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Museum Place

Cultural District Museum Place W. 7th Street

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#1 jefffwd

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 11:14 AM

NEW GATEWAY
Urban village to rise at entry to Cultural District
By SANDRA BAKER
STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER

Called Museum Place, the development will involve at least $150 million worth of new construction during the next five years and will include several buildings up to eight stories tall for 500 apartments and condos, 80,000 square feet of leading-edge office space, 160,000 square feet of space for shops and restaurants, and a 180-room high-end hotel.

Moreover, the development could bring about 850 residents to the area, create several hundred service jobs and likely spark further development along West Seventh Street.

JaGee Real Properties, a Fort Worth-based real-estate developer and investor, a few years ago began buying the land needed for the project, primarily from University Drive to Boland Street, and Camp Bowie Boulevard to Sixth Street. Now that most of the land needed for the project is secured, and the project appears to be falling into place, the developer is more openly discussing what's planned. JaGee has about 95 percent of the land and is negotiating for the final parcels.

A big step for the project may come today as JaGee is expected to receive a $2.4 million grant from the North Central Texas Council of Governments that will be used to defray the cost of fixing and moving streets, widening sidewalks and building a public plaza, among other things. The project is designed to be pedestrian-friendly and encourage people to live, work and play there. The group will vote on the request in Arlington this afternoon.

It's the first public money that has been designated for the project, and the developer plans to look for other public funding sources as well as seek tax incentives from the city.

"We've done a lot of work and yet the work is just beginning," said Richard Garvey, president of JaGee. "We've been patient because we think it's a good idea."

The council of governments will be awarding $40 million to a handful of projects across North Texas under its sustainable development program, which helps projects aimed at reducing the number of cars on the highways. Requests totaled $239 million. JaGee asked for $6.6 million, but that was reduced to $2.4 million in the staff recommendation.

"We feel like they're a good example of what we need in the region," said Mike Sims, a senior program manager.

The Museum Place project sprang from a study of some of the city's commercial corridors that recommended they be redeveloped, Garvey said. The entrance to the Cultural District at Seventh Street and University Drive was identified as a key area. Garvey said he felt he had some knowledge and the access to capital to get the project off the ground. But this will be a new venture for JaGee, which until now mainly has built strip shopping centers and industrial parks.

JaGee's offices are nearby, at Camp Bowie Boulevard and Arch Adams Street. Garvey said he has seen a decline in the past several years in the once-bustling neighborhood, despite the most recent addition of the Modern Art Museum across the street. The city's museums, zoo and Botantic Garden draw about 4 million visitors annually, according to the Fort Worth Convention & Visitors Bureau.

"The museums are such a gem to the city," Garvey said. "Our development will complement the style and quality of the museums."

Brandy O'Quinn, president of Historic Camp Bowie, whose organization oversees the nine-mile stretch of Camp Bowie Boulevard that begins at University Drive, said Museum Place will be an "awesome" gateway to the west side.

She said the development is another step in the larger development picture that began downtown and now takes in the retail and residential developments of So7 and Montgomery Plaza along West Seventh Street. Soon, it will include Trinity River Uptown, she said.

"It's our job to do those developments to have the people retailers will respond to," O'Quinn said.

Townsite Co., a Fort Worth architecture and urban planning firm headed by Phillip Poole, has worked with JaGee planning Museum Place. It will oversee the council of governments grant and work as a development manager on part of the project. The development, Poole said, is the chance to use the 11 acres -- of which about half is vacant -- more effectively.

"My whole challenge was to create a place for people to come to," Poole said.

JaGee plans to handle most of the developing, but it will likely find partners for portions of the project.

The first part of the development will be to build a 6,000-square-foot post office on University Drive, just north of Seventh Street and east of Bailey Street. JaGee will then swap the property for the Arlington Heights post office a few blocks away on Darcy Street. The Darcy Street land is an important parcel in the project and is where the bulk of the residences and about 70,000 square feet of retail space will be built, Garvey said.

The final design for the post office is expected soon, and construction could begin in 60 to 90 days, he said.

"Once that happens, the dirt will start to move. In the next eight months, people will see a lot of activity," Garvey said.

Apartments and condos will also be built north of Seventh Street, and between Barden and Arch Adams streets. A public plaza will be built at Seventh and Arch Adams streets. Most of the residences in Museum Place will be rental, but about two dozen condos will be included. The buildings will be true mixed-use, with the shops and restaurants at street level, and the apartments and condos stacked above.

After work begins on the post office, the 80,000 square feet of office space, 18 condos and additional retail space will be built on Seventh Street, between Bailey Avenue and Barden Street. JaGee is negotiating a joint venture to develop that building and is working to line up tenants.

A small retail building is also planned for the northwest corner of Seventh Street and Arch Adams, where the 7-Eleven convenience store will likely move. That structure will have five condos overlooking the public plaza.

A hotel is planned for Camp Bowie Boulevard and Arch Adams Street. Garvey said that preliminary discussions are under way with a hotelier, but that the hotel will be developed with a ground lease. A flatiron-style building is planned for Camp Bowie Boulevard and Barden Street.

Four parking structures will be built for almost 1,600 cars, but they will be hidden from the street. There will also be head-in street parking around the development for about 150 cars.

Museum Place is being designed and built to accommodate a light rail trolley line, which Garvey hopes will come from downtown into the Cultural District in the near future. "If and when it happens, we'd like to be prepared for it," he said.

IN THE KNOW

Possible street changes

in Museum Place

Reopen Sixth Street between Arch Adams and Barden streets through the Chase Bank drive-through.

