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Trinity Bluffs

Uptown Samuels Avenue

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#51 David Love

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Posted 16 July 2004 - 12:47 PM

Does anyone know when we could expect to see something on the proposed TCC Trinity project?

#52 mosteijn

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Posted 16 July 2004 - 01:42 PM

I hope soon, my mom wants to get job as the librarian of the campus (assuming there will be a library). While not set in stone, if she does get that job and after I've graduated, her and my dad are considering moving to downtown, and then my dad could use the TRE to get to his job in Irving. I would love to come back and visit their condo someday... :)

#53 redhead

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Posted 11 August 2004 - 01:23 PM

Just an FYI---I realize everyone on this forum gets excited about new construction, but some of us enjoy demolition. Okay, it's a sickness but I really enjoy a great implosion. Sorry, I don't mean to tease you as nothing of that magnitude is happening, but I thought you might want to see the demolition of the Brooks-Baker building on Bluff Street. The windows, etc. are being removed and in the next few days, it will be gone. Please don't mourn its loss as I cannot say there was anything of architectural significance worth saving. In fact, it appears to have been built with surplus concrete overpass beams. Just an FYI for those of you who like to stay informed...

#54 AndyN

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Posted 11 August 2004 - 02:32 PM

FYI, Brookes Baker was a surveyor in Fort Worth since the late 1800s. Although it sounds like a partnership name, it is his full name and requires no hyphen. Great portions of Fort Worth and the surrounding countryside have been surveyed by Mr. Baker and his successors. In fact, they probably have more reference marks in downtown Fort Worth than any other survey company. The company has survey field notes in their files from when surveying was done by horse and includes descriptions of Indian attacks.


I noticed a construction trailer set up where the masonry building used to be at the intersection of Bluff and Elm. Looks like we'll be seeing construction start soon.
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#55 Dismuke

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Posted 12 August 2004 - 12:22 AM

Please don't mourn its loss as I cannot say there was anything of architectural significance worth saving.  In fact, it appears to have been built with surplus concrete overpass beams. Just an FYI for those of you who like to stay informed...

I was in downtown this evening and drove by to take a look. Gee - you are right: it is an ugly building and that is a very apt description.

Question: I ended up getting semi-lost for a brief bit on some of the streets back in there and suddenly came across what appeared to have once been an interesting looking wall (although it was dark at the time). It was located on the corner edges of a lot on the south side of Gounah Street one block east of Grant Avenue. Do you know anything about the history of that wall, how old it is and what sort of house once occupied the lot? I will have to drive by again and see if it looks as nice in the daylight.
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#56 AndyN

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Posted 12 August 2004 - 07:42 AM

If you remember my post on the old forum about the 3rd Ward Elementary School, this is the remnant of that site. Until a few months ago there was a FWISD maintenance building and yard there that NTHT, Inc. was trying to lease as a carbarn. I don't know if it would be practical to incorporate the wall into the development, but it is a neat wall dating from the late 1800s.

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#57 Dismuke

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Posted 12 August 2004 - 10:01 AM

I don't know if it would be practical to incorporate the wall into the development, but it is a neat wall dating from the late 1800s.

That or perhaps relocating it somewhere else would be very neat if practical.

By the way - did NTHT ever find a place to call home? I seem to vaguely recall that you had either found a place or were looking at a place - or maybe I am confusing it with something else.
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#58 mosteijn

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Posted 12 August 2004 - 12:20 PM

I can't wait for this to happen! I don't even care if there's no skyscrapers, because the effect this will have on the downtown residential market and the feeling of "uptown" is incredible. Thanks for keeping us posted, redhead.

#59 redhead

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Posted 12 August 2004 - 03:12 PM

Andy, you are totally corrrect about the wall, and that is probably the most significant historical element left. The third ward school replaced the original home for children of unwed mothers---mostly the prostitiutes that were employed along Samuels. As for the wall, I believe the intent is to save it, and if that's not possible I too, would hope that it could be moved and preserved.

