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New building for Museum of Science and History

Cultural District Museums New Construction

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#51 RD Milhollin

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 10:19 PM

QUOTE(cberen1 @ Apr 12 2007, 10:00 AM) View Post

You've got Fine Art, Modern Art, Western Art, Science & History, and Western Women of Influence. If you added another one, what would you add that wasn't at all specialized?


The Southwest Regional Smithsonian Museum.

If we hadn't lost the B-36 it would have gone well there, or in a separate (admittedly specialized) Museum of Flight in Fort Worth.

#52 courtnie

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 08:05 PM

Frankly the design is ok...parking seems to be an issue..I was hoping for something that looked more like a spanish revival then a sprawling bland building. Also on another note the Cowgirl museum is ok. Went over spring break and wasnt impressed. The rubber ducks in the gift shop were 12.00 each...and yes you do get free admission to the museum of science and history. I will miss the old building really..i grew up there..so it has alot of meaning to it for me.

#53 mosteijn

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:12 PM

QUOTE(courtnie @ Apr 16 2007, 09:05 PM) View Post

I was hoping for something that looked more like a spanish revival then a sprawling bland building.

I feel spanish revival would have been far more bland than anything modern the musuem could have done. That's just what the cultural district needs - another faux historic "landmark".

#54 Fort Worthology

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:17 PM

QUOTE(Jonnyrules23 @ Apr 16 2007, 10:12 PM) View Post

QUOTE(courtnie @ Apr 16 2007, 09:05 PM) View Post

I was hoping for something that looked more like a spanish revival then a sprawling bland building.

I feel spanish revival would have been far more bland than anything modern the musuem could have done. That's just what the cultural district needs - another faux historic "landmark".


And I, of course, would have preferred Spanish Revival over Legorreta's design (big surprise, huh?). I'll take historic revival (there is no such thing as "faux historic," no matter how much the high-minded architect types want there to be - there is only a rich catalogue of styles from all eras, none of which should be off-limits) over drab modern any day.

As for Legorreta's design, I don't think it's drab, neccessarily. I don't think it's great, either. Somewhere in the middle, IMHO. Compared to the other museums in the CD, I'd probably rank it my least-favorite of all at the moment, though.

(My fav alternates between the Kimbell and the Modern, if you're curious, so you can't go accusing me of playing the traditional architecture card here. smile.gif The Carter's neat, but doesn't call to me, and I dig the Cowgirl no matter what anybody else thinks.)

#55 mosteijn

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:37 PM

You make a good point about "historic revival" I must admit. I actually like a lot of those styles for houses, when done right, and am lukewarm to them for commercial structures (depends on the context). But museums, I think, by their very nature should at least attempt to be different. Museums are places that provoke thought and challenge the "accepted" and give people a taste of the possiblities. Museums shouldn't just be shoeboxes that you keep all your neat stuff in - they should be in and of themselves masterpieces. Museums should be civic icons, and icons don't just "fit in."

For the record, I'm not very enthused with Legoretta's design either...though I don't hate it. I just think he could have been more daring, given his past work.

#56 vjackson

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 07:20 AM

QUOTE(Jonnyrules23 @ Apr 16 2007, 10:37 PM) View Post

But museums, I think, by their very nature should at least attempt to be different. Museums are places that provoke thought and challenge the "accepted" and give people a taste of the possiblities. Museums shouldn't just be shoeboxes that you keep all your neat stuff in - they should be in and of themselves masterpieces. Museums should be civic icons, and icons don't just "fit in."


I couldnt' have said it better Johnny. That's why I'm somewhat disappointed in this design. It's not bad, but Legorreta has done much better, more daring work. It looks very much like a high school I saw in California.

#57 cberen1

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 08:56 AM

I've often felt that the Post Office downtown looks like some museums ought to. I think the exterior lends to a feeling of reverence similar to what is felt in old churches and libraries. In fact, the layout and design might be great for a sculpture center.

#58 safly

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 12:46 PM

Sort of like this, but without the LIONS.

IPB Image

The Art Institute of Chicago

or this


IPB Image

the Shedd wub.gif


COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#59 cberen1

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 02:33 PM

The art institute is exactly what I was thinking about at the time.

#60 John T Roberts

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 11:09 AM

Demolition has begun on the building.

#61 RD Milhollin

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 10:42 AM

QUOTE(John T Roberts @ Nov 10 2007, 11:09 AM) View Post

Demolition has begun on the building.


