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Demolition of the Landmark Tower (380 ft., 420 with clock)


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#1 eastfw76

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Posted 16 May 2004 - 12:07 PM

I have it on very good authority from a member of XTO Energy management that Landmark Tower will brought down and some other building of sorts along with a parking garage will be put in its place. I was told that the building would be torn down floor by floor until it stands about 15 stories tall - at which point it will be imploded. Don't know any of the details regarding the new construction for the site or when demolition will begin.

#2 salvag

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Posted 16 May 2004 - 01:10 PM

Wow, that's major news, but I'm glad to hear it. Atleast the land will be put to use instead of just sitting idle... not to mention being an eyesore.

#3 DaPanther84

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Posted 16 May 2004 - 03:14 PM

thats sad news to me because they may not replace that building with a tall skyscraper and i was really looking foward to seeing a new clock on the top of that building. that declines the skyline if you ask me.

#4 Dismuke

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Posted 17 May 2004 - 12:31 AM

Has anyone here ever been inside the building? If so, what is it like? I have looked in the ground floor window some while back so that much I have seen. What are the upper floors like? Do they have a very 1950s appearance? Or are they mostly non-descript and bland?
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#5 Doug

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Posted 17 May 2004 - 10:29 PM

Dismuke,
As I recall, bland would be a compliment. The hallways seemed cold and boring. This is speaking form the early 60's when we used to run/walk up the stairs periodically. At he time the 30th floor was completely unfinished and it afforded a 360 deg. view. They had a cafeteria on maybe the 17th floor to break the monotony of at least that floor.

#6 normanfd

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 12:03 AM

I've been in the building before. It emodied everything typical and unmemorable of 60s architecture.

#7 Dismuke

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 12:05 AM

Thanks for your recollection, Doug.

If it is true that it is coming down, I think it is kind of sad - primarily for the reason DaPanther gave about it removing height from the skyline.

As to the building itself - well, I have very mixed feelings about it. I remember when I visited and explored downtown Fort Worth about a year or so before I moved here seeing the building and thinking "gee, how ugly." Part of the building looked like it was actually rusting. Not knowing much at the time about Fort Worth's history, I also wondered if it was perhaps an early 20th century skyscraper that somebody came along and covered up with ugly panels as was done with the Praetorian Building in Dallas.

In some respects, apart from its decay, I think the building looked better on the skyline in recent decades than it did when it was new. I have seen photos of the skyline shortly after it was completed and thought how incongruous and ugly it looked in contrast to rest of the skyscrapers which were all built in the late '20s or earlier. However, with the addition of the all-glass skyscrapers in the '70s and '80s, the building does not stick out like such a sore thumb and provides a bit of contrast.

I only vaguely remember the clock on the rare visits to Fort Worth I made with my parents when I was a kid. Somebody actually got the thing to work for a brief period around the time I moved to Fort Worth in 1990. By that time the CNB letters had been replaced with an "Empire of America" sign. I can't say that I was ever very impressed by the clock - but that could simply be because of my age. When I was growing up, digital clocks were all the rage and digital watches were very popular. To me, digital clocks look cheap and commonplace. On the other hand, back in the 1950s, they were rare and I am sure that the clock must have been quite a novelty and probably looked very futuristic to people.

I think it is interesting to compare and contrast the Landmark Tower with the original Republic Bank Building (the one with the rocket ship tower on top) in Dallas. The two buildings are of a similar style in that they both have aluminum facades and a certain 1950s "futuristic" look to them. The Republic Bank Building is actually 3 years older than Landmark. But notice the dramatic difference in how each building has aged. Landmark Tower has always looked tired and ragged in the 14 years I have been in the city and I am sure it probably did for several years before that as well. The Republic Bank Building held up remarkably well even before the complex was redeveloped in the late '90s. Landmark looks more than just dated (being dated is not necessarily a bad thing); it looks obsolete. The Republic Bank Building has a certain timeless quality about it and I think is one of if not the best 1950s skyscrapers I have seen. Even in pictures from its hey day, Landmark tower looks very low budget compared to Republic Bank. The Republic rocket ship tower is still very impressive. If the Landmark Tower clock were to be rebuilt and duplicated back to its original condition, it would look somewhat clunky and primitive by modern standards.

My point is that, even by 1950s skyscraper standards, Landmark Tower was not all that remarkable a building. Still, it is the only one of its kind that Fort Worth has so, for me, that would make its possible demise somewhat sad. But I can't blame XTO if they do decide to get rid of it.

