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#1 Dismuke

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 11:34 PM

Is anyone here familiar with an old community called Stop Haines which was located somewhere on the old Fort Worth to Dallas Interurban line? My guess is the old highway to Dallas - old Highway 80, went through it. There was also a location near Stop Haines known as Death Crossing.

The only reference of it on the Internet was the following obituary from the old Fort Worth Record in 1920 that I found in a google search:

QUOTE
“PIONEER METHODIST PASTOR PASSES AWAY. Rev. D. W. Smith, age 75, a resident of Tarrant county for 61 years, died Saturday morning at his home at Stop-Haines on the Fort Worth-Dallas interurban. He had been an invalid for 13 years. He was born in Golden Grove, Mo., April 21, 1845, the family moving to Texas when he was 14 years of age. The family camped for a year on what is now Trinity Park before moving to what is now known as Smithfield, named after the family. He entered the Confederate army when 16 years old and fought throughout the war. On his return home he became a Methodist minister and gave 23 years of his life to his church. Deceased is survived by his wife, three sons, W. P. of Fort Worth, J. W. of Dallas, C. B. Smith of McKinney; three daughters, Mrs. G. A. Meacham of Clinton, Okla., Mrs. R. S. Clous of Dallas and Mrs. C. J. Knowles of Outlook, Wash.; one step-son, Floyd Honecker of Fort Worth; one half-brother, 30 grandchildren and 17 great-grand-children. Funeral services will be held at the home at Stop Haines at 1 o’clock Sunday, followed by interment at the Smithfield Cemetery at 3 o’clock. The Masons will have charge of the body at the grave.”


An elderly gentleman told me about having been to Stop Haines when he was young and mentioned Death Crossing - but he was not able to tell me exactly where it was located and I have been a bit curious about it.
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#2 Wildcard

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 04:48 AM

Dismuke, it's good to see you posting again! I couldn't find anything about a stop called Haines on the Interurban line but I did find some info about Smithfield and Smithfield cemetery in present day N Richland Hills. I'm assuming the cemetery was nearby and it does seem to be right on a rail line:

http://maps.yahoo.co...ew=1&name=&qty=

http://4dw.net/hearr...smithfield.html

Also this appears on the Handbook of Texas website, http://www.tsha.utex...js17_print.html

SMITHFIELD, TEXAS. Smithfield, in north central Tarrant County, was probably established before 1870 and was originally called Zion. A post office opened there in 1878. In 1887 the St. Louis and Southwestern Railway built through the area a quarter mile south of Zion, and a new section of the community grew up near the tracks. This new development siphoned away population and businesses from the older section, which eventually was abandoned. The new railroad settlement was called Smithfield, for Eli Smith, who had donated land for a church and cemetery in Zion. Smithfield initially flourished as a shipping point for the products of area farms and ranches. Though the town suffered a bad fire in 1890, by 1900 it had a population of 137, and the local school employed three teachers and enrolled 156 students from the area. The population of Smithfield remained at about the same level through the 1930s, but it began to grow around World War IIqv because of the boom in war-related employment in nearby Fort Worth. By the late 1940s Smithfield reported 350 residents and eight businesses. After a bitterly contested campaign and election, however, nearby North Richland Hills annexed Smithfield in 1958. The Smithfield name survives in several local institutions, including a middle school, and on historical markers at the Smithfield cemetery, Masonic lodge, and two churches.

Pretty interesting stuff, I hope this helps!

#3 Wildcard

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 05:51 AM

OK, another link. It appears that Smithfield was served by the St. Louis & SW Railroad which ran out of downtown Fort Worth to Smithfield, Grapevine, Coppell, Carrollton, Renner, Plano, etc. Zoom in on Tarrant County and you'll be able to follow the route:

http://memory.loc.go...p/~ammem_4m06::

#4 Buck

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 07:19 AM

The only "Death Crossing" I know was at the 3-way intersection of the train, Division, Fielder and Abram in Arlington.

There's a bridge there now instead of a grade crossing.



#5 M C Toyer

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 11:34 PM

Johnnie Myers's "Texas Electric Railway" (Central Electric Railfan Association Bulletin 121, published in 1982) has a route and rate chart for the North Texas Traction Company.

Haines is listed at 6.1 miles from the Ft Worth terminal. For comparison, Oakland is 4.8 miles and Handley is 7.1 miles.

The stop preceeding Haines is Edgewood/Roseland at 5.3 miles and the suceeding stop is Siding 6 / Duringer at 6.4 miles.

I believe I read this on a earlier thread on this forum - the president of Waples Platter had a private stop at his residence and was killed there when driving across the Interurban tracks in an automobile. The Waples stop was at 10.1 miles from the Ft Worth terminal. Might that be the "death crossing?"

