Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Casinos


  • Please log in to reply
62 replies to this topic

Poll: Where should a Tarrant County casino go? (33 member(s) have cast votes)

My question to you is since we would possibly get only one resort-style casino in the TC - where would you put it?

  1. Fort Worth Stockyards (17 votes [48.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 48.57%

  2. Downtown/Trinity River (6 votes [17.14%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.14%

  3. Near the new Cowboys stadium in Arlington (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. Add on to the Gaylord Texan (4 votes [11.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.43%

  5. Alliance area (2 votes [5.71%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.71%

  6. Other (6 votes [17.14%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.14%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#51 seurto

seurto

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 650 posts
  • Location:SWFW
  • Interests:FW, TX, history, cooking, party planning/giving (Par-Tays Plus), vino! My dogs, chickens and duck!

Posted 09 January 2007 - 08:01 AM

QUOTE(safly @ Jan 9 2007, 03:06 AM) View Post

Here. And that is why I made that point. I know of a DTFW latenight BYOB myself, and am very atuned to the TABC laws and bylaws in regards to the operation. Irregardless of alcohol sales percentages, If you have a TABC permit then you must comply with. Dollar boozee, hear we come.




Safly - not related to this thread, but gotta a TABC question you can probably answer: Some people I know rollwink.gif provided intermission refreshments for a show at a theater on the N Side. Neither entity has a "liquor license" so beer and wine could not be sold, but "donations requested." Word was there couldn't be signage to that affect, (such as: Suggested donation - $3) as it would be the same as asking a set price. Do you know the particulars on that? It can get repetitive verbalizing such in a crowd. huh.gif

Sorry to interrupt the conversation..... please continue sleep.gif

#52 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 10 January 2007 - 12:15 AM

QUOTE(seurto @ Jan 9 2007, 07:52 AM) View Post

Just asking - really - but aren't the TABC laws subject to change? If a casino group came in waving a big enough wad of cash and said "we need license to open the bars at any time at any price," would our fine upstanding legislature et al say "no, we do this for the good people of Texas."? Or would it be, "well, ya'know, it will benefit the people in the longrun if we give in to this group now"? Not that I'm cynical about gov'ment or anything (especially these days rolleyes.gif )...........



As far as changing laws. That would depend on who we vote in to office(s) (their stand on issues) and if these laws pose any threat to State and/or Federal constitutions (Judicial Appointees).

Lobbying is lobbying and it is purely motivated by FREE SPEECH????? OK, dollars too. smile.gif

Gubment is like a bridge that connects WE THE PEOPLE with DEMOCRACY, and it is VERY flexible in the long run, but always well supported. In a sense, GUBMENT is our little... "dog". Always there "for you" everyday. We are GUBMENT, and GUBMENT is YOU.

I think? mellow.gif
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#53 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 10 January 2007 - 12:25 AM

QUOTE(seurto @ Jan 9 2007, 08:01 AM) View Post

QUOTE(safly @ Jan 9 2007, 03:06 AM) View Post

Here. And that is why I made that point. I know of a DTFW latenight BYOB myself, and am very atuned to the TABC laws and bylaws in regards to the operation. Irregardless of alcohol sales percentages, If you have a TABC permit then you must comply with. Dollar boozee, hear we come.




Safly - not related to this thread, but gotta a TABC question you can probably answer: Some people I know rollwink.gif provided intermission refreshments for a show at a theater on the N Side. Neither entity has a "liquor license" so beer and wine could not be sold, but "donations requested." Word was there couldn't be signage to that affect, (such as: Suggested donation - $3) as it would be the same as asking a set price. Do you know the particulars on that? It can get repetitive verbalizing such in a crowd. huh.gif

Sorry to interrupt the conversation..... please continue sleep.gif



IF I am not mistaken, only a NOT-FOR PROFIT can offer a "suggestive" donation for alcohol. Their is a section in THE BOOK regarding signage for licensed and non-licensed venues.

For me, I would have just sold what TABC calls "set-ups", such as a $3 FROSTY MUG or $5 Wine stems. TABC does allow those types of sales to occur. Also a $10 bucket of ice for those who bring their own, as Christopher Walken would say, "Shammpuhhhnya" newlaugh.gif would also work.
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#54 seurto

seurto

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 650 posts
  • Location:SWFW
  • Interests:FW, TX, history, cooking, party planning/giving (Par-Tays Plus), vino! My dogs, chickens and duck!