And as far as ugly eyesores that need to be removed from the skyline go, Landmark Tower, even in its present condition, does not hold the top spot. The "honor" for that goes to the Southwestern Bell Building.
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#8 tcole

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 06:25 AM

Dis:

I walked every floor in 1990 to do a tennant survey (very few with the exception of the first few floors). The finish-out as I recal was indeed very periodic, but more so that represented early 1970s style than the period of the buildings construction. One interesting space of note was that there was one suite in the upper floors that was designed with a stairwell over a fountain.

#9 Hannerhan

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Posted 20 May 2004 - 06:20 AM

I walked through the building about 4 years ago, and went up to the 28th floor. This was when the previous owner was saying they were about to start construction on the condos. It was all in really bad condition, and the 70's interior needed to be completely replaced. The place was the shambles generally.

#10 Willy1

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Posted 21 May 2004 - 05:06 PM

Well, I know it's an eye sore, but I'm really sad to see the building come down since Fort Worth only has 6 buildings that are 30 stories or more in the entire city. This will reduce the number of skyscrapers with 30 or more stories to just 5. That's pathetic for a city of Fort Worth's caliber. The city we are most compared with these days is Charolette, NC. And, the skyline in Charolette beats FW's pretty hands down. It's taller, it has both old and new buildings, and there are more of them. I wish FW would build some impresssive buildings downtown. The buildings of any significant height that we do have are boring and boxy. I would love to see a signature tower with a pointed spire on top - think Chrysler Tower in NYC. Or, even something that mirrors the shape/outline of the Tower at the Will Rogers Complex. I love the art deco look of that tower. Hopefully, the city will retain the title as the fastest growing city in the nation long enough to spur some other vertical development - maybe in the area between the new Pier 1 and the CBD. I still also stick to my wishes for a Space Needle like structure in FW. I really hoped the Landmark Tower would see a renovation, not demolition.

#11 eastfw76

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Posted 21 May 2004 - 10:14 PM

There may be hope, Willy. We still don't know what's going in the place of Landamark Tower. Though I'd assume it would be nothing near as tall as Landmark, XTO is a big and evergrowing company and might just like to put their stamp on the skyline... We'll see. My source tells me that we're about a year out from seeing Landmark come down, though.

#12 John T Roberts

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Posted 03 June 2004 - 07:48 AM

The storm from Tuesday night blew more of the aluminum panels off of the exterior of the building. This was the first time that XTO has dealt with that problem. When they purchased the building, one of the first things they did was secure all of the panels to keep this from happening.

#13 cjyoung

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Posted 03 June 2004 - 10:15 AM

Willy1:

You and I are in total agreement about Fort Worth and Charlotte. The difference is that Charlotte anchors their area and we play second fiddle (I hate that).

Hopefully, the current tide will continue and we will get some skyline altering construction soon.

Peace

<_<

#14 JOCOguy

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Posted 04 June 2004 - 04:43 PM

Has anyone here ever been inside the building? If so, what is it like? I have looked in the ground floor window some while back so that much I have seen. What are the upper floors like? Do they have a very 1950s appearance? Or are they mostly non-descript and bland?

I rember as a child going up to the 17th floor cafeteria. I remember the ceilings being very low in the hallways. My mother and I sat on the part facing the south side and watched the arena on TCCC being built.

I will be very sad to see it go. <_<

#15 JimmyR

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Posted 06 June 2004 - 10:47 PM

Personally I have never been inside of the Landmark Tower, howver growing up visiting Fort Worth, I was always amazed at the walkway up high that use to connecting to the neighboring building. Was that walkway higher than average or was that just from me being a small kid? Does anyone have photographs of the walkway? I have some memory of the clock on top keeping time. I knew I was in Fort Worth when I saw the clock, and that little blue flame that was also on top of a building. I'll hate to see the tower come down myself because it is a mark on the skyline, but who knows.

I remember back when they were planning to tear down The Tower, and I was thinking one day, what would someone driving through Fort Worth on the interstate, possibly never have been there before, and not aware of the impending demolition of the former Bank One Tower, suddenly, when its imploded, they saw it crumbling down.
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#16 ghughes

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Posted 07 June 2004 - 04:50 AM

What a concept! Putting myself in that situation, I can imagine being quite freaked out.