If you're driving around the area, note the cut granite curb pieces on Bluff near Cummins and north on Cummins into the cul-de-sac. Also to the west on Bluff, between the Brooks Baker (no hyphen!) building and Cummins is the last remaining "carriage step" on the north side of the road. I have been told it will be removed during construction with the intention of returning it at a later date. Unfortunately the rest of these are long gone. It was for the ladies to stand on to step into their horse drawn carriages.

But alas, the construction trailer is for the school gym project across the street. The Trinity Bluff project is not yet finalized by the city but I have heard that all of that should be finalized by the end of this month and then you should start seeing some action.

#60 John T Roberts

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Posted 12 August 2004 - 04:13 PM

Redhead, I did drive through the area on Sunday and paid attention to the granite curb pieces, the carriage step, and the stone wall at the old school site. I think that it is good that those items will be preserved in some form. Several of the old Victorian homes in the city still have their carriage steps in place. What is going to become of the granite curbs?

#61 redhead

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Posted 13 August 2004 - 02:49 PM

John, I do not really know the answer. There has been discussion of pulling them up and maybe re-using them, but the infrastructure has to be replaced to current city specs. Given that, the pieces could only be used in some decorative way which has not been determined. Do have some thoughts on their use?

#62 redhead

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 04:35 PM

And the Brooks Baker building is GOING, GOING, not quite gone but in a heap of rubble that is disappearing. You might take a drive by and check out the view. One of the developer's concessions in keeping with the Trinity River Vision is to provide view corridors so you can actually see the river and the eventual lake. The view is especially nice at night.

#63 John T Roberts

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 04:41 PM

Redhead, sorry for the slow reply, but I do have a thought on those granite curbs. If they are not too badly damaged, couldn't they be used as curbs for private drives? Another idea might be to use them to define planting areas in landscaping and then put up a plaque that states where they came from and why they were salvaged.

#64 redhead

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 04:55 PM

I especially like the idea of using them as hard edges for planted areas...mmm...we'll have to give that to the powers-that be!

#65 AndyN

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 09:57 PM

In my conversations with Mr. Struhs, we discussed the area's similarity to the Uptown area of Dallas. Samuels Avenue is so much like what McKinney Avenue was 15-20 years ago. He mentioned looking at the development in Uptown and using it as a model for what he wanted to do. To that end, I saw a recent newspaper quote where he called the Samuels Avenue area the Fort Worth Uptown. It seems like they are going to make a conscious effort to rebrand the area as Uptown. Anyone have any thoughts on that? Good, bad, indifferent?

As for the original stone curbs from McKinney Avenue, I helped salvage them when the street was rebuilt. They are all stockpiled until someone figures out what to do with them. Like an iceberg, they are substantially larger beneath the ground than the +/-6 inches that you see.

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#66 normanfd

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 12:38 AM

In another thread, I posted how the name "Uptown" sounds too generic. The original Uptown is in New Orleans along Charles around Tulane and Loyola Universities. In New York City, the term is used directionally. Hence, subway travelers in Manhattan are directed to Uptown or Downtown platforms instead of northbound or southbound. In NYC, it is a relative term in that even a Harlem resident would describe a Washington Heights resident as living "Uptown".

It would not serve Fort Worth to have a part of town with the same name as a part of Dallas, especially in such a prominent location. It would be just too confusing, especially to visitors. I would suggest a name that features the location close to the Trinity River prominently.

#67 mosteijn

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 04:06 PM

In my conversations with Mr. Struhs, we discussed the area's similarity to the Uptown area of Dallas. Samuels Avenue is so much like what McKinney Avenue was 15-20 years ago. He mentioned looking at the development in Uptown and using it as a model for what he wanted to do. To that end, I saw a recent newspaper quote where he called the Samuels Avenue area the Fort Worth Uptown. It seems like they are going to make a conscious effort to rebrand the area as Uptown. Anyone have any thoughts on that? Good, bad, indifferent?

