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#1 BlueMound

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 08:35 PM

rent too high
http://www.star-tele...e137318178.html

#2 Austin55

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 09:02 PM

That's a huge bummer. S&R seems to be holding down the fort of Southside's music venues.

#3 John T Roberts

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 09:55 PM

That's really a shame.   I kind of liked the place.



#4 renamerusk

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 07:28 AM

rent too high...

 

 Perhaps the idea of "rent control" districts should be discussed.  If rent began to accelerate,  the  efforts of startups who are the catalysts that invigorates the district, will become the victims of the hard work.  The City tauts the Magnolia area, the Stockyards, the Cultural District, etc.; then it can help by providing tax incentives and variances that will help small businesses with their  dealings with avaricious landlords.  



#5 Doohickie

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 08:46 AM

Did anyone read any of the articles about the closure and understand what actually happened here?  I think it boils down to raised rent, but it sounded like ownership of the (building?  business?) played a part in there, that there was some kind of complicated arrangement that the building owner took advantage of?


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#6 John T Roberts

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 09:58 AM

Yes, I read the articles, and I agree with you, Doohickie.  I think it was a complicated arrangement, and that led to the closure.



#7 renamerusk

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 10:34 AM

Yes, I read the articles, and I agree with you, Doohickie.  I think it was a complicated arrangement, and that led to the closure.

 

 Complicated arrangement, yes.  What is the fallout to other nearby businesses when a venue of this kind closes?

 

 Yet, landlords, who admittedly have a right to price their property, may cause the unanticipated consequence of killing the goose that lays the golden egg.  It is in the interest of both the City and the landlords that these micro areas of the City remain affordable, less, there will be vacancies that will deter future investment and startups.



#8 JBB

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 11:16 AM

Maybe it only applies to residential rental, but isn't rent control only allowed in Texas during a disaster and with the governor's approval?  Doesn't mean there aren't other incentives municipalities can provide, but I would be surprised if rent control is legal in a property owner friendly state like Texas.



#9 Austin55

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 12:00 PM

FW Weekly on the news -

https://www.fwweekly.../live-oak-dead/

#10 rriojas71

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 12:12 PM

Unfortunately I think this is just the start. I know people on here hate the word gentrification (kentrification) but in everyplace that I have lived that has adopted this direction they ended up turning those ares into sterile playgrounds for the wealthy & young professionals. It happened in San Francisco, it happened in Seattle, it's happening in Austin and Dallas, and soon it will happen here.

The area is already becoming overpriced for Fort Worth and it doesn't seem like that is going to change anytime soon. Although I applaud re-developing downtrodden areas that have fallen into blight; at the same time I loathe the greed and elitism that it breeds.

The middle class, the poor, young families, city & service workers who are vital to the health of a communty are priced out and banished to the aging outskirts of the city while having to commute long distances to get to a from work.

It's hard for me at times to pick a side because I see the benefit with both sides of the argument. I will just take my glass is half full approach and hope that this direction turns out for the best.

#11 Doohickie

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 12:59 PM

I totally get it.  At one time we considered moving into the Fairmount neighborhood.  Now I can't afford it.  Talking to friends that live there, they are either disappointed that it is now priced out of the range were "people like them" can move in, or they're becoming cynical about new, more affluent neighbors moving in.

 

Even more alarming is that it's not just Fairmount.  We figured that if not Fairmount, perhaps the fringes of Ryan Place (near Berry)  might be affordable, but they're going up now too, so I figured maybe Shaw Clarke, South Hills, etc., but even small homes in those areas are jumping in price, almost weekly.  (At this point, we're starting to settle on the concept of just remaining in the "Slums of North Crowley" at McCart & Sycamore School.  Maybe by the time I'm old and decrepit, my neighborhood will be gentrifying  ;) )


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#12 Dismuke

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 09:41 AM

I totally get it.  At one time we considered moving into the Fairmount neighborhood.  Now I can't afford it.  Talking to friends that live there, they are either disappointed that it is now priced out of the range were "people like them" can move in, or they're becoming cynical about new, more affluent neighbors moving in.

 

 

 

You have just described in a nutshell the 100 plus year history of the Fairmount neighborhood.  All sorts of dramatic changes have occurred in that neighborhood.  But the one constant has been different waves of people in the neighborhood complaining: "Eeeew yuck!  People like them are moving in!  Those people aren't like us."

People were saying that when the neighborhood first began to lose its luster and its original occupants moved to more prestigious locations elsewhere in the city.  And successive waves said it when the neighborhood began its decades-long decline as it aged and newcomers became increasingly lower income and the large houses were divided into apartments and single room occupancy establishments.   And people were saying it after the neighborhood hit rock bottom and the urban pioneers who were very different from most existing residents moved in and began to restore the houses.  And, as those urban pioneers began to move on, of course, the people who came in behind them were likely to be more affluent than they were.  They were likely to be more affluent because they were paying a higher price for an already fixed-up house in a desirable neighborhood instead of a run-down house in an undesirable neighborhood.

 

My guess is the people who were well-entrenched in the neighborhood when "people like" you and your friends began to move in felt the same way about them as your friends feel about the affluent people who are moving in now.

 

 

rriojas71 writes in a previous posting:

 

The middle class, the poor, young families, city & service workers who are vital to the health of a communty are priced out and banished to the aging outskirts of the city while having to commute long distances to get to a from work.

 

And just a very few decades ago people were complaining that the exact same groups of people you described were stuck in the central city and were priced out of being able to escape to the more desirable lifestyles and amenities available only to those who could afford to live in the outskirts of the city.  The distance of those outskirts to various points was just as far back then as it is now.  The only thing that has changed is which area is considered trendy and desirable and which area is not.  And that is always going to be the case - the fact that some areas are considered trendy necessarily implies that there are other areas which are not.

 

And, in fact, the communities that are today being built on the very outer ring of those outskirts are usually anything but inexpensive and the people there certainly have jobs they must commute to.  The places where the people you describe are increasingly having to move to are the ageing inner ring suburbs - and they are more commuter friendly than the more prosperous outer ring suburbs.

 

All of this is the natural cycle over time for any city that grows and is able to maintain its economic vitality.   As neighborhoods fall out of fashion, they become opportunities for those with lower incomes than the original occupants -  just as cars discarded by their original owners become opportunities for those with more limited budgets. 

 

They don't manufacture new cars for the very low income market because such people are able to get more for their money with a used car than the undesirable, stripped down econo-box that would necessarily have to be made in order to sell a car at such a low price point.  The same tends to be true with housing. The smallish tract houses built in the decades immediately following World War II in enormous quantities in our area have long since fallen out of fashion in the same way that the large houses from the late 19th and early 20th century when family sizes were larger had fallen out of fashion by end of the war.  Lower income people have been moving to the inner ring suburbs for the same reasons that people with similar income levels moved to neighborhoods such as Fairmount decades earlier.

 

There are still some pre-war neighborhoods in Fort Worth that could benefit from the "urban pioneer" types who turned around Fairmount.  And for those who are long on imagination and creativity but short on income, some of the houses from the late 1940s and 1950s in places such as certain parts of  River Oaks and Haltom City were well-built, have a certain charm to them, are close to the central city and are relatively affordable.  My guess is that, assuming our area remains economically vibrant, at some point the houses in such areas will either be torn down for newer ones or it will become fashionable to fix them up.

 

If our area does not continue to grow then we will share the experience of many other cities: the neighborhoods that don't decline will remain more or less static. I would much rather have the challenges and frustrations of economic vibrancy than the challenges and frustrations of stagnation.


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