#17 John T Roberts

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Posted 19 June 2004 - 12:32 PM

The Indian Mural on the side of the building was removed this week due to weather damage. Slowly, but surely, this building is being demolished one piece at a time by acts of nature!

#18 mosteijn

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Posted 22 June 2004 - 12:44 PM

Or maybe by force as well...but I'm sure you wouldn't know what's going to happen to the building, would you John??? :frown:

#19 John T Roberts

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Posted 22 June 2004 - 09:25 PM

Let me just put it this way. I keep secrets from you. :frown: :swg:

#20 David Love

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 11:11 AM

Posted on Thu, Sep. 23, 2004

Creditors to get insurance money in Landmark Tower case

By Sandra Baker

Star-Telegram Staff Writer


FORT WORTH - Creditors in a bankruptcy case against the former owner of downtown's Landmark Tower may be paid from a $7.4 million insurance settlement reached in a civil lawsuit over coverage for damage the building sustained in the March 2000 tornado.

According to a motion filed this week in the proceeding in federal bankruptcy court in Fort Worth, the trustee and the petitioning creditors initiated settlement talks with Boston-based Lexington Insurance Co. about four weeks ago and recently reached an agreement.


The settlement is the only remaining asset of FWTX Building, which is owned by Scott Christensen of New Cannan, Conn. FWTX bought the building in 1996 and was never able to fulfill plans to turn the office tower into a residential high-rise.


"I have no reason to oppose the settlement," Christensen said Thursday. "I'm very happy that all the creditors will get paid close to a large percentage of what they're owed."


The 30-story Landmark Tower, once known as the Texas Building, 200 W. Seventh St., was sold to XTO Energy of Fort Worth for $5.5 million in a trustee sale in January.


Proceeds from that sale went to the Miami financial institution that loaned Christensen the money to buy the building.


To date, there are 18 creditors who have filed claims totaling $4.3 million. The number of creditors likely will rise before an Oct. 13 deadline to file claims.


A court hearing is scheduled for Oct. 14 on the trustee's motion to accept the insurance settlement and pay creditors.


FWTX Building was involuntarily placed in Chapter 7 bankruptcy in February, one month after a bankruptcy judge dismissed FWTX Building from Chapter 11 protection because Christensen was unable to reorganize his business.


The move allowed creditors to seek civil judgments against FWTX Building's assets.

#21 Urbndwlr

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Posted 25 September 2004 - 01:01 AM

If replaced with a garage, how large would it be?

If I were developing that lot in this market (very tight downtown office market), I would add some spec office to the garage (at least 90,0000 SF on top of the garage) and retail on the ground floor.

Furthermore, I would design it so that few people knew most of the floors are parking. Charleston has several great examples of attractive parking garages.

#22 John T Roberts

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Posted 25 September 2004 - 06:51 AM

Urb, I think the answer to your question would be how large of a garage is needed at that location. Most of the one block garages in downtown that have been built recently have been between 10 and 15 levels. If you put 100,000 square feet of office space on top with 20,000 square feet on each floor, you have a building between 16 and 21 floors. It still would not rival the height of the Landmark Tower. You would have to put a significant sized office building on top to get a tower that was either 380 feet high as the building is now, or 420 feet high matching the height with the clock.

#23 mosteijn

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Posted 25 September 2004 - 10:05 AM

Speaking of tight office market, I just read somwhere that 97% of Carter & Burgess Plaza is leased. That's a million+ sf office building, and it's 97% leased. I'm sure Burnett Plaza's numbers are right up there too, and City Center with the new DR Horton lease isn't too far behind as well. When are people going to take a look at the extremely tight office market and see it as an opportunity to build something significant?

John, do you know how much space XTO has between the Baker Bldg. and W.T.?

#24 EricTCU

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Posted 28 September 2004 - 10:22 PM

Those leasing numbers surprise me Jonny! It seems to me there are signs for office space all over downtown! Perhaps it's the large buildings with good amenities that are full while the small older buildings (2 to 8 floors) are not adequate?

Is there a strong market for small business (5-50 employees) to lease these smaller buildings, or are large corporate / branch offices the trend?

I'm in the Life and Annuity business and most the small businesses I know of in Fort Worth stay outside of the CBD.

#25 Willy1

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Posted 29 September 2004 - 06:38 PM

I think you're right EricTCU, the signs are for small amounts of space which represent a small percentage of the downtown market.