Well, I think it's alright. If they really want similarities to Uptown, they're going to have to get on the ball with those condo towers pretty soon :smwink:

#68 redhead

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 09:05 AM

Based on the Dallas Business Journal article and the Star Telegram one by Sandra Baker on Moday, it sounds like he is set on calling Trinity Bluff area "Uptown." The city council passed the economic package for Trinity Bluff yesterday despite the very negative ST editorial. Let's see: 6 million on a potential development of 350 million...versus 19 million for Target on a 45 million dollar investment. I think the Star Telegram writer needs to do some homework before he shoots his mouth off!!!

#69 ghughes

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 05:25 PM

LOL :smwink:
yes, and when one considers that a lot of the money "Uptown" is going to replace antiquated sewers and stuff that is actually the city's responsibility, the S-T is on even sillier ground. (But that's never given them pause at the editorial board).

#70 mosteijn

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 06:12 PM

Ah yes, not to mention the fact that Uptown will probably still be nice (structurally and aesthetically) in 30 years. I doubt the same can be said of the quality of construction of stip malls and big-box stores these days...what a waste of money. :smwink:

#71 redhead

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 05:56 PM

http://www.dfw.com/m...ion/9472345.htm

A response to the editorial regarding Trinity Bluff last week, FYI, published yesterday in the ST.

Edited by John T Roberts, 24 August 2004 - 08:41 PM.


#72 John T Roberts

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 09:36 PM

That was a great article. Thanks for posting the link and I also fixed it so it could be clicked.

Personally, I do feel the City of Fort Worth has given away too many tax abatements over the last couple of years. However, I do agree with Ms. Falconer that totally cutting off economic incentives for all projects would be an unwise decision. The city should continue to look at each case on its own merits, if that is their policy. I also feel that the City has given the tax abatements to the wrong developers. I would much rather see $19 Million go to Mr. Struhs and his development than use it to cut a hole through the Montgomery Ward building.

#73 mosteijn

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 06:36 PM

Yippee! Approval is always a good thing to hear...

City OKs deal: Trinity Bluffs gets go-ahead
JERI PETERSEN 27.AUG.04


When Fort Worth developer Tom Struhs told city council members that work on his Trinity Bluff project would begin immediately if the council approved a tax abatement zone, he was serious.




The day after the council gave approval, Struhs' office overlooking the Trinity River was demolished to make way for a 300-unit, multi-family complex - one of the first of some 1,600 residential units planned for the area.


With the city partnership locked in, Struhs can begin site preparation as soon as next month. The first housing units could begin in January with construction of 41 town homes between Belknap and Bluff Streets, where infrastructure is in place. A multi-family complex built by Lincoln Properties will begin at about the same time across the street. Another 26-unit town home project on First Street will be included in Phase 1. David Hensley Architecture will design the town homes and Fort Worth architect Billy C. Williams will design a few larger, custom plans.


The next three phases will begin after utilities are moved, sewers are re-built and curbs and gutters are constructed. The project - an area bounded by the Trinity River, Belknap Street, the Burlington Northern Santa Fe tracks and the historic Pioneers Rest Cemetery - should be complete in six to eight years, Struhs said.


At 1,800 to 2,200 square feet, the three-story townhomes with rooftop decks and two-car attached garages are expected to sell for $250,000 to $300,000. Four-story, multi-family units will be built in four phases, with as many as 900 units at completion.


Mixed in with the residential component will be enough retail, entertainment and restaurants to draw people to the river without detracting from central downtown activity, Struhs said.


Struhs had asked the city to help finance a $5-million gap for his $250-million re-development project of a blighted, 30-acre area on the Trinity River bluff. Although council members Clyde Picht and Chuck Silcox opposed yet another abatement for a private developer, Struhs' project will cost taxpayers less than projects such as Cabela's, at $27 million in public participation, or the nearly $20 million promised to Kimco/Weber on a $42.5 million re-development of the Montgomery Ward site.