Close the curve of Arch Adams at Seventh Street for a public plaza.

Close Darcy Street south from Seventh Street to near Boland Street, where one of the residential and retail buildings will be.

Extend Barden Street from Seventh Street to Camp Bowie Boulevard through a parking lot.

SOURCE: JaGee Holdings

#2 vjackson

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 03:19 PM

If this project comes to fruition and isn't changed or scaled back, it will be the coolest urban development in FW by far. Hopefully dirt will start moving on the dates mentioned.

#3 cjyoung

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 03:24 PM

QUOTE(vjackson @ Apr 13 2006, 04:19 PM) View Post

If this project comes to fruition and isn't changed or scaled back, it will be the coolest urban development in FW by far. Hopefully dirt will start moving on the dates mentioned.


I hope it happens before I'm 40 unsure.gif .

#4 cberen1

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 03:30 PM

QUOTE(cjyoung @ Apr 13 2006, 04:24 PM) View Post

I hope it happens before I'm 40 unsure.gif .


how much time does that give JaGee? rolleyes.gif

#5 mmiller2002

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 04:37 PM

Frankly, I'm a bit concerned about more traffic and congestion in my neighborhood area.
I like our area at the current population level. Smallish houses, no massive apartment compexes to crowd-up the streets. Leave that for the Cityview, Hulen areas.
We'll lose our nice little, "secret" post office, easy in-out.
Plus, any increase in nightime entertainment means drunks and noise.

I guess these things look nice to developers and architects, sicne that is their business, but I'd rather see the smaller buildings renovated, maybe a few added in character. But, there's not much money in that approach these days it seems. Everything grand and flashy.

I hope that it doesn't take too much FW public money. Its needed for streets, water, and sewer since they are all getting pretty aged in the old neighborhoods.

I just don't see people in FW walking very far, they love their SUVs, even just to go several blocks.
Do we really need more shopping and restaurants? They change frequently anyway.

Just my local opinion.

#6 mosteijn

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 06:19 PM

QUOTE(mmiller2002 @ Apr 13 2006, 05:37 PM) View Post

Frankly, I'm a bit concerned about more traffic and congestion in my neighborhood area.
I like our area at the current population level. Smallish houses, no massive apartment compexes to crowd-up the streets. Leave that for the Cityview, Hulen areas.
We'll lose our nice little, "secret" post office, easy in-out.
Plus, any increase in nightime entertainment means drunks and noise.

I guess these things look nice to developers and architects, sicne that is their business, but I'd rather see the smaller buildings renovated, maybe a few added in character. But, there's not much money in that approach these days it seems. Everything grand and flashy.

I hope that it doesn't take too much FW public money. Its needed for streets, water, and sewer since they are all getting pretty aged in the old neighborhoods.

I just don't see people in FW walking very far, they love their SUVs, even just to go several blocks.
Do we really need more shopping and restaurants? They change frequently anyway.

Just my local opinion.


I think you unfortunately represent a lot of the feeling in Fort Worth regarding new development. Why on EARTH does something new have to be bad? This is a good project. It will actually take traffic OFF your streets because it will place an emphasis on walking instead of driving. You mention public money and how it's needed for repairs and whatnot...well where does that money come from? Taxes! And where do taxes come from? Developments! Replacing derelict and vacant land with property that is bound to have far more taxable value will ultimately help the city more than hurt it (of course, assuming the amount of public money used in the project isn't some absurd percentage *cough* ACME *cough*).

And this isn't abut glamour and flashiness, this is about sustainable development. Why should we be opposed to urbanization? It's GOOD for the city. Not to mention the location of this project specifically. Can you imagine how much of a boon to tourism this will be when people can walk right accross the street from Fort Worth's already wonderful museums to some wonderful shopping, lodging and entertainment at the same time? Any flash and pizazz is to attempt to make the project more marketable, and thus, more successful, and honestly I haven't gotten a "flashy" image from this development; just a good natured, positive enhancement vibe.

I'm sorry, but whatever negative effects the people in Monticello think they'll have as a result of this development are paltry when considering the positive effects it will have on the REST of the city (yeah, we exist too, you know...)

(Btw, not directing this entirely at you mmiller, you just reminded me of the pent up thoughts I've been having as a result of the comments on the star-telegram's website. smilewinkgrin.gif )

#7 mmiller2002

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 08:44 PM

Johnnyrules,

Well its sort of like this, we moved to our hi-mount, monticello, heights neighborhoods because we liked the small, somewhat quiet, landlocked environment. We did not move here hoping that the areas would be redevloped, bringing in more people and noise. We did not have empty fields around a subdivision just waiting to be developed for an influx of people, like southwest FW/North Crowley. That's why all this redevelopment, McMansion/townhouse/condo building, hospital expansion, etc. in our old neighborhood is of concern.

I can see that you have a much different point of view. You're young and not invested/settled in an area that has been stable for some time. You're looking for excitement in the "big" city. Building things is fun. FW's urban development and entertainment playgrounds are just around the corner for you.

#8 Art Cooler

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 08:13 AM

Overall, I look forward to any coming development in and near the cultural district. At the same time I realize it will bring more traffic to the area. At the very least, this proposed development doesn't seem to be the classic "bulldoze old buildings to slap up strip malls, garden apartment complexes, and stand-alone chain eateries". Rather, it's more mixed use...incorporating various aspects in the quote above, among other things, with hopefully a bit more architectural interest.