So, going back to Johnny's point... how do large towers become reality - does a large company have to want to enter the CBD market to warrant a tower being built, or does someone just have to build the tower to attract new companies into the core? Is this a "which came first, the chicken or the egg" situation? Or, does the market demand typically have to exceed the 100% mark before towers start to be needed?

I've never really been in an industry that deals with that sort of thing so I am just curious how it all sort of comes together. You would think that as TIF happy as FW is right now, developers would be clammoring to build new skyscrapers in a city growing the way FW is... Anyone have any opinions or theories on why new large towers (40+ stories) aren't being considered in FW given the current growth rate?

#26 John T Roberts

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Posted 29 September 2004 - 09:12 PM

Jonny, the total Baker Building size should be easy to figure. The building is nearly square at 95' x 100' x 11 floors. That's 104, 500 s.f. gross. The usable square feet is significantly smaller.

The W.T. Waggoner Building's size is tougher because of the light well. That building is 75' x 95' with 20 floors.

#27 Shocker

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 08:19 PM

The FW Business Press that I looked at today has an article stating that the asbestos abatement is complete and the plans call for bringing down the building floor by floor from the top just as had been suspected. Should be interesting to watch.

#28 John T Roberts

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 08:27 PM

I was going to post this yesterday after I read the article, but it was not available online at the time. If you read the article, it states that XTO has not officially released anything.

Here's the link to the Business Press article:
http://www.fwbusines...ebath=&subname=

#29 mosteijn

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 10:50 PM

So, assuming demolition actually happens, downtown is going to loose a (albeit unattractive) part of its skyline. I really, REALLY hope XTO is feeling a bit frisky and decides to build something significant on the lot. A new tallest would look great in that specific location, but anything but a parking lot/retail-less garage would do.

#30 John T Roberts

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 11:02 PM

From what I can tell, XTO will probably build a building of maybe 20 stories. I would not look for the replacement building to be as tall as the Landmark Tower is, even without its clock.

#31 cberen1

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Posted 03 December 2004 - 08:47 AM

I don't know if I care how tall it is, as long as it is interesting and unique. Just not another brick box. It would be cool if they went art deco. If they plan the first couple of floors for consumer use, it could draw more foot traffic south of 6th street.

It's a shame if they don't implode the building. This is our last chance to blow something up for a while.

#32 Dismuke

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Posted 05 December 2004 - 11:22 PM

It's a shame if they don't implode the building.  This is our last chance to blow something up for a while.


Perhaps we could convince someone that the Southwestern Bell Building needs to be imploded. I know... wishful thinking.
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#33 cjyoung

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Posted 06 December 2004 - 09:15 AM

I'm with you Jonny. I would like to see a 225 meter ;) building go in that spot.

#34 Urbndwlr

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 01:17 AM

Well, I guess the guys who had the "chicken or egg" question about how new highrises get built. Usually office buildings are developed with a significant percentage pre-leased to a tenant with good credit. Developers will usually want to substantially lease their building within 1 year of completion (to approx 90-95%). In the Downtown Fort Worth market, you have a 10 million SF market, with around 10% vacancy (more like 5% in Class A space). The Downtown market has about 50,000-75,000 SF of positive net absorption per year (but that # is highly volatile). Historically the Downtown market has expanded slowly, but that might be changing.

Still, because of the moderate size of the market, developers will be reluctant to build any speculative buildings any larger than about 75,000 SF. So, they look for large tenants to become "lead" tenants in new buildings.

If XTO agreed to take 150,000 SF of office space at $25 plus electric per sf for 10 years, I think developers would be willing to construct a new building of up to around 250,000 - 300,000 SF and accept the leasing risk on the balance of the space. A new building will cannibalize tenants from older ones, so the main question is whether tenants in older, less expensive buildings will be willing to pay the premium rent required to justify the new development. The Bank One Building is quoting around $24 per SF I think - so that's probably the ballpark rate for new office space now (maybe higher now b/c of concrete and steel prices).

In my opinion, Downtown Fort Worth is experiencing a shift (increase) in demand due to the office market's (i.e. tenants) growing desire to locate down here.
I will bet that as firms consider their office locations in North Texas, a slightly higher percentage will consider Downtown Fort Worth, which will grow that modest annual absorption rate mentioned above. It's starting to get noticed -- it just takes a while for the improved quality of life to result in firms moving their offices.

