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Redeveloping The Masonic Home Property


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#1 cjyoung

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:47 PM

Masonic Home site to get redeveloped

By SANDRA BAKER
STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER

FORT WORTH -- A Fort Worth real-estate developer, the Mallick Group, confirmed Monday that it is under contract to buy the 200-acre Masonic Home and School site on the city’s southeast side and has plans to develop the property with about 500 houses and some shopping centers.

The land, bounded by Wichita and East Berry streets and Mitchell Boulevard, is one of the largest contiguous land tracts in the inner city, said group Chairman Michel Mallick.

Mallick said his plan calls for preserving the 19 acres that hold most of the historic Masonic structures, building houses on 107 acres behind those buildings and setting aside about 63 acres along Berry Street for commercial use.

“This is going to change the makeup of southeast Fort Worth,” Mallick said.

Councilwoman Kathleen Hicks, whose district includes the Masonic site, said in a statement that the contract is creating “a renewed sense of hope and opportunity among residents. This is a wonderful example of what happens when an engaged community, the city, and the developer work together in a positive way.”

The Mallick Group now will do a due-diligence review of the property, and it could take up to a year to close the deal, said Jim Nyfeler, chairman of the Masonic Home and School’s strategic planning committee.

The Masonic Grand Lodge of Texas in December 2004 voted to close the 107-year-old Fort Worth campus because it became too costly to operate.

The home opened in 1899 to care for the widows and orphans of Masons, but it grew to become a school serving economically disadvantaged children.

Although the school graduated its last class in June 2005 and the buildings have been vacant since, the Masonic Home and School continues to place and help children when needed, Nyfeler said.

In addition to entering into the contract with the Mallick Group, the Grand Lodge of Texas has leased mineral rights to Dale Resources, Nyfeler said.

Under the land-use plan, Dale Resources will conduct horizontal drilling from a buffered 11-acre pad in the southwest corner of the property, at Mitchell Boulevard, Mallick said.

“Dale will be using state-of-the-art sound mitigation combined with berm construction which will further minimize neighborhood disturbance,” Dale Resources President Larry Dale said in a statement.

Mallick said he will be the property’s facilitating developer and that he will work with home builders and commercial developers.

There could be 500 to 600 houses, priced from $140,000 to just above $200,000, he said.

Mallick said he will seek a single user for the Masonic structures, such as a nonprofit group or private school.

A few of the structures built since the 1960s will likely be removed, he said.

“This is a high-risk project,” Mallick said. “It’s been a lot of work, and there’s still hard work ahead.”

The land is in an area where the Fort Worth City Council is considering creating a tax-increment finance district, under which tax revenue from property value increases or new development is put into a fund to pay for projects inside the district. Because the Masonic Home site is now off the tax rolls, such as district would see a windfall when the land again became taxable.

Mallick is developing Sierra Vista, a 95-acre urban village near East Berry Street and South Riverside Drive, about one mile west of the Masonic site.

Sierra Vista will have about 232 houses and some shopping centers.

#2 cjyoung

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:48 PM

I grew up in the neighborhood, so I really hope this gets done.

#3 vjackson

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:57 PM

That would be awesome. That part of FW has been ignored for way too long.

#4 ghughes

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 05:01 AM

Great news. We were by there on Saturday and I was wondering what might happen. Sure hope the developer can attract a variety of builders including some custom homes. Although the price points mentioned might be a bit low, it would be nice to see Village Homes, etc. at work there.

I haven't noticed any progress over at Riverside yet, but maybe it's back off the main roads.

#5 JBB

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 07:46 AM

Panel OKs plan for Masonic site
By BARRY SHLACHTER
Star-Telegram Staff Writer

Emmitt Smith tore apart NFL defenses and faced down Mario Lopez on the dance floor.

Now he's dealing with Fort Worth City Hall.

Smith, a former Dallas Cowboys star running back and now a property developer, appeared before the city's Landmarks Commission on Monday and successfully argued for the demolition of the 84-year-old Masonic Home dorm and carpentry shop in southeast Fort Worth to make way for a $50 million commercial development.

Smith envisions bringing big-box stores and restaurants to the neighborhoods just southwest of Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway.