As one employed by one of the museums, I see the coming development as a good thing for the cultural district overall. Any time a museum can see more attendance by an increased attraction to the area the museum resides within is a good thing. Although most of the museums have places to eat and shop within their walls, an increased variety of eateries, shops, etc. outside the museums will bring more folks, hopefully willing to walk around some since the area is quite accessible on foot. Residents living nearby along with visitors can enjoy the outdoor areas around the museum buildings, such as the Kimbell's shady expanse of green or the Carter's plaza with its spectacular view of downtown FW. Those of us who work in the CD can look forward to a wider variety of places to take lunch, shop, etc.

I can understand the concerns about traffic and so forth. Yet if the area is left alone, I don't see it improving in its present state over time, but rather deteriorating. That would not be good for an area that makes Fort Worth distinctive over other Texas cities. Nothing ever stands still...it either has to grow, be maintained, or wither.

There's bonuses and minuses to almost anything. As far as Museum Place goes, I say let's do it.

#9 mosteijn

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 10:25 AM

Jagee brings ‘neighborhood feel’ back to Cultural District

Aleshia Howe - April 17, 2006

Developers of the highly anticipated Museum Place recently unveiled renderings of their project to the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Development Committee, officially placing the $150 million mixed-use giant on the books.

Jagee Property Inc. President Richard Garvey said his company has owned at least some land in the Cultural District since 1982 and he is happy to see many years of planning come to fruition.

“We have wanted to see Museum Place for a while now, and it looks as though that could be very soon,” he said. “We’re sure the presentation to the Chamber was the first of many to come.”

Museum Place is an 11-acre urban village just west of downtown Fort Worth, slated to begin construction by the end of the year. The area, which is bound by Sixth Street to the north, Camp Bowie Boulevard to the south, University’s Six Points intersection to the east and Boland Street to the west, has lived mostly in rumor mills for the past four years. Garvey said that is because he and his company have wanted to take their time developing the project, ensuring its quality.

Now that specific architectural renderings have been released, Garvey said it is a matter of 60 to 90 days until more announcements for the development follow.

The project will house 160,000 square feet of retail space, 80,000 square feet of office and 550,000 square feet of residential development.

Since 2003, Jagee has purchased properties in the Cultural District totaling an appraised value of more than $3 million. The company’s acquisitions in the Cultural District during recent years include the former Al’s Trim Shop on Sixth Street, Six Points Car Wash on Bailey Street and the former Club Tequila’s on Barden Street.

Garvey said he saw the potential for the area from his former office space on Camp Bowie.

“Our project stemmed out of what we noticed happening in the area a few years ago,” Garvey said. “We were doing pretty well with property over there then we had a grand idea for this redevelopment. At the same time, the city was advocating the urban, mixed-use developments and our project was energized because of that.”

Garvey, who is a Fort Worth native, said he has regularly visited small storefronts in the Cultural District, such as barber shops and a former ice cream parlor, throughout his life, and that sense of community is what his development is all about.

“We want to take it back to what it once was – a corner bakery, a neighborhood theater,” Garvey said. “We are trying to recreate, with greater intensity, the neighborhood housing portion and retail mix, but really keep the flavor of what is there now and bring back the feeling that was there when there was a corner bakery.”

Garvey said the goal for the project is to transform the western portion of the Cultural District into a walking district where visitors can centrally park, accommodating museum traffic as well as providing customers for neighborhood businesses.

The key to the project, Garvey said, is the museum.

“Museum Place will absolutely compliment what the museum has made of the Cultural District,” he said.

H. Reece Pettigrew, chief financial officer of Jagee Holdings LLP, said the amount of traffic the area sees on a daily basis is astounding. The nearby University of North Texas Health Science Center, he said, sees a population of about 3,500 every day.

“If you add together the number of people who come to the UNT Health Science Center with the number of rodeo and cutting events and the museum visitors in the Cultural District, you won’t have to ask why this is a good spot to build,” Pettigrew said with a smile. “This land is prime and it will only get better as we develop.”

Garvey said his vision is to add connectivity to the Cultural District that does not exist currently. Plans call for the re-opening of Sixth Street as a thoroughfare for area visitors.

The 11 acres will be developed in four phases. Pettigrew said Jagee has yet to begin working with local real estate professionals to lease the development’s space, but he expects to begin doing just that within the next few months.

Garvey said the first portion of Museum Place to be developed will be the A-1 Block, which includes a new post office with a nearby terrace for passersby. The area’s current post office, located at 3301 Darcy St., will be shut down and relocated to the triangular plot of land bound by Bailey and Sixth Streets and University Drive, Garvey said. The post office will be constructed on the land that currently houses the vacant Six Points Car Wash building.

“We know that this particular plot of land acts as the gateway to the Cultural District and we want to give the post office’s design and the look of the terrace the time they need to serve that post well,” Pettigrew added. “It’s taken some time to work it out with the post office and it will be the first new post office in Fort Worth in many years, so it’s special.”

Of the massive collection of residential development in Museum Place, Pettigrew said 95 percent will be rental, leaving only 5 percent for sale as condos and town homes.

Every building in the development will have ground floor retail with residential and office space in higher floors. Garvey said the mixed-use buildings will lend variety to the project and also provide for a steady flow of retail on every street. Some of the buildings will feature upper floors that are set back away from the streets to give the area an open feel. Sidewalks will also be wider than average to facilitate more activity, Garvey added.

“We wanted to make sure and have some of the buildings be set back from the street because we don’t want the buildings to overpower the streets – we want it to be free and open so people don’t feel boxed in,” Pettigrew said.

In the designated Plaza area, Pettigrew said the streets will be flush with the recreational area, causing the road to rise up so passing vehicles drive at the same level as the Plaza.