Posted 10 January 2007 - 07:44 AM

QUOTE(safly @ Jan 10 2007, 02:25 AM) View Post

QUOTE(seurto @ Jan 9 2007, 08:01 AM) View Post

QUOTE(safly @ Jan 9 2007, 03:06 AM) View Post

Here. And that is why I made that point. I know of a DTFW latenight BYOB myself, and am very atuned to the TABC laws and bylaws in regards to the operation. Irregardless of alcohol sales percentages, If you have a TABC permit then you must comply with. Dollar boozee, hear we come.




Safly - not related to this thread, but gotta a TABC question you can probably answer: Some people I know rollwink.gif provided intermission refreshments for a show at a theater on the N Side. Neither entity has a "liquor license" so beer and wine could not be sold, but "donations requested." Word was there couldn't be signage to that affect, (such as: Suggested donation - $3) as it would be the same as asking a set price. Do you know the particulars on that? It can get repetitive verbalizing such in a crowd. huh.gif

Sorry to interrupt the conversation..... please continue sleep.gif



IF I am not mistaken, only a NOT-FOR PROFIT can offer a "suggestive" donation for alcohol. Their is a section in THE BOOK regarding signage for licensed and non-licensed venues.

For me, I would have just sold what TABC calls "set-ups", such as a $3 FROSTY MUG or $5 Wine stems. TABC does allow those types of sales to occur. Also a $10 bucket of ice for those who bring their own, as Christopher Walken would say, "Shammpuhhhnya" newlaugh.gif would also work.


Thanks for the info - that's very interesting. We, I mean, they will have to keep that in mind next time. Is "The Book" written in language even I could understand, or is it a lot of jargon? Will definitely look into it. Thanks again.

#55 seurto

seurto

    Elite Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 650 posts
  • Location:SWFW
  • Interests:FW, TX, history, cooking, party planning/giving (Par-Tays Plus), vino! My dogs, chickens and duck!

Posted 10 January 2007 - 07:47 AM

QUOTE(safly @ Jan 10 2007, 02:15 AM) View Post

QUOTE(seurto @ Jan 9 2007, 07:52 AM) View Post

Just asking - really - but aren't the TABC laws subject to change? If a casino group came in waving a big enough wad of cash and said "we need license to open the bars at any time at any price," would our fine upstanding legislature et al say "no, we do this for the good people of Texas."? Or would it be, "well, ya'know, it will benefit the people in the longrun if we give in to this group now"? Not that I'm cynical about gov'ment or anything (especially these days rolleyes.gif )...........



As far as changing laws. That would depend on who we vote in to office(s) (their stand on issues) and if these laws pose any threat to State and/or Federal constitutions (Judicial Appointees).

Lobbying is lobbying and it is purely motivated by FREE SPEECH????? OK, dollars too. smile.gif

Gubment is like a bridge that connects WE THE PEOPLE with DEMOCRACY, and it is VERY flexible in the long run, but always well supported. In a sense, GUBMENT is our little... "dog". Always there "for you" everyday. We are GUBMENT, and GUBMENT is YOU.

I think? mellow.gif


I do actually agree completely with you on this issue - one reason I'm against term limitations, too. Just seems that sometimes our little "dog" gets out of the back yard and runs amok; gotta whack it on the nose with a rolled up paper periodically. cool.gif


#56 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 10 January 2007 - 07:17 PM

The TABC literature is pretty self explanatory. Most likely created bya small group of flattop good ole boys who used to do their own "southern cookin" in the backwoods, then decided to get the most out of more establishments.

I can see them creating all of these laws for legislation in some smokey bar room poker den, the chaw seeping through their jumbled teeth. Vision that PORKY'S owner???

there is a website.
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#57 DFW

DFW

    Newcomer

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 11 February 2007 - 05:38 PM

The only form of casinos I would support, would be those along the border -- meaning they would have to be physically touching the border of new mexico, oklahoma, or louisianna. They wouldn't have any real negative impact on Texas cities, and would likely just capture the crowd heading to the out of state casinos anyways. Because of this, I say why not just allow those Casinos on the Texas side of the border and reap the massive tax benefits for our treasury. It would be a knockout blow for the economies of the borders states, but a boon for Texas.