"He's a real estate junkie like the rest of us," said Michael Mallick, the Fort Worth developer who sold the property in 2005 to a group that now is selling part of it to Smith.

The Masonic Home site is 201 acres. Of that, 170 acres is slated for redevelopment. The rest is broken up between a gas-drilling site and the Masonic Home's "core campus," which Mallick expects to donate to the All Church Home in Fort Worth, a nonprofit charity that runs residential and other programs for children.

Smith's firm, SmithCypress Partners of Dallas, is under contract to buy 63 of the 170 acres from developer Happy Baggett, with plans to turn it into a shopping center called Mason Heights Village. Baggett plans 500 to 600 houses, ranging in price from $130,000 to $200,000, on the rest of the 170 acres and is recruiting builders.

Monday, the Landmarks Commission voted unanimously to allow the developers to raze three 1920s structures and 15 other buildings dating to the 1960s. The 10 buildings on the Masonic Home's core campus will remain.

City staff had recommended a 180-day delay, saying there was insufficient cause for immediate demolition.

Mary Saltarelli of Historic Fort Worth urged the commission to spare the buildings. Saltarelli warned that demolition could jeopardize federal tax benefits for the All Church Home, which plans to remodel and occupy the 10 core campus buildings.

One of the buildings to be razed is a former dairy barn that is in the way of Baggett's residential project. A 20,000-square-foot dormitory-turned-office-building called the Remmert Building and a carpentry shop are obstacles to Smith's planned development, Baggett said. Smith could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

"The National Registry has designated [those buildings] to be of statewide significance with both architectural and historical importance," Saltarelli said Tuesday. "I was the only one to speak of their historical preservation value."

Smith, 38, spoke to the commission for five minutes after Saltarelli.

Rather than talk about preservation, Smith said the area's population had been abandoned by mainstream retailers. There are lots of liquor stores in the area but few shops selling necessities aside from a Minyard grocery store and a Walgreen drugstore, Smith told the commission.

SmithCypress Partners is conducting due diligence before closing on its 63 acres, said Jeca Salas, a spokeswoman for Smith.

All Church Home

Wayne Carson, executive director of All Church Home since 1987, acknowledged that demolishing some of the historic Masonic Home buildings could jeopardize tax credits, but he indicated that that isn't a major concern.

If the project goes through, he envisions moving to the site in a few years and selling the home's leafy main 6.5-acre site on Sum- mit Avenue off Interstate 30 near downtown Fort Worth. Carson said the All Church Home has fielded inquiries about the site over the years but has never sought interest.

Building renovations of $1.6 million on the Masonic Home campus could yield more than $320,000 worth of tax credits that could be sold to a large commercial enterprise such as a bank at a 20 percent discount, possibly netting the home as much as $250,000, Carson said.

There is no way to pre- dict whether demolition of the three buildings will affect the historic registry status, said Stephanie Dugan, a director of the National Development Council, a nonprofit agency that helps secure and resell tax credits on historic preservation projects.

"It's up to the National Park Service, and the park service has a mind of its own," said Dugan, who has advised the home on the deal.

Jerre Tracy, executive director of Historic Fort Worth, said the tax-credit issue meant little to the developers. At a meeting weeks ago, Tracy said she told them that transferable credits could jump to 39 percent of renovation costs because they would be part of a so-called new market project helping to rejuvenate a minority area.

"In 30 years, I've never asked for a tax credit," said Baggett. "Just too many strings attached."

SMITHCYPRESS PARTNERS

Started in 2005

President is Emmitt Smith

Has $1.7 billion worth of projects under development in the United States and the Bahamas.

As a minority business enterprise, has secured capital from the Carlyle Group, a private-equity investment firm.

North Texas developments include Village on the Green across from Dallas' Galleria.
Barry Shlachter, 817-390-7718
bshlachter@star-telegram.com

#6 cjyoung

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 11:49 AM

Thanks Emmitt for doing something that no one else wants to do! wub.gif

#7 MetroCode

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 01:47 PM

Happy Baggett is a nut! I love talking to that guy about Fort Worth and his Happy-isms::
Happy-isms
"I used to be 6 feet tall and have dark hair, till I started in Real Estate."