“The idea is to make it where everyone who passes through this area, whether they’re walking or driving, feels like things are a little slower-paced there,” he said. “It creates a better look and it gets people interacting, which is what the neighborhood feel is all about.”

Garvey said he hopes the Plaza will house a small, three- or four-picture theater, various retail spaces and multiple restaurants. The new theater will feature a refurbished version of the original sign that hung in front of the former Seventh Street Theater, which emptied in 2003. Garvey said the Associated Businesses of the Cultural District, a non-profit business organization in the Cultural District, rescued the sign when the building was torn down.

The two main parking structures in the development will be surrounded by retail, residential and office space, essentially hiding the parking garages from street view. Pettigrew said the structures are hidden to further promote active streets in Museum Place.

“You can see it on streets in downtown where there are parking garages, there is no life there. There is nothing to do on a street that is lined with a parking garage, so we are solving that problem by not having a garage face the street at all,” Pettigrew said.

The project will also be designed to accommodate a light rail system, which Garvey said would benefit the city in the future.

“The light rail system is a project that would have to be driven primarily by the city, but if they should decide to install such a system, we will be ready to accommodate it,” he said.

Despite several years of negotiations, Garvey said his company was unable to obtain the retail building in the 3200 block of Camp Bowie that houses Great Outdoors sandwich shop and other small stores. So, he said, he designed around it.

“It was our intent to purchase the building, but we were unable to reach an agreement,” Garvey said. “So we tried to design around it and realized that we didn’t need it.”

A hotel that will house at least 180 rooms is also included in Museum Place plans, though Garvey said like the rest of the office and residential space, the specific hotel vendor has yet to be determined.

Pettigrew said he and Garvey will ask the city to help with outdated water and sewer lines, which, in some cases, date back to the 1920s and 30s, but the time to present the project to the city has yet to be determined.

With at least one construction start by the end of this year, Garvey said he plans to have the project completed by 2010. Once online, Garvey said his company estimates $1 million per year in added sales taxes for the city in addition to an uncalculated amount in added property taxes. Garvey added that at completion, Museum Place will add about 2,500 jobs to the area.

“It will not just be a good project for us and a good project for those who live or will live in the area, the city will benefit,” Pettigrew added.

Garvey said specific designs for the planned post office should be released during the next 60 to 90 days.

“We are not in this to make a quick profit,” Garvey said. “We are Fort Worth folks making a long term investment in a part of our city, so yeah, it’s taken a bit longer than what we originally expected, but I don’t see that as bad. I see it as an opportunity to make sure things are done right.”

----------------------------

Article from the FW Business Press. I think this just reinforces how wonderful of a project this is going to be. Sounds like the goal is not to create some homogenized "chain" district by our musuems, rather it is to create a vibrant, local, community-organized neighborhood on one of the best plots of land in the entire state. Can't wait for it to be done!


#10 jefffwd

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 11:37 AM

QUOTE(Jonnyrules23 @ Apr 15 2006, 11:25 AM) View Post

Article from the FW Business Press. I think this just reinforces how wonderful of a project this is going to be. Sounds like the goal is not to create some homogenized "chain" district by our musuems, rather it is to create a vibrant, local, community-organized neighborhood on one of the best plots of land in the entire state. Can't wait for it to be done!


I couldn't agree more Jonny! Thanks for posting the article!!! wub.gif

#11 JSJ

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 02:08 PM

First -- I’d like to thank everyone who posts to the Forum. I can’t tell you how much I’ve learned from all of you since I discovered this website.

Second – I live a block south of West 7th off Virginia Place. I am so JAZZED by the Museum Project that I can’t wait for it to start! I have been watching the JaGee purchases with interest, particularly though this Forum.

I have lived in the neighborhood for over 15 years, so I don’t know how that compares with other folks who post who live in the area. One of the reasons my husband and I love it here is because we can walk to restaurants and shops on West 7th. We’re not spring chickens by any means, but we walk everywhere – to the Museums, Will Rogers, Camp Bowie, downtown, the River Bend Nature Area (incredible!!), yada, yada…

I was very happy to see that NCTCOG’s RTC recommended their sustainable development grant application. Getting this public money will hopefully lead to more local, state, and federal dollars.

I believe this project will enhance the area for those of us who walk, and help get others out of their cars.


#12 mmiller2002

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 04:28 PM

"Of the massive collection of residential development in Museum Place, Pettigrew said 95 percent will be rental, leaving only 5 percent for sale as condos and town homes."

Doesn't rental draw residents that aren't invested in the long-term interests of the neighborhood, with frequent turnover? It will be a nice playground while the renters do the "city thing" just like I bet the downtown stuff is. People have a short attention span when they don't own the property.

"Despite several years of negotiations, Garvey said his company was unable to obtain the retail building in the 3200 block of Camp Bowie that houses Great Outdoors sandwich shop and other small stores. So, he said, he designed around it."

Should we take bets on eminent domain if the project actually gets underway?


"Sounds like the goal is not to create some homogenized "chain" district by our musuems, ..."

That's the goal, but in the end, money will talk if chains are interested.


i.e. As you can tell, I'm a skeptic.

I like cool redevelopemnt, but I don't like trying to force too much into an area. Trying too hard always shows. I like the Montgomery Plaza thing, because its saving a building that's already there. Some of the development behind it is bland, but those chains are what the general public wants (although not the sophisticated taste of this forum).

#13 Fort Worthology

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 04:40 PM

QUOTE(Jonnyrules23 @ Apr 15 2006, 11:25 AM) View Post

Despite several years of negotiations, Garvey said his company was unable to obtain the retail building in the 3200 block of Camp Bowie that houses Great Outdoors sandwich shop and other small stores. So, he said, he designed around it.