#58 Fire-Eater

Fire-Eater

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Soon-to-be-Historic Wedgwood
  • Interests:Historic buildings and landscapes, local history, current events, coffee, hard liquor, and arguing!

Posted 11 February 2007 - 07:47 PM

QUOTE(DFW @ Feb 11 2007, 07:38 PM) View Post

The only form of casinos I would support, would be those along the border -- meaning they would have to be physically touching the border of new mexico, oklahoma, or louisianna. They wouldn't have any real negative impact on Texas cities, and would likely just capture the crowd heading to the out of state casinos anyways. Because of this, I say why not just allow those Casinos on the Texas side of the border and reap the massive tax benefits for our treasury. It would be a knockout blow for the economies of the borders states, but a boon for Texas.


I agree with DFW. I voted for Alliance -- as far away from Fort Worth as possible was my goal.

I believe casinos would RUIN the Stockyards and the North Side.
WWSPFD?*

History is but the record of the public and official acts of human beings. It is our object, therefore, to humanize our history and deal with people past and present; people who ate and possibly drank; people who were born, flourished and died; not grave tragedians, posing perpetually for their photographs. ~Bill Nye, History of the United States

For me there is no greater subject than history. How a man can study it and not be forced to become a philosopher, I cannot tell. ~George E. Wilson




*What Would Susan Pringle Frost Do?

#59 Dallastar

Dallastar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Location:Dallas White Rock Lake

Posted 09 March 2007 - 08:29 AM

Texas senators launch casino gambling bid

06:06 PM CST on Thursday, March 8, 2007
Associated Press

AUSTIN - Texans would get to vote on whether to allow full-scale casino gambling in up to a dozen spots across the state under legislation proposed Thursday by two high-profile senators.

Also Online
Capitol Letters : Texas Legislature blog

More Texas Legislature coverage
A major selling point, the legislators hope, is a part of the plan that would dedicate $1 billion per year to pay for eligible Texans to attend a community college or public university.

Sen. John Carona, a Dallas Republican, and Sen. Rodney Ellis, a Houston Democrat, are sponsoring the legislation. Both said they aren't gamblers and don't buy lottery tickets but that someone needs to stop the flow of gambling money leaving the state. They also said "destination resort casinos" will attract tourism money for other activities besides gambling.

Proponents of the measure say Texans already spend about $10 billion per year gambling -- some of it in other states and some of it illegally in Texas.

"Texans are already voting with their feet," Ellis said, referring to gamblers' trips to other states.

The proposed constitutional amendment, if approved by Texas voters, would allow for 12 casino gambling sites, three on Indian reservations. It also would allow video slot machines at horse and dog race tracks.







#60 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 09 March 2007 - 07:23 PM

That would sooo ROCK if they built a casino style resort where that run down hotel near the Masonic Temple now stands.


Kinda.
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com

#61 DrkLts

DrkLts

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,092 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:S. Fort Worth

Posted 09 March 2007 - 09:00 PM

^^^ My "BET" is that it wouldn't work. haha! Somewhere in downtown would fit a casino style tho. I've seen comments about sundance square kinda looking like a movie/theme park style the way the lighting and set up is at night. So a casino there would give us a mini Vegas look. lol

But a "Lone Star Casino" in the stockyards would be perfecto! wink.gif

#62 Dallastar

Dallastar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Location:Dallas White Rock Lake

Posted 02 April 2007 - 07:39 AM

Lawmakers want to roll dice on casino gambling

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Up to 12 casino projects in the state could pull tourists away from San Antonio into Dallas and other cities
Dallas Business Journal - March 30, 2007by W. Scott BaileySan Antonio Business Journal

As Texas' top visitor destination, San Antonio holds many of the cards when it comes to the tourism game.

But a bipartisan effort to legalize casino gambling in Texas, led by state lawmakers representing Dallas and Houston, could help other cities gain a bigger piece of the action.

Sens. John Carona, R-Dallas, and Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, are urging fellow state lawmakers to move swiftly on proposed legislation that would amend the constitution to allow legalized casino gaming in Texas.

As currently proposed, the Ellis-Carona Plan would dedicate revenue generated by state-regulated casino operations to financial aid programs designed to help ensure that more Texas students are in a position to afford the rising costs of attending college.