Much of the city's participation involves replacing Civil War-era infrastructure to support the new development - work the city was going to do in the next six or seven years anyway, council member Wendy Davis said. Struhs agreed to pay engineering and design costs and the city will pay for construction costs.


“We're spending the money sooner, but because the developer is picking up design and engineering costs, the city ultimately saves money,” Davis said. “Tom will be putting in even more money for phases two through four; the dollars we're putting in are paying for infrastructure for all four phases. We're laying the groundwork for an unbelievable taxing opportunity for the future.”


Davis said the Trinity Bluff abatement is well deserved.


“You can look at that area right now and feel like maybe it's ripe for development. I can tell you the reason that it's ripe is because Mr. Struhs has spent the last three or four years putting together a very difficult assemblage in that area. It has not been an easy or inexpensive task,” Davis said. “Not only did he do prep work to lay the groundwork, but he's facing re-development in an area with very old infrastructure.”


The abatement approved last week will fund the project for the first year; thereafter, funding will come from proceeds generated by the TIF district.


“The wonderful thing about Tom's TIF incentive is that he's taking less out in terms of increment than his project is contributing. So the TIF gains monies over time to help with other downtown projects,” Davis said.


Earlier this year, Tarrant County College was considering a portion of Struhs' land for a downtown campus site. By the end of May, TCC decided to pass on Struhs' site, but ended up with some other parcels owned by Struhs' company, Wide Open Spaces, including Leonard's Farm & Ranch store adjacent to the proposed town home site.


“When I had my property under contract with TCC, my obligation was to assign other interests over to them by contract. They chose to keep those interests and not close on my property,” Struhs said. “It only affects me positively because we're going to have a major institution next door to us. There's nothing in real estate like having a neighbor spend $110 million on their property.”


TCC still has not announced a downtown campus site, although the college has purchased a number of parcels near the river.


In the course of acquiring properties for the Trinity Bluff development, Struhs said he gained an appreciation for the historic area, which was the site of the original fort after which the city was named.


“The area has a lot of connotation, both good and bad. It's an historical area, but it's also a blighted area,” Struhs said. “It needs a new identity. We've branded the whole area 'Uptown,' a word that conjures something very positive and also paints a crystal-clear picture of the type of upscale addition to downtown it's going to be.”

#74 John T Roberts

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 08:41 PM

Well, I must say that it certainly exciting to live in Fort Worth right now. Even though it was mentioned a few days back about the demolition of the Brooks Baker Building as the start of the construction progress, it is good to hear that the project is receiving publicity. I'm really anxious to see how the development will turn out.

#75 AndyN

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Posted 26 September 2004 - 08:24 PM

Well, I suppose it's official. Tom Struh's folks are officially marketing the Uptown label. I went to the Bass Hall for a performance of Radio Days performed by Five By Design this afternoon and there in the program was an ad for UPTOWN Fort Worth. It also lists a website WWW.UPTOWNFORTWORTH.COM that showcases their three current projects, Cassidy Corner, Pecan Place and the Bluffs. Missing content in places, but not a bad effort.

There was also an ad for Rahr & Sons beer, which I found quite interesting. Picked up a Startlegram on the way home and found an article about their efforts.

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#76 Dismuke

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Posted 03 October 2004 - 12:33 AM

When I was downtown this afternoon to look at and photograph the Baker Building minus the now removed hideously ugly 1960s era LSD trip inspired botched-up base, it was such a nice day, I decided to take a walk over to the Bluff Street and Samuels area. Here are a few pictures I took in the area:

Posted Image
I first learned about this when it was mentioned in a posting on the old Forum. It is on Bluff Street not too far east of the Paddock Viaduct. The mention on the old Forum said it was a hitching post. Does anyone know for sure. Does anyone know what the engraving is supposed to mean? Any idea how old it is?