YES!!! Thank goodness that beautiful little building is going to stay! I was really hoping it wouldn't get knocked down.

#14 John T Roberts

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 05:35 PM

There is no guarantee that 3204 Camp Bowie will stay. It is only designated Demolition Delay. This is one building that the owners should try to elevate to Historic & Cultural Landmark status because it is only one of two similar buildings in the city. The other retail strip is at the northwest corner of Henderson and Pennsylvania and it is owned by Harris Hospital, so it is equally threatened by possible demolition for hospital expansion.

#15 mmiller2002

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 08:03 PM

Could someone point me to the FW definition of "Demolition Delay?"
I have tried a search.
Thanks

#16 John T Roberts

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 09:27 PM

Below are the criteria for nomination of a building for Highly Significant Endangered, Historic and Cultural Landmark, or Demolition Delay:

D. General Criteria for Designation
The criteria to be applied in order to determine whether sites or structures qualify for designation as Highly Significant Endangered, Historic and Cultural Landmark, Historic and Cultural Landmarks District and Demolition Delay are as follows:
1. Is distinctive in character, interest or value; strongly exemplifies the cultural, economic, social, ethnic or historical heritage of the City of Fort Worth, State of Texas or the United States.
2. Is an important example of a particular architectural type or specimen in the City of Fort
Worth.
3. Has been identified as the work of an important architect or master builder whose individual work has contributed to the development of the City of Fort Worth.
4. Embodies elements of architectural design, detail, materials or craftsmanship which represent a significant architectural innovation.
5. Bears an important and significant relationship to other distinctive structures, sites or areas, either as an important collection of properties of architectural style or craftsmanship with few intrusions, or by contributing to the overall character of the area according to a plan based on architectural, historic or cultural motif.
6. Possesses significant archeological value, which has produced or is likely to produce data affecting theories of historic or prehistoric interest.
7. Is the site of a significant historic event.
8. Is identified with a person or persons who significantly contributed to the culture and development of the City of Fort Worth, State of Texas or the United States.
9. Represents a resource, whether natural or man-made, which greatly contributes to the character or image of a defined neighborhood or community area.
10. Is designated as a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark or State Archeological Landmark, or is included on the National Register of Historic Places.



Here is some information about designation of Demolition Delay:

G. Designation as Demolition Delay (“DD”)
1. Designation. A structure may be designated Demolition Delay if it satisfies one or more
of the following qualifications:
a. Designated as a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark;
b. Designated as a Texas State Archeological Landmark;
c. Designated as an American Civil Engineering Landmark;
d. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places; or
e. It meets two or more of the criteria set out in Paragraph D above, and is identified as
a resource within a defined survey district of the historic resources survey or within
a Targeted Plan Area adopted by the City of Fort Worth.
2. Designation of Demolition Delay Property as Highly Significant Endangered or Historic and Cultural Landmark.
a. Owners of structures designated Demolition Delay who have filed an application for a Certificate of Appropriateness for demolition are subject to a delay in issuance of the permit of up to 180 days. It is the governing body’s intent that owners of such property who have sought a Certificate of Appropriateness for demolition shall not be frustrated in their efforts to demolish or sell such property by extension of the
delay period through nomination of property designated Demolition Delay as Highly Significant Endangered or Historic and Cultural Landmark.
b. Accordingly, if an owner of a structure designated Demolition Delay has filed an application for a Certificate of Appropriateness for demolition or if a demolition permit has been issued to an owner of such structure within the preceding three year period, such structure shall not be nominated for designation as Historic and Cultural Landmark or Highly Significant Endangered. However, an area which includes such structure may be designated as a Historic and Cultural Landmarks District.



Best definition in the Fort Worth Zoning Ordinance of Demolition Delay:

d. Delay of Demolition of Demolition Delay Property: The Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission may not deny an application for a Certificate of Appropriateness for demolition of property designated or pending designation as Demolition Delay. However, the Certificate of Appropriateness may provide that issuance of a demolition permit may be delayed for up to 180 days after submission of the application in order to permit the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission, City staff, local preservation groups and other interested parties to explore alternatives to demolition or relocation with the owner and persons or entities who have executed a purchase contract or option contract for the purchase of the property, or their representatives. The delay period, which shall not exceed 180 days, shall commence on the date on which an application for a Certificate of Appropriateness is filed with the Historic Preservation Officer. In determining the length of any such delay, the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission shall consider whether delay of such Certificate of Appropriateness will cause unreasonable economic hardship to the owner. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this Section to the contrary, in no event shall issuance of a demolition permit for property designated or pending designation as Demolition Delay be delayed for more than 180 days after submission of an application for a Certificate of Appropriateness.
5. Consultation Concerning Alternatives During Delay Periods. During any period for which demolition has been delayed, the owner, all persons or entities who have executed a sales contract or option contract for purchase of the property and the developer, or their representatives, shall meet with the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission and City staff, in consultation with local preservation groups and interested parties, in order to explore any alternatives to demolition or relocation which may provide economically
viable uses for the structure or property. The burden shall be on the City to recommend a plan to alleviate the unreasonable economic hardship. City staff shall assist the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission and the owner by performing the studies required to develop a viable alternative plan. Such plan may include, but is not limited to, property tax relief, loans or grants from public or private resources, acquisition of the property by purchase or eminent domain, building code modifications, changes in applicable Zoning Ordinance provisions, including a transfer of development rights, or a variance from provisions of the Zoning Ordinance, to allow reasonable beneficial use of the structure or property. At the end of any delay period, if a suitable alternative plan acceptable to the owner has not been approved by the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission, the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission shall issue the Certificate
of Appropriateness for demolition or relocation.