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#8 safly

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 06:21 PM

QUOTE(cjyoung @ Jul 11 2007, 12:49 PM) View Post

Thanks Emmitt for doing something that no one else wants to do! wub.gif


I hope he can bring an IKEA or Restaurant Depot out there. I've been pushing for both to consider SE FW for some time now. MLK area is a gold mine for those warehouse retailers.

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#9 John T Roberts

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 09:05 PM

Even though redevelopment of the property is good for the neighborhood, it is not without preservation issues. Three of the historic campus buildings are slated for demolition, and the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission unanimously approved the demolitions. The three buildings are on the fringe of the V shaped campus of historic buildings. City Staff and Historic Fort Worth spoke in opposition to the demolition. Now, some alumni are starting to speak up. Here's a link to a follow-up article in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

http://www.star-tele...ory/170358.html

#10 seurto

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 06:16 AM

I have to say, I'm really surprised there isn't more opposition to this. These buildings seem much more significant historically than the Knights of Pythias building, and yet no hoo-ha. I guess historical preservation is very subjective, and maybe it should be; it just seems strange that the world could end over a small structure that is very limited in it's use and will require great renovation, while here are larger structures with more significance to more people. I have no idea what kind of shape they are in, what they could be used for (weren't they a seniors' home for a while?); I do understand they are in a very valuable location. I just think it's interesting. huh.gif

#11 John T Roberts

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 06:25 AM

Most of the buildings on the Masonic Home Campus were in good shape. Actually, they are in much better condition than the Knights of Pythias building. All of this probably has something to do with visibility. Since the Masonic Home & School is on a large acreage, seeing each individual buildings is difficult. You only see the campus as a whole.

The master plan that I saw for the site, was so close to a good preservation plan, yet so far. You have 13 contributing historic buildings, yet three on the fringe were considered expendable, so they are proposed to be demolished. Two of the three were the oldest buildings on campus, and the third matched the integrity of the remaining 1920's buildings.

#12 djold1

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 06:27 AM

IPB Image

Above is a 1910 postcard reproduction that shows some of the endangered buildings. Hard to believe that they are probably not going to integrate many of the great old buildings into the development.

This is a little off topic, but I thought you might like to see a few of the artifacts that the North Fort Worth Historical Society and the Stockyards Museum rescued a few months ago after a last minute call took several members to the site. The interior of a number of the buildings had been stripped (trashed, really) internally and the contents were scheduled to go into the dumpster the next day. Tom Weiderhold who got the alert called some of us and we went down to one of the buildings to see if there was anything that could be saved for future documentation of one of Fort Worth's great landmark institutions.

There wasn't a lot left. We found a great poster for one of the Might Mites, probably from the 1930's era:

IPB Image

This poster is now on display at the Stockyards Musuem in the Livestock Exchange building in the Stockyards. The Museum would like to know who this great looking player is and everything about his team. Here is a head shot that has more detail...

IPB Image

Please contact Sarah Biles at the Stockyards Museum 817-625-5082 if you have any details to add.

Also rescued was a large and charming group shot of some of the kids. The Museum would also like to have more details...

IPB Image

This old hand printing press was also salvaged:

IPB Image

The Stockyards Museum, which is operated by the North Fort Worth Historical Society of which I am a Trustee, is actively engaged in saving as much of the memories of old Fort Worth as possible. While the emphasis is on North Fort Worth, the NFWHS has some of the largest archives of Fort Worth and Tarrant County history and is always open to considering new collections, documents and items. For instance, for many years, the Museum has been the conservator of the Palace Theater Light Bulb from downtown Fort Worth. It has been burning for almost 100 years.

The Stockyards Museum has truly become the Museum of Fort Worth.

As many of you know, the Museum archives are constanly being accessed for documentation, pictures, plans, maps and other details for those interested in the history, preservation and reconstruction of this area.

Even though the Stockyards Museum has limited space, receives no funding from any Fort Worth city or county source, has no business sponsorships or large trusts, is staffed mostly by volunteers for up to 7 days per week, and depends almost entirely on the donations from its visitors, every effort will be made to include worthy donations into its archives.