If passed by state lawmakers and approved by the voters, the legislation would establish the Texas Gaming Commission, which would be charged with licensing and regulating casinos. That commission would be authorized to grant up to 12 casino project licenses in Texas, with as many as seven going to Texas' larger urban areas.

Two additional casinos would be approved for the Gulf Coast region and up to three more would be spread out across the state in areas judged by the commission to best benefit from their job creation and economic impact.

"Poll after poll show an overwhelming majority of Texans support legalizing casino gaming," Ellis contends. "Texans are already voting with their feet and going out of state. It's time for Texas to reap the economic benefits and use that revenue to help Texas students go to college."

Top target
At press time, the proposed legislation, SB 1359, had been referred to the State Affairs committee.

Carona says the reason it deserves support is "a matter of economics."

He says Texans are already spending $10 billion annually on gambling, with most of that money leaving the state.

Texas economist Ray Perryman says well-regulated casino gaming in Texas could create as many as 400,000 new, permanent jobs. He says it could generate as much as $4.5 billion in state and local revenue.

The economic impact in construction alone, according to Perryman, could reach $45 billion.

Before any Texas city could get in on the action, a local election would have to be called. County voters would have to approve such a development.

That approval could prove difficult to come by in San Antonio, where leaders have historically been somewhere between lukewarm and cold to the idea of adding casinos to the Alamo City's list of attractions.

Greg Gallaspy, executive director of the Paseo del Rio Association, says San Antonio is likely a No. 1 target for potential casino developers. And the same River Walk area Gallaspy's nonprofit organization works to preserve and promote would no doubt be one of the hotter spots.

"I think it (legalizing casino gambling on the River Walk) would be bad for a lot of reasons," he explains.

It would, among other things, hurt existing businesses along the famed waterway, Gallaspy contends.

"I don't think this is something for the River Walk," he adds.

The Baptist General Convention of Texas is among the critics who have argued that casinos would negatively impact existing Texas tourist attractions like the River Walk.

Still, some critics and proponents are convinced that Texas will eventually legalize casino gaming.

"It's only a matter of time," Gallaspy says, adding that cities like Houston and Dallas will no doubt try to use casinos as another means of luring more visitors away from San Antonio.

Starting point
If approved, Ellis' and Carona's proposed legislation would also legalize video lottery terminals at horse and greyhound tracks. That could provide a boost for the Retama Park horse track, where officials have lobbied for the legalization of these slot-like machines.

But adding casinos to the Texas landscape could have a negative impact on businesses currently making money off of gamblers who now have to travel outside the Lone Star State.

Star Shuttle & Charter, for example, is a privately owned San Antonio-based company which transports riders to Louisiana casinos for as little as $20. There could be fewer San Antonians seeking a long bus ride if they could gamble here at home.

Asked if his company has taken a position yet on the proposed legislation legalizing Texas casino gambling, Star Shuttle President John Walker simply says, "no."

Carona and Ellis say their proposed legislation is a starting point for discussion, not a conclusion to the process.

"We fully understand that the details of this legislation will change as we work with our colleagues throughout the session," Ellis explains.

He adds, "We are married to only one provision: Dedicating this revenue to help more Texans go to college."

sbailey@bizjournals.com | 210 477-0853

#63 safly

safly

    Skyscraper Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ALAMO!
  • Interests:Restaurants. Golf. Garlic. FIESTA. Beer ME.

Posted 02 April 2007 - 09:19 AM

I totally agree about the SA front.

SA will not approve of a casino. WHY? Because we already have twice as many destinations as any other city in TX and THE historical monument of the state lies right in our backyard. What gambling money that would have otherwise been spent on our local economy with several attractions and a bustling food/hospitality services industry, will just go to the casinos and state. City property taxes is the best way to support city public schools. A total support structure from the state level is too thinned out and unrealistic. WE'RE TOO BIG!

If local casinos supported a local economy in several fronts then SA would have a much different approach. So now I get why so many backlashed the idea of state supported casinos in their area. Seems as if the likes of Shreveport/ Bossier City and LVegas really had no historical preservation(destinations) or a local econmy to begin with, pre-casino. But look at them now in comparison.
COWTOWN! Get your TIP ON!
www.iheartfw.com




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users