The entire Historic Preservation section can be downloaded as a part of the Zoning Ordinance from the City of Fort Worth's web site.






#17 redhead

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 10:01 PM

I have said on other threads that the rental/for sale issue is frequently more a matter of financing than the actual end product. In fact, projects are frequently started as rental (like T&P) and then some subsyantial shifts in the market occur---like the Tower sells out, and all of a sudden the project takes a different focus. Even if they build it as apartments, they may be designed for future condo conversion...I would not hold my breath on "rental" in the long term.

Secondly, this council will not take the plunge on ED for a private developer...that's like heresy right now. So I think you can wipe that notion away---ain't gonna' happen!!!

#18 vjackson

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 08:57 AM

QUOTE(mmiller2002 @ Apr 15 2006, 05:28 PM) View Post

I like cool redevelopemnt, but I don't like trying to force too much into an area. Trying too hard always shows. I like the Montgomery Plaza thing, because its saving a building that's already there. Some of the development behind it is bland, but those chains are what the general public wants (although not the sophisticated taste of this forum).



I don't consider my tastes sophisticated. And I don't necessarily have a problem with the stores in MP. FW has never been known as a great shopping city like Dallas, so I guess those typical stores are what to be expected. I just thought MP was going to lure in some retail that would be new to the FW area. It's the design of the center I and others have a problem with. I've seen several of the retailers in MP build more urban style stores in other cities, why not FW??? W7th is supposed to become an urban gateway into the Cultural District and the developers throw up something right out of Arlington. I'm curious to see how that SO7 development turn out also. I'm curious to see what kind of retail ends up there.

#19 cjyoung

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Posted 17 April 2006 - 02:59 PM

QUOTE(vjackson @ Apr 17 2006, 09:57 AM) View Post

QUOTE(mmiller2002 @ Apr 15 2006, 05:28 PM) View Post

I like cool redevelopemnt, but I don't like trying to force too much into an area. Trying too hard always shows. I like the Montgomery Plaza thing, because its saving a building that's already there. Some of the development behind it is bland, but those chains are what the general public wants (although not the sophisticated taste of this forum).



I don't consider my tastes sophisticated. And I don't necessarily have a problem with the stores in MP. FW has never been known as a great shopping city like Dallas, so I guess those typical stores is what to be expected. I just thought MP was going to lure in some retail that would be new to the FW area. It's the design of the center I and others have a problem with. I've seen several of the retailers in MP build more urban style stores in other cities, why not FW??? W7th is supposed to become an urban gateway into the Cultural District and the developers throw up something right out of Arlington. I'm curious to see how that SO7 development turn out also. I'm curious to see what kind of retail ends up there.


I don't like or dislike the MP, I'm just glad it's not empty. sleep.gif

It's kinda hard to get urban developments built when Dallas companies are the gateways for many national retailers into Fort Worth. Dallas wants to be LA and they want us to be Orange County. dry.gif

#20 John T Roberts

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 04:12 AM

A new rendering has now appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram article on the project. From the Carter Museum, this new building covers everything in the skyline from the Fort Worth Club Tower to part of Burnett Plaza. If three more buildings were given variances to built this tall or taller, the entire skyline would be covered up except for the tops of the 5 tallest.

Here's the article and a difficult to see rendering:
http://www.dfw.com/m...ss/14376406.htm

#21 fwpcman

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 10:15 AM

I think that this last past needs to be moved over to the 16 story condo thread. The Museum Place is a completely different project.

#22 David Love

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 03:09 PM

Tower developer joins Museum Place's team
By SANDRA BAKER
STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER

TONY LANDRUMFORT WORTH -- Tony Landrum, the developer who took a 37-story tornado-ravaged office building in downtown Fort Worth and transformed it into a $72 million luxury condominium tower, has joined the development team for Museum Place, the 11-acre urban village planned for West Seventh Street and University Drive.

Landrum, who heads TLCurban, a commercial real-estate developing and investment firm, joins forces with Richard Garvey, president of Museum Place Development Group, the men said Monday. Garvey owns JaGee Real Properties, which for the past few years has been buying the land needed for the project. JaGee has been primarily involved in developing shopping centers and industrial parks.

Landrum will serve as master developer and be responsible for all aspects of the development, including obtaining financing and hiring general contractors. His experience and track record lends the team a top-flight name to boost investor confidence.

Mark Wolfe, of James, Harwick + Partners architectural firm in Dallas, has been named architect of record for the development, Garvey said. The firm worked with JaGee on initial design concepts and land-use plans for Museum Place, but it was recently selected in a search of several architecture firms, Garvey said.

Museum Place will stretch from University Drive to Boland Street and Camp Bowie Boulevard to Sixth Street. The $150 million planned development will be built during the next five years near the city's museums in the Cultural District.

It will have buildings for 500 residential units, office and retail space, and a 180-room hotel.

"We have moved past the concept and into design, and that's exciting," Garvey said. "Tony is a good, broadly experienced developer, and he seems like a really good fit. Our relationship with JH + P has been very good. They're a good-size firm with good, creative people."

Landrum said he was attracted to Museum Place because of its size and the mix of office, retail and residential space.

"I want to create an environment that people want to be in," Landrum said.

Landrum's first task will be the construction of a multistory office, condo and retail building on Seventh Street, between Bailey Avenue and Barden Street. About 80,000 square feet of office space is planned, but that could increase, Garvey said.

Construction will start in the first quarter of 2007, Garvey said.