That would be the old FW Museum of Science and History, not the Downtown Post Office, Shedd Aquarium, or Art Institute of Chicago. tongue.gif

#62 Thurman52

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 12:38 PM

Drove by today and they were putting up signs for parking for the groundbreaking

#63 Redshirt

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 01:42 PM

The FWMSH has a webcam that gives you control on their website:

http://www.fwmuseum....ity/webcam.html

I couldn't get the zoom to work but it just might be me.

Didn't know if anyone else saw this.

#64 mmiller2002

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 10:44 AM

What is with the huge pile of dirt? It surrounds a third of the height of the lamp post!

#65 mosteijn

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 09:07 AM

Update!





#66 dustin

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 09:28 AM

the museum held a topping out ceremony yesterday with the highest beam going on to the "urban lantern." There is still a lot of iron work to do, but it is progressing very fast.

#67 Fort Worthology

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 09:45 AM

Still really not sure about the new building. Having looked over high-res renderings extensively, I can already tell I hate all the big blank walls on the street. We'll see, I guess.

I am really glad that they were able to keep him a bit more subdued, though. If he'd really let loose I'd be afraid of what we'd be getting even more.

#68 dustin

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 03:36 PM

I actually think it is a fantastic building. Concerning the big blank walls, consider that is what is important about his buildings. Legoretta draws much of his aesthetic from traditional Latin American architecture, which favors the solid wall and strongly defined space over the open and airy aesthetic of modernism. I think once everyone has a chance to see the building in person, the experience will assuage the criticisms. Consider the big blank walls as part of the desired aesthetic, one that evokes the history of adobe and stone architecture of Latin and South America's past as well as an expression of color which is an important aspect of all of Legoretta's buildings.

I actually think it is a fantastic building. Concerning the big blank walls, consider that is what is important about his buildings. Legoretta draws much of his aesthetic from traditional Latin American architecture, which favors the solid wall and strongly defined space over the open and airy aesthetic of modernism. I think once everyone has a chance to see the building in person, the experience will assuage the criticisms. Consider the big blank walls as part of the desired aesthetic, one that evokes the history of adobe and stone architecture of Latin and South America's past as well as an expression of color which is an important aspect of all of Legoretta's buildings.

#69 Fort Worthology

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 08:06 AM

QUOTE (dustin @ Jul 16 2008, 04:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I actually think it is a fantastic building. Concerning the big blank walls, consider that is what is important about his buildings. Legoretta draws much of his aesthetic from traditional Latin American architecture, which favors the solid wall and strongly defined space over the open and airy aesthetic of modernism.


I'm no big fan of most modernism, but at the same time, there's some distance between "blank featureless wall 'o stucco" and "plate glass transparent." With the building on the street like that, I want to see *something* - smaller windows, some sort of detailing/trim, places for posters of exhibits, a mural, whatever.

QUOTE
I think once everyone has a chance to see the building in person, the experience will assuage the criticisms. Consider the big blank walls as part of the desired aesthetic, one that evokes the history of adobe and stone architecture of Latin and South America's past as well as an expression of color which is an important aspect of all of Legoretta's buildings.


The desired aesthetic shouldn't preclude the building from being so bleak at the street level, though. If it does, perhaps the desired aesthetic should be rethought.

EDIT: Looks in some renderings like the actual street level might be some sort of stone, which is an improvement. Something with texture, anyway.

#70 dustin

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 10:45 AM

QUOTE (Atomic Glee @ Jul 17 2008, 09:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm no big fan of most modernism, but at the same time, there's some distance between "blank featureless wall 'o stucco" and "plate glass transparent." With the building on the street like that, I want to see *something* - smaller windows, some sort of detailing/trim, places for posters of exhibits, a mural, whatever.

The desired aesthetic shouldn't preclude the building from being so bleak at the street level, though. If it does, perhaps the desired aesthetic should be rethought.

EDIT: Looks in some renderings like the actual street level might be some sort of stone, which is an improvement. Something with texture, anyway.


See, I think that modernism has changed the way we interact with spaces, and not always for the better. Don't get me wrong, I am a huge cheerleader for mid-century modernism and minimalism. However, what has permeated into everyday architecture, is that everyone is so eager to open every aspect of their buildings to their surrounding environment. Windows are everywhere; big massive windows. What I love about Legoretta's buildings are that he is happy to define his spaces with a strong wall. His buildings harken back to precolumbian architecure while maintaining the sculptural aspects of contemporary aesthetic. I know that there are few supporters of Brutalism and even the subsequent Deconstructivism or "Structural Expressionism," but there are elements of these movements that have good ideas. We shouldn't be so quick to ornament every square inch of a building, otherwise we end up with David Schwartz (sorry I had to get that one in). The strength and surface of a wall should be just as relevant as 40 ft. tall angels or art deco detailing. I will say this, though, the proof will be in the pudding. All we have right now are renderings, so we can argue all day long about the FWSH museum until our faces turn blue.