M C Toyer

#6 M C Toyer

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 11:47 PM

I should add there is a map of the North Texas Traction Company route on the Library of Congress American Memory Project website.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/

Click the link for "Maps" and enter the search term "Ft Worth"

The map shows most of the towns along the route but not the actual stops. It also has a sketch of Lake Erie (Handley).

M C

#7 Dismuke

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 02:55 AM

QUOTE(M C Toyer @ Dec 11 2005, 01:34 AM) View Post


Haines is listed at 6.1 miles from the Ft Worth terminal. For comparison, Oakland is 4.8 miles and Handley is 7.1 miles.

The stop preceeding Haines is Edgewood/Roseland at 5.3 miles and the suceeding stop is Siding 6 / Duringer at 6.4 miles.


Very interesting. Do you suppose with the distance for Stop Haines being 6.1 miles that either it or Siding 6 became known as today's "Stop Six"? Isn't Stop Six somewhere in that area? That is one of several Fort Worth neighborhoods that I hear mentioned from time to time but am not fully sure exactly where it is.

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#8 Buck

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 04:19 PM

Check the clips at http://www.dallasnew...toricalarchives --

I'd say Stop Haines is Sagamore Hill.

One clipping announces the opening of Meadowbrook Golf Course a half-mile from Stop Haines.

And Sagamore Hill was a community with its own school district separate from Polytechnic. One of the families was the Hietts, and there's even a clipping about a Hiett.



#9 Buck

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 04:23 PM

Several of the clippings describe "Death Crossing" as a mile west of Arlington. I think that would match the Abram-Fielder location for that landmark.

There was some huge Interurban-car crash there that killed like 8, I think.




#10 Buck

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 05:02 PM

Found a 1921 clipping that lists this order:

Sycamore Creek
Sycamore Heights
Tandy's Lake
Virginia
Nona
Oakland
Sagamore Hill
Haines
Siding Six
Point Breeze
West Handley
Handley

#11 M C Toyer

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 05:25 PM

QUOTE(Buck @ Dec 11 2005, 04:19 PM) View Post



I'd say Stop Haines is Sagamore Hill.




Buck -

On the Texas Electric Railway North Texas Traction Company ca 1920 route list Sagamore Hill is at 5.1 miles from the Ft Worth Terminal, but penciled in are the words (Stop 6). There is one stop between there and Haines, Edgewood, aka Roseland, at 5.3 miles.

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#12 M C Toyer

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 05:59 PM

Here is the complete route and rate list titled "Northern Texas Traction Company Local Passenger Tariff No. 5, Effective 26 December 1920."

http://www.geocities...ps/1920nttc.jpg

I do not know when the penciled notations were made.

M C

#13 Dismuke

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 12:38 AM

QUOTE(M C Toyer @ Dec 11 2005, 07:59 PM) View Post

Here is the complete route and rate list titled "Northern Texas Traction Company Local Passenger Tariff No. 5, Effective 26 December 1920."

http://www.geocities...ps/1920nttc.jpg

I do not know when the penciled notations were made.

M C



Very interesting. When factoring in currency inflation using this nifty online tool at: http://www.aier.org/...lcalculator.cgi that $1 one way trip in 1920 from Fort Worth to Dallas cost $9.75. The $1.80 round trip was $17.54 Not a very cheap commute. My guess is that it was used more for things such as business trips/sales calls between the two cities and people visiting families more than it was for daily commuting. Is that correct?
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#14 AndyN

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 09:43 PM

QUOTE(Dismuke @ Dec 12 2005, 02:38 AM) View Post


Very interesting. When factoring in currency inflation using this nifty online tool at: http://www.aier.org/...lcalculator.cgi that $1 one way trip in 1920 from Fort Worth to Dallas cost $9.75. The $1.80 round trip was $17.54 Not a very cheap commute. My guess is that it was used more for things such as business trips/sales calls between the two cities and people visiting families more than it was for daily commuting. Is that correct?


Looks like everyone derived the answer before I got back to my computer. Sorry, I was out of town.

I do think that people felt that Dallas was a lot further away in the 1920s than it seems now. There was definitely a lot more open land between the two cities and the competing transportation systems were much inferior to the interstates we have now, much less riding in an open automobile with wood spoke wheels. I think there was a price difference for the locals and the express or limited train, later known as the Crimson Limited. By 1924 Northern Texas Traction was feeling the pinch of automobile/bus traffic and by 1935 had given up the fight to the automobile (although government antitrust suits against corporate parent Stone & Webster may have also helped advance the shutdown).

As I recall, there is still a set of stairs or a concrete platform or something at the Haines Stop, the interurban grade is very apparent and there are some of the old bridge abutments along the grade. Ironically, the old Highway 80 bridge with a trolley wire trough is still in place where the interurban crossed under just west of Handley next to a Racetrack(?) gas station. I have heard a story that one of the family members was hit and killed by an interurban at the crossing next to the Haines Stop.