Before working on The Tower, which also has retail and office space, Landrum developed Chase Tower, the 12-story office building at Fourth and Throckmorton streets. He also handled the mixed-use urban redevelopment of Plaza of the Americas in Dallas.

James, Harwick + Partners has been involved in mixed-used developments across the country.

Locally, it was involved in The Block in Richardson and Cityville Fitzhugh in Dallas, according to the company's Web site.


Better Business Bureau:  A place to find or post valid complaints for auto delerships and maintenance facilities. (New Features) If you have a valid gripe about auto dealerships, this is the place to voice it.


#23 cberen1

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 08:54 PM

This has to be a huge boost for the credibility of the project. I was wondering when Tony's name would surface on something else. I was kind of hoping it would be downtown, but this is a great project, IMHO.

#24 hannerhan

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 06:40 AM

http://museumplace.com/

Just a shell so far, but I figured I would post it.

#25 ashivone

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:32 PM

Partner in Museum Place will be a Tenant


FORT WORTH -- Local general contractor Thos. S. Byrne will not only build and be a partner in the first building in the $150 million Museum Place development; the company will be the first tenant.

Thos. S. Byrne has signed a letter of intent to lease 20,000 square feet of office space in the eight-story building planned for the corner of West Seventh Street and Bailey Avenue, said Richard Garvey, developer of Museum Place, an 11-acre urban village planned for the gateway to the city's Cultural District. The space will replace the Byrne offices at Summit Avenue and 10th Street, where the company has about 8,000 square feet of space.

Thos. S. Byrne will be the general contractor and an equity partner in the 180,300-square-foot building. In addition to about 80,000 square feet for offices, the structure will have space for shops and restaurants at the street level and as many as 18 condominiums on the upper three floors.

Construction is scheduled to begin in January and take 14 to 15 months to complete.

Garvey said Byrne's lease is "a tremendous boost" for the development.

"We look forward to not only having Byrne as our first tenant, but working with them as a partner on the construction of the building," Garvey said in a statement.

John Avila, president and chief executive of Thos. S. Byrne, agreed that the partnership "is a great match."

"Because of our successful growth in the past decade, the timing was perfect to find a new location," Avila said.

The company, founded in 1923, has been involved in several local high-profile projects, including most recently the renovation of the former Montgomery Ward property on West Seventh Street into Montgomery Plaza.

It also worked on the Pier 1 Imports headquarters near downtown.

Museum Place is being developed by Museum Place Development, an affiliate of JaGee Holdings in Fort Worth, and TLCurban, headed by Tony Landrum.

In the next five years, Museum Place will grow to have about 500 residential units, a 180-room hotel, a small cinema and office, retail and condo space.

#26 vjackson

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 07:24 AM

A small cinema???? Could that possibly mean an arthouse theatre like Angelika or Magnolia????

#27 cberen1

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 07:39 AM

QUOTE(ashivone @ Jul 13 2006, 09:32 PM) View Post


The space will replace the Byrne offices at Summit Avenue and 10th Street, where the company has about 8,000 square feet of space.



I hope this prompts some better use for their existing property. Clear the block and build something interesting. Although I suspect they will simply lease it to a doctor.


#28 Now in Denton

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 11:06 AM

QUOTE(cberen1 @ Jul 14 2006, 08:39 AM) View Post

QUOTE(ashivone @ Jul 13 2006, 09:32 PM) View Post


The space will replace the Byrne offices at Summit Avenue and 10th Street, where the company has about 8,000 square feet of space.



I hope this prompts some better use for their existing property. Clear the block and build something interesting. Although I suspect they will simply lease it to a doctor.



From the Fort Worth weekly renderings. Many BLOCKS will be cleared for new development. Its good we have someone in charge that has already done projects doing this.

#29 JBB

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:09 PM

The block that cberen is talking about is downtown. It will not be cleared as part of this project.

#30 cberen1

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 01:32 PM

QUOTE(JBB @ Jul 14 2006, 01:09 PM) View Post

The block that cberen is talking about is downtown. It will not be cleared as part of this project.


I thought it would be a nice follow-up project.

#31 RD Milhollin

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 06:21 PM

QUOTE(cberen1 @ Jul 14 2006, 08:39 AM) View Post

I hope this prompts some better use for their existing property. Clear the block and build something interesting. Although I suspect they will simply lease it to a doctor.


I would rather see someone develop the many blocks of paved surface already existing. Can't we have some sort of moratorium on tearing things down until we get some new buildings up? It seems we have demolished a lot of buildings in the central city this year already.

#32 cberen1

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 07:22 AM

QUOTE(Prairie Pup @ Jul 14 2006, 07:21 PM) View Post

It seems we have demolished a lot of buildings in the central city this year already.


Dynamite. Blow it up.

#33 hooked

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 07:47 AM

Or maybe for our next forum get-together, we could all meet there with sledge hammers and crowbars and take out some of our frustrations. rotflmao.gif


I wish we had smiley with a hammer.

#34 Sam Stone

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 11:05 AM

I hear some dirt work has begun. Pictures anyone?

#35 Nitixope

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 11:25 AM

QUOTE(ashivone @ Jul 13 2006, 09:32 PM) View Post

Partner in Museum Place will be a Tenant
The company, founded in 1923, has been involved in several local high-profile projects, including most recently the renovation of the former Montgomery Ward property on West Seventh Street into Montgomery Plaza.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Thos Byrne do the Kimball? They interviewed the PM on "My Architect."


