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Where did the "Arlington" in Arlington Heights come from?


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#1 mmiller2002

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 04:12 PM

I know the original name is Chamberlin Arlington Heights. Chamberlin came from the developers.

Just curious.

#2 AndyN

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 05:31 PM

If I had to guess, I would suggest that it might be named after General Lee's family mansion/estate near Washington DC. If you think about the sentiments in Fort Worth at the time this area was developed, Confederate themes were popular and Fort Worth area had no shortage of old Confederates. Of course, I'm just guessing.
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#3 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 08:08 PM

I always assumed it was named after Arlington Heights, Illinois.

#4 RogerH

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Posted 20 August 2006 - 05:19 PM

Like Ghost Writer, I've always assumed it was named after Arlington Heights, IL as well. I believe the landscape architects that developed the plans for subdivisions such as Park Hill and Monticello were from Chicago, so to me, the Illinois connection made sense.


#5 safly

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 06:35 PM

Wait a minute here. I've been to AH in IL many many many times. And in NO WAY does this AH resemble that AH. Besides, the IL AH is only how many decades established???

Wait just checked and it was incorporated back in 1836, why I didn't remember is beyond me. Ted NUGENT was from there and LHO was from this one. NEATO.

Speaking of landscaping. Has anyone here ever heard of HISTORICALLY ACCURATE landscaping?? Or landscape preservation Are there any records to support this?
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#6 Ghost Writer in Disguise

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 07:08 PM

QUOTE(safly @ Aug 21 2006, 07:35 PM) View Post

Wait a minute here. I've been to AH in IL many many many times. And in NO WAY does this AH resemble that AH. Besides, the IL AH is only how many decades established???


Non sequitur. Does Brooklyn Heights FW resemble Brooklyn Heights NY? Or Dublin TX resemble Dublin Ireland?

#7 Buck

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 08:30 PM

There was a turn-of-the-century hotel at Merrick and Byers named the Arlington Inn --

Maybe some historian out there knows: Was the Arlington Inn there before Arlington Heights, and is that the source?

I seem to recall that the first Arlington Heights school opened about 1896, and it was off Merrick at Pershing, I think.

#8 Buck

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 08:54 PM

OK, my mistake -- looks like the Chamberlin land developers started both the neighborhood and hotel at the same time.

The hotel opened July 9, 1892--




#9 AndyN

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 10:47 PM

I'm still researching. I did a lot of work there a few years back and ran across a biography of the developer, Chamberlin. Off the top of my head I recall he was British and died bankrupt, but let me find the bio before I commit to that. I thought he was based in Denver or had another development there, too. I can't find anything and I've stayed up way too late looking for information.

Also, I read somewhere that Arlington Heights was not the original name of the city in Illinois purported to be the source. Can't figure out what year the name changed, though.

Somewhere I have a copy of the subdivision plat. Nice script work. 1890s vintage.
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#10 RogerH

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 09:18 PM

QUOTE(AndyN @ Aug 21 2006, 11:47 PM) View Post

Somewhere I have a copy of the subdivision plat. Nice script work. 1890s vintage.
Andy is correct on the date, the plat for Chamberlin Arlington Heights First Addition was executed in December of 1890.

The first developer appears to have been, "the American Land and Investment Co." The plat was signed in Tarrant County, so there is no indication of any type of Illinois connection there. The president of the American Land and Investment Co. appears to be, "H. W. Fallant" though I'm not 100% sure I'm reading the old script correctly.



#11 AndyN

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 11:32 PM

Thanks RogerH. I was going to mention that my copy is from the Tarrant County Clerk's Plat Records and is not a great copy. I don't know if they have an original in their warehouse, but if someone needed a copy of any quality, that's where I would check.
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#12 safly

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 02:02 PM

QUOTE(Ghost Writer in Disguise @ Aug 21 2006, 08:08 PM) View Post

QUOTE(safly @ Aug 21 2006, 07:35 PM) View Post

Wait a minute here. I've been to AH in IL many many many times. And in NO WAY does this AH resemble that AH. Besides, the IL AH is only how many decades established???


Non sequitur. Does Brooklyn Heights FW resemble Brooklyn Heights NY? Or Dublin TX resemble Dublin Ireland?


Of course not. But your remarks where that there was some IL connection in regards to a developer. Developers most likely do not get the nod to develop a piece of land about 1500 miles away from their base to just put something so OUT of line in what they may be known for. I'm assuming here.

Hence AH in FW looks nothing like AH in IL. That's all I was saying to dispute the CONNECTION there. I did not look at the platting and so forth, which would present better support in why or how AH in FW came about. Sorry to confuse you and others.
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#13 FW_brownfields

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 09:03 AM

Although this doesn't answer the question "where does the Arlington in Arlington Heights come from" it is an interesting bit from an article that makes Fort Worth sound like a utopia. You can find this article on the Library of Congress web site:


"The New South - The City of Fort Worth" [The New England magazine / Volume 11, Issue 4, December 1891]

The residence suburbs of Fort Worth are very attractive. Arlington Heights, located west of the city, begins about 1 1/2 miles from the business centre, and extends about 1 mile further. It is 150 feet higher than the city itself, and about 200 feet above the Clear Fork River, which sweeps its eastern border. The Chamberlin Investment Company, a wealthy corporation, has already expended nearly $500,000 in the work of improving and beautifying the Heights; and is not done yet. About 12 miles of streets have been graded and gravelled, and a fine boulevard, 3 miles in length, 125 feet wide with a triple row of trees along it, is the fashionable driveway. Completed water-mains, with hydrants attached, are laid throughout the tract.