Posted Image

I suspect that this is the old carriage step that Redhead mentioned being in the area.

Posted Image

An old brick sidewalk on Bluff Street. In one section - not visible in this photo - someone has recently dug out all of the bricks. Observe how the bricks are laid down here in such a way as to both provide a functional sidewalk and, at the same time, keep costs low by not using as many bricks.

Posted Image

Here are some of the old stone street curbs that Redhead mentioned.

Posted Image

Here is the old stone wall that I mentioned in a previous posting.


Posted Image

Wow. Whoever ends up living here is going to have one heck of a nice view!


Posted Image

I also took a walk across the Paddock Viaduct and took some pictures of the power plant and of downtown. Here is a rather pretty view of the river from the bridge.


Posted Image

Here is the new county building that they just finished. I thought that having the fountain in the foreground of the photo would be a nice touch - but the lighting just didn't work out.
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#77 mosteijn

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Posted 03 October 2004 - 08:48 AM

Thanks for posting those, Dis! It's quite interesting to see what relics remain from Fort Worth's past.

#78 redhead

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 08:56 AM

I understand that bid packages for the infrastructure have gone out on this project and are due back within the next week or two. After that, the contractor will be selected and you should see dirt moving soon. With the TCC campus going right next door, I have to wonder if the infrastructure plans are adequate to support both Trinity Bluff and the college or if the college will have to bring in additional resources to accomodate their own needs?

#79 Thurman52

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 10:47 PM

Utilities are being upgraded now. So the first phase is the Apts?

#80 redhead

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 03:20 PM

Utility contractors worked over the weekend...must be a bonus for early completion! First phase is supposed be townhomes and apartments simultaneously. Lincoln Properties should break ground in Mar-April and Alan McDonald about the same time. Alan is the fellow that sold CityHomes to Centex, but had to wait until his no compete clause expired.

#81 daddy Z

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 01:16 PM

First phase is supposed be townhomes and apartments simultaneously. Lincoln Properties should break ground in Mar-April and Alan McDonald about the same time.


My wife and I went over to the Struhs office on East 1st to look at his townhomes.
The only thing available right now are the 1,800 to 2,200 square feet, three-story townhomes with rooftop decks and two-car attached garages for $250,000 to $300,000. They are suppose to be under construction next month and finished by August of this year ? We really were not interested in this location, thinking we would like something closer to Samuels Ave. After driving down Samuels and seeing the homes and view we decided to wait for that area to be developed. We even talked about buying one of the older homes on Samuels and fixing it up ?

I am wondering if buying a fixer uper in this area is even possible at this late date. I am sure Tom's people have now canvesed the whole area and those that wanted to sell already have made arrangements. We being just a couple of old civil service workers with limited capital don't really stand a chance or do we ? Do any of the more senior members of this forum know of any prospects ? We love the downtown area and would like to spend our retirement years enjoying the city life.
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#82 Shocker

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 06:53 PM

I met Tom Struhs today down at Main St. and asked him a little about the project. I was interested mainly in highrise development and he told me his master plan includes five high rise condos totalling about 1000 units. He went on to say the tallest as of now is planned to be 16 stories. He had a really cool virtual display of how the area will look and it is a bit like uptown in Dallas which I like. He told me this project should be completed in eight years.

#83 Thurman52

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 05:31 PM

Lincoln at Trinity Bluff breaking ground Uptown
ALESHIA CLAUNCH 20.JUN.05

Fort Worth’s Uptown will take a major step toward becoming the fashionable residential neighborhood promised by developers when ground is broken June 23 at the new Lincoln at Trinity Bluff complex.

Fort Worth Mayor Mike Moncrief and District 9 City Council Representative Wendy Davis will be special guests at the groundbreaking that will help to put the city’s Uptown area on the map. The apartments will be located in Davis’ district.

Dallas-based Lincoln Property Company will develop the apartments on the northeastern edge of downtown Fort Worth. The 304 residences will be located on the bluff, 90 feet above the Trinity River.