#36 Urbndwlr

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 06:03 PM

QUOTE(Nitixope @ Jul 24 2006, 12:25 PM) View Post

QUOTE(ashivone @ Jul 13 2006, 09:32 PM) View Post

Partner in Museum Place will be a Tenant
The company, founded in 1923, has been involved in several local high-profile projects, including most recently the renovation of the former Montgomery Ward property on West Seventh Street into Montgomery Plaza.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Thos Byrne do the Kimball? They interviewed the PM on "My Architect."


I believe you are correct (that they were the contractor), but your spelling of the museum's name is off. It is spelled Kimbell.


#37 John T Roberts

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 07:55 PM

Kimbell Art Museum statistics:

Design Architect: Louis Kahn
Associate Architect: Preston M. Geren Associates
Contractor: Thos. S. Byrne

#38 Nitixope

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 11:26 AM

QUOTE(Urbndwlr @ Jul 24 2006, 07:03 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Nitixope @ Jul 24 2006, 12:25 PM) View Post

QUOTE(ashivone @ Jul 13 2006, 09:32 PM) View Post

Partner in Museum Place will be a Tenant
The company, founded in 1923, has been involved in several local high-profile projects, including most recently the renovation of the former Montgomery Ward property on West Seventh Street into Montgomery Plaza.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Thos Byrne do the Kimball? They interviewed the PM on "My Architect."


I believe you are correct (that they were the contractor), but your spelling of the museum's name is off. It is spelled Kimbell.


My bad...you can probably tell that I'm not from these parts.

#39 Thurman52

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 09:00 PM

QUOTE(Sam Stone @ Jul 24 2006, 12:05 PM) View Post

I hear some dirt work has begun. Pictures anyone?


I don't think dirt is flying yet. I was under the impression we won't see progress unil late Fall.

#40 renamerusk

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 06:26 PM

QUOTE(Nitixope @ Jul 25 2006, 12:26 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Urbndwlr @ Jul 24 2006, 07:03 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Nitixope @ Jul 24 2006, 12:25 PM) View Post

QUOTE(ashivone @ Jul 13 2006, 09:32 PM) View Post

Partner in Museum Place will be a Tenant
The company, founded in 1923, has been involved in several local high-profile projects, including most recently the renovation of the former Montgomery Ward property on West Seventh Street into Montgomery Plaza.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Thos Byrne do the Kimball? They interviewed the PM on "My Architect."


I believe you are correct (that they were the contractor), but your spelling of the museum's name is off. It is spelled Kimbell.


My bad...you can probably tell that I'm not from these parts.


Its okay Nix..higher grade levels than yourself make the same misspelling mistake..http://www.doraltesoro.com/

#41 mosteijn

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 04:04 PM

QUOTE(Thurman52 @ Jul 25 2006, 10:00 PM) View Post

QUOTE(Sam Stone @ Jul 24 2006, 12:05 PM) View Post

I hear some dirt work has begun. Pictures anyone?


I don't think dirt is flying yet. I was under the impression we won't see progress unil late Fall.

Well, the 8 story mixed-use building will start in January, but the Post Office was supposed to be built sooner. I'm going to try to check out the area tomorrow.

#42 ashivone

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 05:00 PM

^^^^^^^
I went to a wedding in Conneticut in June and I met the son of the architects (I think it is a husband and wife team) who is designing the museum place post office. He told me that their first design was rejected by the design board and that they were still in the process of finishing the new design. That is porbably why construction has been delayed.

#43 hannerhan

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 08:10 AM

Anyone heard updates recently? There haven't been any changes to the website recently. I think this is the most interesting FW project in the works right now, and I'm itching to see the dirt fly.

#44 Thurman52

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 03:21 PM

I saw a sign for the project where the theater that was torn down on Friday. Same renderings we have been seeing on other publications.

#45 JBB

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 04:15 PM

There's also a sign up on Camp Bowie near Backwoods.

#46 Thurman52

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 10:19 AM

A few variances requested by the developer for encrouchment into the set-back on select lots was presented Wednesday before the Board of Adjustment, I assume all went well?

I am guessing getting required approvals is a sign they are making progress?

#47 PPoole

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 10:47 AM

QUOTE(Thurman52 @ Nov 5 2006, 10:19 AM) View Post

A few variances requested by the developer for encrouchment into the set-back on select lots was presented Wednesday before the Board of Adjustment, I assume all went well?

I am guessing getting required approvals is a sign they are making progress?


Board of Adjustment allowed the onstreet parking and the sidewalks to be entirely on city right of way which set the required set back with too shallow distance. A technicality to be waived. Working drawings are nearly complete and construction on this block and the post office to start in January.

#48 mosteijn

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 04:25 PM

I noticed that the website has been updated, looks good! I especially like the updated rendering of the corner office building:

IPB Image

#49 McHand

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 08:20 AM

Another informative Fort Worth Weekly article:

http://www.fwweekly....sp?article=4361


Some are worried the developers won't respect the culture in a cultural district....any chance we could see a move to the South Side by those types (club owners, artsy folks...)? Would be a shot in the arm for this area.

Voice & Guitars in The Crystal Furs
Elementary Music Specialist, FWISD

Texas Wesleyan 2015
Shaw-Clarke NA 


#50 jefffwd

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 09:48 AM

QUOTE(avenuebabe @ Nov 10 2006, 10:20 AM) View Post

Another informative Fort Worth Weekly article:

http://www.fwweekly....sp?article=4361


Some are worried the developers won't respect the culture in a cultural district....any chance we could see a move to the South Side by those types (club owners, artsy folks...)? Would be a shot in the arm for this area.



I think it is time for a Crate & Barrel in Funkytown!





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Cultural District, Museum Place, W. 7th Street

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