For those that want to work with nice people in a truly historical setting the Museum is also accepting applications for volunteers to work in a number of areas. Check the website for further information..

Stockyards Museum

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The Fort Worth Gazette blog
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#13 Buck

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 07:06 AM

>>> The 10 buildings on the Masonic Home's core campus will remain.

So I'm confused.

What buildings are we losing that are important, and why are they important if the 10 core buildings will remain?



#14 M C Toyer

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 08:07 AM

re the football poster:

Pete -

I don't know if it relates directly but the Mity Mites were a football powerhouse from 1927 to 1942 under coach Rusty Russell. They compiled a 132-30-9 reccord that included 4 undefeated seasons, 6 district championships, and 3 trips to the state semifinals. In 1932 they fought Corsciana to a scoreless tie for the state class A title only to lose on penetrations.
-----------
Mike Jones, "Of Mites and Men." 'Dallas Morning News, 12 June 1970

I'll send the source material to Sarah.

M C

#15 safly

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 08:14 AM

That football player is a spittin image of Tony Romo.

As for the school children, if you notice in the upper middle row you will se a Tom Hanks, Donny Deutsch and that one kid from The Christmas Story and The Breakup.

They so need to have 1 game out of the NFL schedule were all the teams are forced to play wearing those old style helmets. Make em EARN their keep and RESPECT the game.

Judging by the pic's, can one assume that this school was segregated?
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#16 John T Roberts

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 09:46 PM

Buck, the entire scope of the project was very unclear until the Landmarks Commission meeting on July 9th. I'm working on an overlay of an aerial photograph to better show the building locatios; however, that won't really show us the character of the buildings remaining or the ones being demolished. This map is drawn from memory, so I won't guarantee its accuracy.

Channel 4 News at 9:00 had a story on the Masonic Home development, but didn't show the buildings remaining or the ones that will be demolished.

#17 cjyoung

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 11:53 AM

QUOTE(John T Roberts @ Jul 16 2007, 10:05 PM) View Post

Even though redevelopment of the property is good for the neighborhood, it is not without preservation issues. Three of the historic campus buildings are slated for demolition, and the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission unanimously approved the demolitions. The three buildings are on the fringe of the V shaped campus of historic buildings. City Staff and Historic Fort Worth spoke in opposition to the demolition. Now, some alumni are starting to speak up. Here's a link to a follow-up article in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

http://www.star-tele...ory/170358.html


I'm sure the neighborhood would be willing to listen to a better plan.

I'm for preserving history, but I don't think those who oppose the demolition have the means to bring other development to the area.

#18 seurto

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 06:11 AM

I'm curious about whether anyone remembered to unchain FireEater from the K of P bldg? He seems to be missing from this discussion. cool.gif

#19 John T Roberts

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 06:01 AM

Buck, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram has partially answered your question before I could get a map drawn showing the buildings. The print version has a site plan of the development showing the new retail and the location of the controversial dorm building. However, it does not show the locations of the other two buildings proposed for demolition. Even better than what I could do, the paper has a photograph of the Remmert Dorm to show the character of the buildings being lost. I apologize for not getting the map drawn, but I have been working 10-12 hours every day and weekends, and its really hard to get everything done when I get home.

The article is basically saying that the neighborhood's needs trump historic preservation. Here's a link to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram article: http://www.star-tele...ory/178808.html

#20 djold1

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Posted 03 August 2007 - 05:36 AM

Here is a little update on the history of some of the Masonic Home items shown above that were saved and that are currently in the Stockyards Museum archives in the Livestock Exchange Building in the Stockyards:

We have received a little information on Allie White, the Mity Mite football player in the picture. This caption is now on the large cut-out picture which is currently on display in the Museum:

IPB Image

Also Melinda Corder apparently saw the pictures in the Forum and sent a note to Sara Biles the Museum Administrator, that said in part:

QUOTE
We did figure out that the picture could not have been before the school year 1965-1966 nor later than 1966-1967 because of the students in the photo and the oldest kids (upper right hand corner) were 7th--most likely or 8th graders (graduating class of 1971). During the time of the photo, ages of children at the Home were age 3-graduating seniors.


They have apparently identified a number of the kids in the group picture.

