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FW's Next Area to Revitalize?


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#101 hannerhan

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 02:09 PM

http://www.bizjourna...r-district.html



#102 Doohickie

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 06:13 PM

That could help boost existing neighborhoods in River Oaks and the Burton Hill area.


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#103 RD Milhollin

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 06:59 AM

More info regarding Fort Worth's "River District":

 

http://www.star-tele...le71840162.html

 

The name of the area is, as the articles suggest, the result of several developers of individual projects coming together in collaboration. Glad to see that the name actually reflects an on-the-ground-reality, The River. Too often the names of new areas being developed are pulled out of the air, two descriptives randomly combined by marketing types, and have no descriptive connection to the place. Of course these are actually redevelopments; the neighborhoods have been in place for about a hundred years and had lost a lot of their vitality over time. It's great to see some historic place names being recognized and reused. The River District name recognizes the Trinity River West Fork as the defining characteristic that all the projects underway share. All of this is great news for inner city redevelopment in Fort Worth.

 

Now... transit? Perhaps it is a good time to introduce the idea of using White Settlement Road as the route for a Westside transit route that could eventually connect Lockheed Martin and points west such as the Walsh Ranch developments to Downtown.



#104 hannerhan

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 07:46 AM

Also there's a website now: http://www.riverdistrictfw.com/



#105 Russ Graham

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 08:11 AM

It's great to see some historic place names being recognized and reused.

 

I agree in general, but "White Settlement Road" is one name that needs to be changed to basically anything else.   That town can call itself whatever it wants to, but Fort Worth doesn't have to use it.  River Oaks road would be better.  Or "The River District Road" would be fine too.  I used to live on that road and I hated giving my address over the phone.



#106 JBB

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 11:18 AM

I agree. There would be pushback from a lot of long-standing businesses on that particular road, especially given its length, but this would be a perfect opportunity.

#107 Doohickie

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 02:46 PM

How 'bout "Crystal Springs Road"?
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#108 hannerhan

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 05:52 PM

 

It's great to see some historic place names being recognized and reused.

 

I agree in general, but "White Settlement Road" is one name that needs to be changed to basically anything else. 

 

 

I'd be against changing the name (as the residents of the town overwhelmingly were when that issue came up).  It's history, and if anything it reminds us that times used to be different, and that we should remember that fact.



#109 Big Frog II

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 12:06 PM

 

It's great to see some historic place names being recognized and reused.

 

I agree in general, but "White Settlement Road" is one name that needs to be changed to basically anything else.   That town can call itself whatever it wants to, but Fort Worth doesn't have to use it.  River Oaks road would be better.  Or "The River District Road" would be fine too.  I used to live on that road and I hated giving my address over the phone.

 

My business use to be on that street too.  Since White Settlement Rd no longer connects to the City of White Settlement, I think it should be changed.  It was very confusing for people to find us thinking we were in White Settlement of off I-820 somewhere.  I think perhaps Greenwood Rd. might be a good name.



#110 CFerguson

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 04:43 PM

The road name should be changed.  How about B-24 Liberator Boulevard?



#111 Doohickie

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 11:08 PM

The road name should be changed.  How about B-24 Liberator Boulevard?

 

No.  Just.... no.


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#112 renamerusk

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 11:02 AM

Would "Western Road" work as a reasonable compromise?



#113 Doohickie

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 11:26 PM

Too generic.


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#114 RD Milhollin

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 01:14 AM

River Street? West Fork Way? Panther Parkway? Bomber Boulevard? Tandy Avenue?



#115 Russ Graham

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 10:16 AM

Westworth Road?  Since that's actually where the road goes.  If you expected to get to White Settlement on White Settlement Road you'd be disappointed.

 

Or taking CFerguson's idea of using noteable aircraft that have been produced at the Bomber plant:

 

Peacemaker Promenade

Hustler Highway

Aardvark Avenue

FM Fighting Falcon

Raptor Road

Lightning Lane



#116 Urbndwlr

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 05:34 PM

Ben Hogan Boulevard



#117 johnfwd

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 07:35 AM

The "Envision Hemphill" (another thread) reminded me of some parts in west Fort Worth in need of revitalization.  One that comes closest to mind is the old Benbrook Highway (Highway 377) south of the traffic circle.   One particular area is a stretch of 377 near the Valero station (Willis Avenue).  The phrase "some things change and some things remain the same" applies to this area on the fringe of the Bomber Heights neighborhood.  The old but quaint Hugo liquor store, which has been there since I was a kid.  The Show Time cabaret pillbox had seen a few business name changes over the years and now it's unoccupied.  The newest addition in that area is a Dollar General store, which appears to be struggling.  I am nostalgic, but wouldn't shed a tear if a West 7th-type development came in.  But I doubt that's going to happen here.