#71 Fort Worthology

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 11:04 AM

Ornament gives people walking by something to appreciate. My problem with the attitude of "defining spaces with strong solid walls" deal is that you're basically doing whatever you want inside, and to hell with the street. I don't like that. Buildings should relate to both their interiors and their exteriors. There are plenty of historic buildings with strong, solid walls that are still more interesting than blank, featureless walls. The interior's not the only important thing - the building should relate to its site, context, and pedestrians.

I guess we'll see. I've been told that the original design was wilder and brighter, and the Basses and Schwarz encouraged Legoretta to subdue and rework it into the form we see in the renderings. If true, I'm glad - one thing I love about the Cultural District is that it's not succumbed to starchitect-itis. Johnson, Khan, Ando...they have designed magnificent buildings that are still subdued and subtle - and timeless, not then-current starchitect fad. If it was filled with whatever "hot" idea there is out there it'd be less than it is now. The end result with the new Legoretta is that we're getting something that, whatever my personal feelings are (and I reserve final judgement until construction is complete), it's still not going to be some ridiculous starchitect jumble. For that, I'm grateful.

#72 longhornz32

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 02:39 PM

QUOTE (Atomic Glee @ Jul 17 2008, 12:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Johnson, Khan, Ando...they have designed magnificent buildings that are still subdued and subtle - and timeless, not then-current starchitect fad. If it was filled with whatever "hot" idea there is out there it'd be less than it is now. The end result with the new Legoretta is that we're getting something that, whatever my personal feelings are (and I reserve final judgement until construction is complete), it's still not going to be some ridiculous starchitect jumble. For that, I'm grateful.


As Ted Flato once said, "Timeless architecture needn't shout."

I think part of the reason we have been fortunate is the type of architects that have been chosen. The quality that Ando, Kahn, Johnson and Legoretta bring are just as good if not better(in some opinions) than say a Gehry, Libeskind or Calatrava who get so much attention because of their radical designs. I agree with Ted and I think Fort Worth, as well, has a culture and humility that it doesn't want it's buildings to shout.



#73 360texas

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 03:33 PM

I still think that 'Form follows function' The building design should be such that it services 'whats going on in the inside' and that it should work as a whole unit.

Dave still at

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Visit 360texas.com


#74 Thurman52

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:19 PM

Is it me or does this project seem to be dragging? I figured by now they would be at least dried in, but so much ironworks still showing.

#75 cberen1

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 07:55 PM

Any recent photos? I drove by and things seem to be coming along nicely.

#76 Fort Worthology

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 09:59 PM

QUOTE (cberen1 @ Dec 19 2008, 07:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Any recent photos? I drove by and things seem to be coming along nicely.


I'll be at the museums tomorrow and will try to get some shots.

#77 Bonfire98A

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 04:17 PM

The 25-ton dome of the new Noble Planetarium has been set in place.

http://www.dallasnew...s...21228&shu=1

#78 longhornz32

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 08:25 PM

I was able to attend a tour and presentation given by the Fort Worth AIA along with Gideon Toal and The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. I was able to get a few pictures below. There are some great details to this building and even in the hectic layout of mid construction there were some amazing spaces. I look forward to seeing the final product!

The rest of this tower will be painted the yellow to match the windows.


There is recessed uplighting at the top of these yellow structures which produces a great light.


This courtyard was created around this existing tree.


Skylight


#79 mmiller2002

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 11:32 AM

Driving by this every day, it sure looks like the neighborhood side (Montgomery) could be getting the short end of the stick, view-wise. All that HVAC stuff on top is exposed. I hope that they camoflauge it tastefully somehow.

#80 John T Roberts

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 08:31 PM

I attended the tour also, but I didn't take photographs.

I am sure that the HVAC equipment will eventually be screened.

#81 RD Milhollin

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 10:11 AM

A dinosaur skeleton has been moved into the main atrium of the Fort Worth Science and History Museum:

 

http://www.star-tele...le84992342.html

 

And not just ANY dinosaur skeleton; the newest resident exhibit out front is Paluxysaurus Jonesi, the state dinosaur of Texas. The skeleton is 60 feet (18 m) long and was formerly exhibited in the DinoLabs section of the museum. Find out more about Fort Worth's oldest museum at their online site

 

http://www.fwmuseum.org/







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