“The dream of Uptown is becoming a reality beginning with Trinity Bluff,” said Trinity Bluff Ltd. developer Tom Struhs. “Who could be better than Lincoln Property Company with their renowned multifamily development and management expertise to construct the area’s first new residences?”

The area referred to as Fort Worth’s Uptown is a 30-acre plot of land along the Trinity River. On the northeast part of Uptown is an area called Trinity Bluff, site of planned urban community.

Trinity Bluff Ltd. is spearheaded by Struhs, who has worked with consultants to develop a master plan for the bluff area that includes several residential developments and encourages its residents to live and play on the Trinity River.

“This is a perfect example of a private-public partnership working for the good of the community,” Struhs said. “The beauty and history of the area are coming back to life thanks to the cooperation of many entities.”

Jeff Courtwright, Lincoln Property senior vice president, said the development will offer studio apartments as well as one, two and three-bedroom apartments. Studio apartments will start at about $700 per month and one-bedroom apartments will start at about $900 per month.

Courtwright said residents will have access to the existing 30 miles of jogging and biking trails along the Trinity River.

“Lincoln Property Company is extremely excited to play a part in creating a new, exciting lifestyle in the Uptown are of Fort Worth,” Courtwright said. “We believe that Lincoln at Trinity Bluff will provide the keystone to the future development of the entire master plan.”

The apartments will have four levels and a central elevator. Alongside the apartments will be a four-level parking garage for residents, which will allow tenants to park on the same level where they live.

The project is expected to be completed by next spring.

Uptown will develop further when Uptown Homes begins construction of 26 luxury town homes for sale in the upper $200 thousands later this summer.

#84 mosteijn

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 01:21 PM

:blink: A downtown groundbreaking, finally!

Are those "Uptown Homes" 26 luxury townhomes the Pecan Place Townhomes, or another part of Trinity Bluffs?

#85 John T Roberts

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 06:05 PM

Jonny, it's the Lincoln Property, 300 unit apartment complex that broke ground today. The site is just to the southwest of Nash Elementary School and it sits literally on the bluff.

#86 mosteijn

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Posted 24 June 2005 - 11:24 AM

Whoops, I think you misunderstood me, I was asking about the project the article mentions in one of the last sentances, about a company called "Uptown Homes" beginning construction on 26 luxury townhomes at the end of summer. I was asking if that was the same project as the Pecan Place Townhomes.

#87 redhead

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Posted 24 June 2005 - 11:37 AM

John is correct, and so are you Johnny. Lincoln broke ground "on the edge" as they have dubbed it, and the 26 townhomes mentioned are those at Pecan Place. In the ST this morning, Lincoln added that they are considering a 20 story tower for phase two. What views that would have looking back toward the court house!

#88 jefffwd

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Posted 24 June 2005 - 11:54 AM

John is correct, and so are you Johnny. Lincoln broke ground "on the edge" as they have dubbed it, and the 26 townhomes mentioned are those at Pecan Place. In the ST this morning, Lincoln added that they are considering a 20 story tower for phase two.  What views that would have looking back toward the court house!

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Not only a twenty story condo tower but they also mentioned a high-end hotel and shops. Vey cool!

#89 John T Roberts

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Posted 25 June 2005 - 12:56 PM

Jonny, I guess I should learn to read. I am pleased to see all of the development taking place in the northeast quadrant of downtown.

#90 David Love

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 09:38 AM

Posted on Fri, Jun. 24, 2005
Developers start Trinity Bluff apartments
By Sandra Baker
Star-Telegram Staff Writer

FORT WORTH - Developers of Trinity Bluff on the north end of downtown realized their dream of five years Thursday, when the first spade of dirt was turned to launch construction on a four-story apartment building.