#35 renamerusk

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 03:00 AM

In combination of the Landmark/suggested XTO skyscraper; and what I would like to see XTO do similarly in downtown Fort Worth with the Landmark block. I have posted a couple of photos of NYC's City Bank Farmers Building in Wall Street. Its the building with the white limestone crown and white limestone trimming; its 226m or 742ft tall (54 stories) and the one building I always look for when eyeing the Manhattan skyline. I think it is one of the loveliest skyscrapers in the world. I think such a building would ideally compliment the surrounding buildings in the SW sector of downtown.

By the way, I would be happy with any of the crowned buildings pictured; well with the exception of that 60'ish steel and glass building along the river.

http://www.wirednewy...rmers_trust.htm


"Keep Fort Worth Folksy & Art Deco-eeee!"

#36 Dismuke

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 11:37 AM

I have posted a couple of photos of NYC's City Bank Farmers Building in Wall Street.  Its the building with the white limestone crown and white limestone trimming; its 226m or 742ft tall (54 stories) and the one building I always look for when eyeing the Manhattan skyline.  I think it is one of the loveliest skyscrapers in the world.

View Post


Wow! That is a very impressive building - one that has somehow up to now escaped my attention. Thanks for posting the link.
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#37 Dismuke

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 11:56 AM

Here are some additional photos of the building that I found on the web:

http://www.emporis.c...id=115455&aid=8


Here is an elevation drawing that shows an entire side of the structure - something very difficult to capture in a photograph due to surrounding buildings.

http://www.geocities...ftcbuilding.htm


It would indeed be something if someone would put up a new building along similar lines here in Fort Worth. And a skyline like Fort Worth's is a good one to do it in as well as it would stand out more. Wouldn't it be great if something like that were built here and ended up being so well received that it sparked a new, nationwide Art Deco renaissance/revival movement?
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#38 John T Roberts

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 12:24 PM

The shot from the top of the WTC looks similar to what I have taken from over the years at that location. Dismuke, on my trips to NY, I have made notice of this building.

I doubt very seriously that XTO will build anything on the Landmark Tower site that is as tall as the building they are replacing. If I had to guess, I would say that the new building won't be any taller than 20 stories.

#39 mosteijn

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 12:41 PM

You know what I think would look nice there? A smaller version of the new 7WTC tower. Yeah, it's just a box, but it's one of the most elegant boxes I've ever seen. It would have to be slimmer too, because a full block 20 story building will look extremely squatty.

#40 Dismuke

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 12:43 PM

I doubt very seriously that XTO will build anything on the Landmark Tower site that is as tall as the building they are replacing.  If I had to guess, I would say that the new building won't be any taller than 20 stories.

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That would probably make sense given current market conditions. While it would be neat if such a building were built as Fort Worth's tallest since our current tallest skyscrapers are pretty bland, drab and sterile, a 20 story building done in a similar style would still be great. And one of the things that is nice about that style is, with its strong emphasis on the vertical, it gives buildings the appearance of being taller. And imagine how such a building would look lit up at night.
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#41 Urbndwlr

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 06:35 PM

The nice thing about vertically mixed-use projects (e.g. residential + office) is that the building could be designed with large floor plates on the lower floors with smaller ones above. Such small floors as those of the lower Manhattan building shown above wouldn't be feasible for contemporary office use. Smaller ones, such as 10 - 15,000 sf could, however, work as condos or apartments.

If the building was a residential over office it would just have two separate entrance lobbies.

#42 Willy1

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 06:57 PM

I'm frustrated by FW's skyline. I wish that we had more tall buildings. In all honesty, I don't think FW's skyline is spectaular at all. I think we have a hand full of great buildings, but most of them aren't visible from a distance because the great one's aren't tall. I think Pier One is a nice glass tower addition, but don't really consider it a "highrise". To me, 20 stories isn't much to get all that excited about. I think the most impressive thing about the P1 Place is the shape of the building and of course the lighting. I'm disappointed that XTO is going to tear down a 30 story building and replace it with something shorter... and probably boxy and boring. How many short rectangular-shaped buildings can/should one city have? The buildings that were build in the 1980's in FW helped raise the height of the skyline, but in my opinion, they weren't very creative when designing them. I wish we had somethings with a spiral roof on top to point toward the sky. I love the idea of a 700+ height building in FW... preferably in the center of the skyline to draw the eye skyward when looking at downtown. I think there are several improvements going on in our skyline - The Tower, P1Place, the new tops slated for the top of the Tandy Towers... But, I am frustrated that so much of the new development is low/midrise. Radio Shack is a really nice campus and I love the fountains and lights... but wish there was a more vertical element to the campus. I love the shape of tower at Will Rogers and I thnk it would be great if there were a large scale version (over 600 or 700 ft) of it represented in a new downtown skyscraper. I love the style of the tower and the overall shape of the top. Plus the lights at the top in addition to some great up/down lighting on the tower itself would really stand out against the night sky. I could almost visualize a big version of this tower next to the T&P Warehouse and serving as a skyline restaraunt/observation deck. The T&P Warehouse and new WR Tower could be used in combination to give FW and answer to Dallas' Hyatt Regency/Reunion Tower complex. Only, I would convert the Warehouse space into a mixed use facility with retail, residential, and possibly a small upscale hotel to serve the southern end of CBD and to provide a really solid anchor to the new Lancaster corridor - and of course give FW a new tallest and to raise the height and width of our skyline. Of course a tall building with dining and oberservation would also be pretty great around the new lake front north of the courthouse....