Melinda also included a very interesting link to the Masonic Home website . You will need to have the free PowerPoint reader installed to look at the slide shows. The Gallery & Museum are interesting. There are some good pictures of the old buildings and campus. They obviously did some last minute picture taking in the old Museum to make a partial record. I assume that some of these items are in storage somewhere.

The Stockyards Museum hours are 10AM-5PM Monday-Saturday and Noon to 5PM on Sunday for those interested in seeing the Allie White poster cutout.

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The Fort Worth Gazette blog
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Website: Antique Maps of Texas
Large format reproductions of original antique and vintage Texas & southwestern maps
 


#21 walton91

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 07:43 PM

QUOTE(M C Toyer @ Jul 17 2007, 09:07 AM) View Post

re the football poster:

Pete -

I don't know if it relates directly but the Mity Mites were a football powerhouse from 1927 to 1942 under coach Rusty Russell. They compiled a 132-30-9 reccord that included 4 undefeated seasons, 6 district championships, and 3 trips to the state semifinals. In 1932 they fought Corsciana to a scoreless tie for the state class A title only to lose on penetrations.
-----------
Mike Jones, "Of Mites and Men." 'Dallas Morning News, 12 June 1970

I'll send the source material to Sarah.

M C


I have seen this thread for months but not knowing what the Masonic Home was, I never read it, until now. I just recently started reading Jim Dent's new book about the Mighty Mites "12 Mighty Orphans" and decided to read about the Home and proposed development. In the book I just got to the part right before the 32 State Championship game in Corsicana. You didn't even give me a spoiler alert! Now it's ruined! laugh.gif That player does look like Tony Romo!

#22 Sborlh

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 11:20 AM

QUOTE(cjyoung @ Jul 10 2006, 08:48 PM) View Post

I grew up in the neighborhood, so I really hope this gets done.


I am just wondering what the city planners in Fort Worth was thinking when they approved the development of the Masonic Home Land$$$$$. The only thing I think they were thinking of was money as always in Poly. The development of the Home's land will bring in taxes. This land, being tax exempt was not taxed so this will be extra money (1.2 – 2 million for the city of Fort Worth per year. However, at what costs$ It is true that the home is next a golf course and this land could be developed to be worth more money than it is worth today. However so could Cobb or Sycamore Park.
When I lived in Poly, back in the 60’s and 70’s, this was a great place to live. I remember the Poly theater, The Westerner, Piggy Wiggly, Five and Dine, Dairy Queen, Mother’s Pizza, and Atlantic Spartan. I remember walking around the neighborhood and never even thought that something could happen to me. Many houses had flowers and shrubs planted in the front yards. The neighborhood had a diverse ethic population but mostly elderly. Two years ago I drove down Vaughn Blvd between Rosemont and Berry and I saw 5 police cars with their lights on at 5 different places. All of the stores have been closed. Any store that is open looks like Fort Knox. Street lights are dim. Dark was what I saw and felt. No one was walking about. The only people I saw were living under the 287 bridge. What happened$$$
I have seen this also happen to Pleasant Grove in Dallas. The old die off. The relatives sell off the homes. The new owner rents the house. The house is not being taken care of because the landlord wants to make profits and the renter pays his rent and should not pay for the up keep. The rent gets cheaper as the house deteriorates. Thieves repeatedly break into homes and scare out the good people in the neighborhood. The poor people moves into the neighborhood. After so long no one wants to live in it so the landlord cannot rent it and the costs is too great to repair. The rest of the neighborhood value will keep on going down the more houses that are not being lived in. Kids start joining gangs to feel safer. Soon drug users start using these houses. Shops close because of crime. This creates even less jobs. Shoplifters, drug sells, and robbery are the main income for the drug users and gangs. Extra police are called in to try to control the crime but they cannot be everywhere. Poverty and ghetto are now adjectives for this neighborhood.
Adding 400-500 new homes may not be the answer to this situation. It might just give the thieves more people to rob, steal, or kill. If nothing else is done within 10 to 20 years from now, with high crime, these houses will be added to the slum that is now called Poly or Riverside. The neighborhoods need to be cleaned out of all drug and condemned houses and bulldozed with the costs billed to the land. Low interest loans need to be granted to help people rebuild. People need to fell like that it is worth putting money back into the neighborhood. Drug dealers need to be arrested and made to leave town. If taxes are not paid on the houses they need to be sold at market and give the new owner a certain time to up grade the house. Civic and church groups need to adopt the poor elderly and help them with repairs. There needs to be enough low income housing complexes for the poor to live in. Even though the poor has less, they are robed more than any other. Gated communities with cameras at every gate, and most hallways, needs to be installed and recorded. Security alarms will be needed to be in every unit. Infrastructure needs to be upgraded also.
However, the land and houses around the home are in better shape than the rest of the neighborhood. It seems that the people around the Home think that it is worth the money to keep their homes in better shape than the other home owners in Poly. It might be because they see a large lot of virgin land and know that it is keeping the traffic down. Or maybe that it is like living next to a park. Or could it be that they have less neighbors that might rob from them. Or could it be that they are living next to history. Who knows why$ Even the internet shows that the houses around the Masonic Home values are up compared to areas in Poly.
I am just wondering if any of these ideals are being worker out or is the city just going to let these houses add to the ghetto$$ If this does not work out when is the city of Fort Worth going to sell Cobb or Sycamore Park to build housing on them$$$ Maybe last you can sell the Stockyards to build housing on that property that has less history than Masonic Home had$$$$ Then the city of Fort Worth can have more tax money coming in$$$$$

