road, anyway) and got to see it in a whole new light. I wonder if the folks who built it decades ago had any idea that it would still be used in the following century? (It does stand out from the surrounding architecture, for sure.)

#12 CamilleCook

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:45 PM

My grandfather was an officer in this company - Carlos Frank Sanders.  My family is looking for a museum where a Texan might be on display.  Does anyone know of such a museum? 






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