A large electric plant, capable of supplying all needs of the future, has been in operation for some time, furnishing the illumination of the Heights, and also the requisite current for the rapid transit, electric railway that connects the Heights with the business centre of the city. Artesian wells have been sunk, and an abundance of pure water secured. A pumping-house conveys the water to a large elevated reservoir, standing on the crest of the Heights 100 feet above the ground, and having a capacity of 110,000 gallons. In the centre of the grounds is an artificial body of water, covering forty acres of land,
known as Lake Como. The lake and surrounding shores are lighted by sparkling electric lamps, and pleasure-seekers assemble here every evening to listen to good music, while over the lakes smooth surface are scattered pretty boats, each with its colored lantern, that rocks and swings to the rhythm of the music. The beauty of a southern summer night must be seen and heard to be appreciated. Southerners are devoted to sweet sounds and pleasing colors, and enter into the enjoyment of an affair like this with an abandon that is a stranger to colder climes. The Heights bid fair to become the aristocratic portion, not only of Fort Worth, but also of a very large share of Tarrant county. A number of high-class residences already occupy desirable sites, and many others are in process of construction. A one hundred thousand dollar hotel is projected.

#14 FW_brownfields

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 09:17 AM

I meant to add the URL. GO to this page on the LOC web http://memory.loc.go...newe_V11I4.html and scroll down to the bottom to find the article. I recommend you read it in page view from the Cornell University web because these are scans of the original article.

#15 safly

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 10:09 AM

WOW!

Very interesting read. So where is this Natatorium they write about? I'm all about the Turkish bath, would feel nice right about now.

Like how the writer directed his thoughts in closing.

"From a condition of vicious prejudice, the RANK GROWTH of unnatural practices, the South....."

??? dry.gif
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#16 John T Roberts

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 10:42 AM

The Natatorium was located on the southwest corner of 3rd and Rusk (now Commerce). The parking lot just to the north of the Flying Saucer was the building's location. This is the same piece of property that is holding up the construction of the public plaza in Sundance Square. I don't have a demolition date, but it was gone by 1950, according to the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps. At that time, the rest of the block was intact.

#17 FW_brownfields

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 12:29 PM

"Fort Worth - Outpost on the Trinity", page 199:

This source says that H.B. Chamberlain, a "wealthy Denver suburban real-estate man," was the promoter of Arlington Heights. He had purchased 2,000 acres of land for the development from Tom Hurley, a Chicago financier. It says that Chamberlain was president of the world YMCA and sold many of the lots abroad. He was killed in a collision while riding his bicycle in London in the fog.

#18 FW_brownfields

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 01:12 PM

Other Places Named Arlington Heights



Encyclopedia of Chicago web site says that in 1853 William Dunton persuaded the Illinois & Wisconsin Railroad to make a stop, and laid out a town called Dunton. It incorporated as Arlington Heights [Illinois] in 1887, when its population was approximately 1,000.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Fort Myer web site: "The acres encompassing Fort Myer and Arlington National Cemetery were called Arlington Heights when they were owned in the 1800s by Mary Anna Randolph, granddaughter of George Washington Parke Custis. Custis was Martha Washington's grandson. Mary Anna Randolph married Robert E. Lee when he was a young Army lieutenant. Lee helped rescue the estate from financial disaster in 1858, left the area in April 1861 to lead the Confederate Army, never to return. The land was confiscated by the government for military purposes when the Lees were unable to pay their property taxes in person. Part of the estate became Arlington National Cemetery...."


#19 safly

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 10:22 PM

I believe Dunton Rd. or Dunton Pass still exists today in AH. Maybe it's Dundee Rd.???

Actually, it may be Dunron Rd. I may remember that because it was similiar to Denton.
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#20 Keller Pirate

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 10:52 AM

QUOTE(safly @ Sep 5 2006, 11:22 PM) View Post

I believe Dunton Rd. or Dunton Pass still exists today in AH. Maybe it's Dundee Rd.???

Actually, it may be Dunron Rd. I may remember that because it was similiar to Denton.

Safly, you forced me to pull my Chicagoland street map off the shelf. You must be thinking of Dundee Rd. in Arlington Heights. The other main drags are Rand Rd, Golf Rd, Algonquin Rd and Northwest Highway. There is a Dunton neighborhood and Dunton Ave but it is not a main artery.

It is interesting that there Arlington's in 19 states and only one Arlington Heights, in IL as an incorporated city. California does not show an Arlington even though it once existed. That area was incorporated into the city of Riverside. My father used to sell his oranges to the Arlington Heights packing house.




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