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#15 AndyN

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 11:40 PM

Oh, and as to the original question, Stop Haines was not, to my knowledge, a community. It was a private farm. Not sure how they rated their own stop, but I think this link will take you to an aerial photo of Stop Haines.

dfwmaps.com aerial
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#16 M C Toyer

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 12:33 AM

QUOTE(AndyN @ Dec 12 2005, 11:40 PM) View Post

Oh, and as to the original question, Stop Haines was not, to my knowledge, a community. It was a private farm. Not sure how they rated their own stop, but I think this link will take you to an aerial photo of Stop Haines.

dfwmaps.com aerial



Andy -

Thanks for your input and expertise. This and earlier threads remind me I need to get out and take some photos of those remnants while they still survive.

The link you posted shows a site east of Green Oaks Blvd / Dottie Lynn Parkway. Wasn't Haines west of present 820? Might the stop in the link be Waples?

M C

#17 AndyN

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 07:38 PM

QUOTE(M C Toyer @ Dec 13 2005, 02:33 AM) View Post

QUOTE(AndyN @ Dec 12 2005, 11:40 PM) View Post

Oh, and as to the original question, Stop Haines was not, to my knowledge, a community. It was a private farm. Not sure how they rated their own stop, but I think this link will take you to an aerial photo of Stop Haines.

dfwmaps.com aerial



Andy -

Thanks for your input and expertise. This and earlier threads remind me I need to get out and take some photos of those remnants while they still survive.

The link you posted shows a site east of Green Oaks Blvd / Dottie Lynn Parkway. Wasn't Haines west of present 820? Might the stop in the link be Waples?

M C



Duh blink.gif I should have looked at Buck's timetable listing. You're right, I flubbed it.

And with regard to someone else's question on whether I live at the house with the semaphore signal north of Azle, no, not me. I am off of the main roads, but I do have a railroad crossbuck, a 1957 transit bus and a streetcar at my house.
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#18 AndyN

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 04:59 PM

I was looking at this Old Fort Worth Map and noticed that Haines is shown in the inset at the upper right hand corner. I can read the details very well, but it clearly shows Haines.

Something else I found interesting about this map is the helium production plant and diridgible port in far north Fort Worth.
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#19 Buck

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 09:40 PM

Perfect -- Stop Haines was at Lancaster and Tierney.

I also notice that Panola is labeled the "old Dallas road."

Never knew that.

#20 FWillustrator

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 08:31 AM

I might be mistaken, but it appears on the map furnished by AndyN that the Dallas Pike was actually present day Meadowbrook - not Lancaster. Comparing the geometry of this old map to contemporary maps, it appears to me that stop Haines was the corner of Meadowbrook and Tierny. I'm fairly familiar with this area, since I live about 3 blocks from there - near Edgewood and Normandy - shown as Edgewood and "Armstrong" on the old map.

#21 FWillustrator

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 08:38 AM

Woops - I was mistaken. Tarrant Appraisal tax maps still have the southeast corner of Tierney and Lancaster labelled as "Haines Place." [url=http://www.tad.org/MapPDF/t2078-388.pdf]


#22 Dismuke

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 11:55 AM

There is something else interesting about that map - it shows a street called "Bowman Springs Rd" in a part of town southwest of TWU. The road still exists on Mapquest - but its modern name is Burchill Rd North. On both maps, it runs from East Maddox Ave in a southwest diagonal to Vaughn Avenue. There are a few blocks where the modern road runs with a modern street called Mitchell Blvd. Both the vintage and the modern streets end at Vaughn Blvd.

Now, what is strange, is that there is also a Bowman Springs Rd off of I-20 in far southwest Arlington. I have always assumed that it had something to do with the fact that Johnson's Creek and Lake Arlington were nearby and that perhaps it was named by early settler's for a nearby spring. I looked on Mapquest and noticed that road ends not too far north of I-20 and to the south it turns into Main Street in Kennedale.

Now I am curious: Where was Bowman Springs and why would there be two different streets so far a way from each other named after it?
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#23 Buck

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 12:58 PM

Bowman Springs Road connected before the lake was built.

I have no idea where Bowman Springs was!

#24 mbdalton1

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 09:47 PM

QUOTE(Buck @ Jan 27 2006, 12:58 PM) View Post

Bowman Springs Road connected before the lake was built.

I have no idea where Bowman Springs was!


Fabulous! I just love this little tid bit of local history. I live in Mansfield and drive past the Bowman Springs Rd. Exit on I-20 everday on my way into downtown FTW.

Anybody have any further info on this?

mary bess





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