#118 johnfwd

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 06:25 AM

The city recently targeted the Stop Six area for revitalization, as reported in this Fort Worth Business magazine article.  Stop Six presents a challenge, in light of its history of crime and a substandard urban environment.

 

http://www.fortworth...27c26c3137.html



#119 Doohickie

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 11:47 AM

I just thought I'd note that groups that I ride bicycles with (Night Riders, Critical Mass) seem to be riding on the east side more frequently.  Lancaster, Vickery, Rosedale, Allen, Morningside are all routes to the east side that are being used for forays into Meadowbrook, Historic Southside, Morningside and Glencrest neighborhoods. 

 

They are becoming more well-known to "that Southside cycling crowd" and there several folks that are moving in there as a more affordable alternative to Fairmount and South Main Village.

 

I think this may be the way gentrification starts.


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#120 John T Roberts

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 12:04 PM

I believe that you may be right.



#121 Doohickie

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 12:18 PM

Another thought:  If the Butler Place/Terrell revitalization is successful, it may prove to be a gateway/mixing bowl between downtown and the south side east of I-35W.


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#122 rriojas71

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 04:33 PM

I think the area to the east of Jacksboro, north of Northside Dr., South of 25th and West of Circle Park Dr. is an area on the upswing.
My mom lives in that area and several houses have been bought and remodeled by younger families and the area sits on the bluff overlooking Rockwood park and West 7th. It is smack dab in the middle of 3 major areas... Downtown, Stockyards and the Cultural District not to mention easy access to the Trinity Trails.

#123 John T Roberts

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 05:05 PM

I have always thought that the old city of North Fort Worth had a lot of potential.



#124 Askelon

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 11:03 PM

   Oh now we're talking about where I grew up. Consider me biased but I have always thought that the area had great potential, even when I was young. And that was before the Stockyard rebirth. I joke that I had to step over the same wino sleeping in the same doorway on Main Street every Saturday walking home from the New Isis- except that it's true. ( Thank God for Steve Murrin, Spencer Taylor, etc. al.)

 Even then I took note of some good housing stock in that area. Not just the obvious choices on Grand Ave either. There are some real gems of different sizes sprinkled in those neighborhoods. And it's hard to visulize the potential going west on 25th street ( now the home of tire shops and used furniture stores) but notice the the old existing storefronts just yearning (and yes, I did say yearning,) for restoration.

 I do think the beginnings of this renaissance would naturally start at the southern end ,nearer downtown, and potentially build northward. And I would hate to see it lose it's character. Don't make it so cool, hip, (whatever the word of the day is,) that it forces out the long-timers. Some families have lived there for 4 generations

 Crazy? Maybe so. But about 50+ years ago I lived on Samuels Ave.- and it has changed drastically.


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#125 John T Roberts

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 09:03 AM

I have been noting for years the quality of the housing stock in that area.  Many of these homes have good bones.  There are also several historic homes that have been remuddled to the point that you can hardly tell they had some architectural character.  As for Samuels Avenue, it has really changed and more changes are coming.  The good news is that the Embrey development is going to save the Garvey House and there are efforts going on to save at least two of the other homes in the path of that development.



#126 bclaridge

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 04:50 AM

With some of the redevelopment occurring along South Main and Hemphill north of Rosedale, I feel that Hemphill south of Rosedale, next to the Fairmount and Ryan Place neighborhoods, could also benefit from redevelopment soon as well.  The commercial along 8th Avenue/Cleburne Road from Berry Street up to All Saints hospital could also use some revitalization, especially considering that Ryan Place is a nicer neighborhood than the commercial development along 8th Avenue would otherwise imply.  Extending the TexRail line southwest from downtown (as originally planned) would help with this.

Speaking of the south side, if a commuter rail line could be added along the rail line paralleling 35W going south of downtown, it would be nice to see transit-oriented developments pop up along the 35W corridor, somewhat akin to (a smaller version of) Central Expressway in Dallas between downtown and NorthPark.  This would be highly unlikely unless you got higher-income residents into the immediate area though.


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#127 Jeriat

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 12:18 PM

Speaking of the south side, if a commuter rail line could be added along the rail line paralleling 35W going south of downtown, it would be nice to see transit-oriented developments pop up along the 35W corridor, somewhat akin to (a smaller version of) Central Expressway in Dallas between downtown and NorthPark.  This would be highly unlikely unless you got higher-income residents into the immediate area though.