In the first piece of a $350 million project, Dallas-based Lincoln Property Co. will build 304 luxury apartments on Bluff Street, between Grove and Cummings streets, on a prime location in the 30-acre development high above the Trinity River.

Other phases of the project continue to evolve. Developers said Thursday that they are considering adding a 20-story condo tower, a high-end hotel and shops.

"We'll do whatever the market will say is the right thing to do," said Tom Struhs, who is developing the project with his wife, Elizabeth Falconer, and Rudy Renda.

More than 100 business and community leaders gathered at the site for a groundbreaking ceremony.

Lincoln at Trinity Bluff will consist of one building wrapped around a parking garage that lets residents park on the same floor as their apartments. The building, with a largely brick exterior, was designed with a "mercantile style" of architecture to blend with the many brick buildings downtown.

Seventy percent of the units will be studio or one-bedroom apartments, with an average size of about 880 square feet and priced at $1,100 a month.

Construction will start in earnest in early August, with the first units available for lease by fall of next year, said Jeff Courtwright, a senior vice president at Lincoln. The apartments are slated to be completed by the end of 2006.

"Any real good downtown project takes time to put together," Courtwright said. "We want to make it the place it should be."

Courtwright said Lincoln Property is in early talks with the developers on a second phase that will include apartments and condos. They would be farther north on Samuels Avenue, near Pioneers Rest cemetery, in an area now being referred to as UpTown.

City Homes of Fort Worth has also bought lots within the development and will build 40 town houses near Lincoln Property's project.

Preston Carter, a real estate broker with the exclusive listing on Trinity Bluff, said he is in talks with high-end hoteliers and anticipates the development being built out in about five years.

After scouting the market several years ago, Struhs and his partners quietly started buying land and run-down houses in the historic Samuels Avenue neighborhood, which dates to the late 1800s and where some of the city's early leaders once lived.

Years of neglect had taken its toll, and many of the century-old homes were in disrepair.

Now the area is highly sought-after again. Tarrant County College considered it before opting to build its $135 million downtown campus spanning the river, with part below Trinity Bluff.

It took the developers a couple of years to acquire the properties needed for Trinity Bluff, and a good deal of time was spent putting plans together and updating infrastructure before construction could begin.

The area now has new streets, sewers and water mains, and soon the electric and cable lines will be buried.

Fort Worth Mayor Mike Moncrief said Thursday that Trinity Bluff is setting a "strong, positive tone" for the city's growth, as well as providing "a new way to look at our downtown."

Fort Worth's population has increased 14 percent in five years, necessitating projects like Trinity Bluff, he said.

#91 mosteijn

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 06:02 PM

That article made me happy. Why can't there be more people like Struhs in Fort Worth :blink: ?

#92 John T Roberts

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 05:19 AM

I learned this last week at the Downtown Fort Worth, Inc. quarterly lunch. I wanted to wait until the facts were straight. Today the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported on this second phase of the development. This next portion of the project will be a 20 story condominium building to be built on Samuels Avenue just across the street from Pioneer's Rest Cemetery. Below is the Star-Telegram article from the Baker and Jares column.

Plans confirmed for condo tower

The developer of Trinity Bluff has confirmed that a 20-story condo tower will be a part of its residential and retail development on the north end of downtown Fort Worth.

At a groundbreaking last month for a four-story, 304-unit apartment building, the first phase of the planned $350 million project, Tom Struhs said his group was considering a 20-story tower.

Last week, during his speech at the quarterly luncheon of Downtown Fort Worth Inc., Struhs showed a computer-animated model of the proposed structure and told attendees that he hopes to start construction by next summer.

The tower will be part of a joint venture with Dallas-based Lincoln Property Co., which is also involved on the apartment building, under construction on Bluff Street between Grove and Cummings streets, above the Trinity River.

Struhs said Lincoln's architects will soon begin designing the condo tower, which may have 274 units. It will be across Samuels Avenue from Pioneers Rest Cemetery, he said.