Stephen Borrego


#23 Sborlh

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 11:53 AM

QUOTE(cjyoung @ Jul 10 2006, 08:48 PM) View Post

I grew up in the neighborhood, so I really hope this gets done.



#24 bhudson

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 01:48 PM

QUOTE(Sborlh @ Dec 19 2007, 11:20 AM) View Post

The neighborhoods need to be cleaned out of all drug and condemned houses and bulldozed with the costs billed to the land. Low interest loans need to be granted to help people rebuild. People need to fell like that it is worth putting money back into the neighborhood. Drug dealers need to be arrested and made to leave town. If taxes are not paid on the houses they need to be sold at market and give the new owner a certain time to up grade the house. Civic and church groups need to adopt the poor elderly and help them with repairs. There needs to be enough low income housing complexes for the poor to live in. Even though the poor has less, they are robed more than any other. Gated communities with cameras at every gate, and most hallways, needs to be installed and recorded. Security alarms will be needed to be in every unit. Infrastructure needs to be upgraded also.


Wow, you don't want much, do you? And what, pray tell, is your role in all this?

#25 Fort Worthology

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Posted 26 December 2007 - 01:38 PM

I would be curious to see this plan. I do hope it's not sprawly.

- Architecture/urban planning/transit blogger, Fort Worth Weekly

Fort Worth District 9 Zoning Commissioner


#26 cjyoung

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Posted 26 December 2007 - 04:02 PM

QUOTE(Sborlh @ Dec 19 2007, 11:20 AM) View Post

Maybe last you can sell the Stockyards to build housing on that property that has less history than Masonic Home had$$$$ Then the city of Fort Worth can have more tax money coming in$$$$$

Stephen Borrego


I'd actually like to see condos built in the stockyards. cool.gif

#27 cjyoung

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Posted 26 December 2007 - 04:05 PM

QUOTE(Sborlh @ Dec 19 2007, 11:20 AM) View Post

Adding 400-500 new homes may not be the answer to this situation. It might just give the thieves more people to rob, steal, or kill.


I guess we should all just move to Crowley or Keller. dry.gif

#28 John T Roberts

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Posted 26 December 2007 - 04:26 PM

Unfortunately, from what I have seen of it, the project is very sprawly.

#29 AndyN

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Posted 26 December 2007 - 05:14 PM

Did I already ask about the status of the interurban stop? Is it in the path of destruction or proposed for preservation? From what I have heard I thought there was a nice little shelter there.
Www.fortwortharchitecture.com

#30 cjyoung

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 12:32 PM

QUOTE (John T Roberts @ Dec 26 2007, 04:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Unfortunately, from what I have seen of it, the project is very sprawly.


Are there any other developers that are interested in doing any other projects nearby?




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