You mean I-30? Because you'd be more likely to see that, especially with some of the development already proposed.

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#128 bclaridge

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 02:26 PM

I do agree that the I-30 West Freeway would be a more likely corridor for something like that to happen, as there are plenty of higher-income areas to support such developments.  However, you wouldn't get commuter rail without taking people's property for right-of-way, or building some kind of elevated rail line above the freeway.  The 35W south corridor already has a rail line that parallels the freeway, but it is a lower income area.  I do see some potential in the 35W corridor in the event that a commuter rail line going due south of downtown were to be implemented; I simply mentioned Central Expressway as an "extreme" example of what could happen if you have a major freeway and commuter rail line paralleling each other.  I simply don't see that happening along 35W south, not without some dramatic changes to the average socioeconomic status of the area.

 

However, I would like the city to try and encourage corporations to set up offices in the central city (including downtown and the surrounding areas like the south side, Panther Island, and the like) instead of building large campuses in far-flung suburban parts of the city.  Perhaps having more enticing tax incentives could do the trick?  And if you got offices in the central city, you would also want families of employees to settle down closer to downtown too, so you would want better schools and quality educational programs available close to downtown.


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#129 renamerusk

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 03:00 PM

I do agree that the I-30 West Freeway would be a more likely corridor for something like that to happen, as there are plenty of higher-income areas to support such developments.  However, you wouldn't get commuter rail without taking people's property for right-of-way....but it is a lower income area.  I do see some potential in the 35W corridor in the event that a commuter rail line going due south of downtown were to be implemented;....  I simply don't see that happening along 35W south, not without some dramatic changes to the average socioeconomic status of the area......

 

 Ok, so I think your premise about income is flawed.

 

The property that would be taken is property owned largely by small businesses; there is hardly any sizeable amount of residential property fronting the 35W corridor.  If you would just look at how the reconstruction of Hwy183/820 has been achieved and is now being achieved through Irving, you can see that a transit corridor could be implemented if there is a demand.

 

As for transit, the most demand would be in areas where auto ownership and its additional costs require a greater percentage of a person's income.  Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and transit nodes would have a spillover effect into the surrounding neighborhoods.

 

As long as transit addresses the needs of the surrounding neighborhoods, there will likely be deep support for affordable transportation within these neighborhoods.  Where transit typically meets the most resistance is in neighborhoods that do not feel a special need to use it.



#130 Austin55

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 06:15 PM

With some of the redevelopment occurring along South Main and Hemphill north of Rosedale, I feel that Hemphill south of Rosedale, next to the Fairmount and Ryan Place neighborhoods, could also benefit from redevelopment soon as well.

 

I think Hemphill all the way down from Vickery could really be a nice street. There's a ton of room for development between Biddison and Bolt which is mostly vacant land, industrial, or some gas pads. The whole street is such an important transit corridor to, some proper density could really be beneficial to all the surrounding neighborhoods.

 

cjU5ga9.png



#131 Doohickie

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:47 AM

 

With some of the redevelopment occurring along South Main and Hemphill north of Rosedale, I feel that Hemphill south of Rosedale, next to the Fairmount and Ryan Place neighborhoods, could also benefit from redevelopment soon as well.

 

I think Hemphill all the way down from Vickery could really be a nice street. There's a ton of room for development between Biddison and Bolt which is mostly vacant land, industrial, or some gas pads. The whole street is such an important transit corridor to, some proper density could really be beneficial to all the surrounding neighborhoods.

 

cjU5ga9.png

 

 

If you take that all the way down to Seminary, the obvious tie-in would be La Gran Plaza.  I would think it would be beneficial to get some "frontage", if you will of La Gran Plaza onto Hemphill to serve as a gateway into the plaza.  The problem is the train tracks effectively cut off the Hemphill piece from La Gran Plaza.

 

I'm not familiar enough with the plaza to know what kind of business would complement what's already there and would serve to draw people in.

 

Maybe for the locals that's not important, but I've ridden and driven up and down Hemphill lots of times and not realized I was only a block from the plaza.


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#132 johnfwd

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 10:44 AM

As we all know, the vogue in modern commercial revitalization is to replace the strips of storefronts with mixed-used developments, such as was done to West Seventh.  Obviously this is long term.  Wouldn't it be wonderful to replace these commercial strips along Hemphill, East Lancaster, Berry Street, and West Camp Bowie Boulevard, to name a few?






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