Struhs said Trinity Bluff is moving along as planned. He and partners Rudy Renda and Elizabeth Falconer, Struhs' wife, amassed 30 acres for the project during the past few years under the name Wide Open Spaces.

"The only thing on our schedule that has changed is its acceleration," Struhs said. Trinity Bluff should be completed in about six years, a few years earlier than originally thought, he said.

-- Sandra Baker

#93 mosteijn

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 07:27 PM

John, have you seen the concept drawings? They look very discouraging. Of course they're just concepts but ones that (IMO) we'd better hope change significantly for the better before this thing gets built.

Oh well, a 20 story tower for Fort Worth! Notice how Struhs just casually mentioned this a few weeks ago and is now seriously planning to build it, while we have yet to hear ANYTHING on that Schaumburg development "The Ruins"... ;)

#94 John T Roberts

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 09:05 PM

I saw the new rendering at the Downtown Fort Worth, Inc. Quarterly Luncheon. Struhs had a new 3D fly by of the project. This supposedly is a done deal, so I do look forward to it.

It would be nice to hear of some progress from Schaumburg on "The Ruins".

#95 Now in Denton

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 08:29 AM

20 stories is way to high . I know not all office buildings stories are not all same hight but goodness ! From Pioneer's Rest ? Trinity Project has hight giudlines .But The Bluffs will have a 20 story building? What about the view from the Courthouse?
That's way to big for a tiny Neighborhood.

#96 Urbndwlr

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Posted 22 July 2005 - 08:31 PM

I actually agree with you on that. Without having the site plan in front of me I can only speak in general terms, however I believe that the north side of Belknap should be limited to about 6 stories (maybe with small towers, steeples, etc that protrude above) to not overwhelm the existing historic neighborhood.

Anything 7+ stories should be built south of Belknap. IMO, the high density buildings should go as close to the Downtown core as possible.

#97 mosteijn

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Posted 22 July 2005 - 10:12 PM

I actually agree with you on that.  Without having the site plan in front of me I can only speak in general terms, however I believe that the north side of Belknap should be limited to about 6 stories (maybe with small towers, steeples, etc that protrude above) to not overwhelm the existing historic neighborhood. 

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Considering that almost everything between the cemetary and the Cotton Belt tracks has been either demolished or moved, the historic neighborhood really doesn't "exist" anymore, so height restrictions in place to preserve it would be kind of pointless, don't you think? Struhs' PD for the majority of the property has no height restrictions, so he can basically go as tall as he wants. I do think it would make more sense to concentrate the higher building densities towards downtown, and it really baffles me that he chose to start off with a 20 story building at the most remote part of the project, especially because he has a 45 degree residential slope buffer in place. We'll see how that goes...

#98 JBB

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Posted 22 July 2005 - 10:51 PM

If I'm not mistaken, most of the historic properties on the West side of Samuels, to the North of the proposed building site, were not demolished.

#99 John T Roberts

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 07:41 AM

You are correct JBB; however, some of those historic houses have been demolished. For the most part, the neighborhood is intact north of Pioneer's Rest Cemetery and on the west side of Samuels. There are a few smaller houses on the east side of the street that remain. Jonny, when you get a chance, you should drive along the northern end of Samuels Avenue.

#100 mosteijn

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Posted 23 July 2005 - 07:52 AM

Jonny, when you get a chance, you should drive along the northern end of Samuels Avenue.

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Actually I have been up Samuels quite a bit, mainly to check out the neighborhood, and indeed north of the Trinity Bluffs site are some amazing historic houses and some nice, smaller ones. Which is why I think height restrictions at the north of the site, not anywhere else, make sense to ensure Trinity Bluffs tapers down to blend with the neighborhood better. Something like that exists in Struhs' zoning, where he has to stagger his building to make sure it doesn't go above 45 degrees from a 3 floor height at the edge of his property, and why he wants his first 20 storey tower here instead of the nice, small, 12 storey building on the Master Plan is beyond me.





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