Just a little food for thought.

#43 Dismuke

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 07:55 PM

Such small floors as those of the lower Manhattan building shown above wouldn't be feasible for contemporary office use.  Smaller ones, such as 10 - 15,000 sf could, however, work as condos or apartments. 

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I did a bit of digging around the web for information on the City Bank Farmers Trust /20 Exchange Place Building and it turns out that the plans are to convert it from its existing use as office space into residential.
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#44 Dismuke

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 08:02 PM

I'm disappointed that XTO is going to tear down a 30 story building and replace it with something shorter... and probably boxy and boring.

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It is possible that might happen. On the other hand the people who run XTO obviously have very excellent taste when it comes to architecture and take an active interest in its architectural heritage - as evidenced by what they have done with the W.T. Waggoner and Baker Buildings. Indeed, part of their stated reason for buying the Landmark Tower - a building that is absolutely nothing but a financial liability - was because it was such a blight on downtown. With their track record to date, I just don't see them putting up some cheap generic building.

The buildings that were build in the 1980's in FW helped raise the height of the skyline, but in my opinion, they weren't very creative when designing them.


I agree completely. In fact, the 1980s buildings on the Fort Worth skyline look to me like something more typical of the 1970s. Look at some of the buildings that were added to the Dallas skyline in the 1980s - several of them are quite excellent. The ones that were put up in Fort Worth - well, I think Carter+Burgess is the best of the lot, but that's really not saying very much, is it?
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#45 John T Roberts

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 09:13 PM

Because all of the buildings that were completed in Fort Worth were done in the early 1980's, they actually were designed in the late 1970's. That is probably why they look like they were designed in that decade. Most of the buildings that look a little different that opened in Dallas during the 1980's were completed just a little later; therefore, they were probably designed in that decade.

#46 mosteijn

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 09:36 PM

With their track record to date,  I just don't see them putting up some cheap generic building.

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Absolutely! I hope whatever they build is expensive, out of the ordinary, and most importantly: Ultra-Modern. :smwink:

Seriously though, I would hate for them to waste an opportunity to make a future landmark by putting up a close interpertation of an old design. Buildings from the 1930's are great because they're from the 1930's, but this is 2004. Fort Worth has enough old buildings to still be charming, I think we can risk something current.

#47 DrkLts

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 10:48 PM

:smwink: How about all of us forum members join a lottery pool, wait till the prize is HUGE in the upper millions, and we just build the state's largest building! That's the most realistic thing to getting our wish it seems. lol

#48 cberen1

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 08:39 AM

It looks like demolition is about to get started in earnest. There was a ton of activity on the building this morning when I drove by. Lots of people and new equipment on the lot and inside the building from some demolition company.

#49 safly

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 10:47 AM

I don't know if it was me after a day of NFL boozing or hours of some good 3 alarm chili eating, but after my bar departure I noticed this HUGE overturning of earth right smack next to the Landmark's North wall. What gives? Must be something going on, and going on QUICKLY. This sucker ws HUGE, it looked like Superman had just landed uncontrollably, like he just got GALACTICLY "pimp slapped" by Gen. ZOD and somehow ended up in COWTOWN. biggrin.gif
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#50 John T Roberts

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 10:40 PM

Safly, they are now starting to do some serious demolition. They have torn holes in the north wall on the first floor, mezzanine, and in the basement. In order to open the basement out for removal of large items (if there are any left), they have excavated out a hole on the north side of the building in what was the parking lot. These large holes will allow for the removal of the debris from the building that must be cleared out for demolition.




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