Architecture in Fort Worth

 

City National Bank Building

315 Houston - c.1884-85; addition - c. 1914-15; restoration - 1981

This building was designed by Haggard and Sanguinet and is one of Fort Worth's oldest commercial facades still intact. (The interior of the building was rebuilt in 1981 as a part of the original Sundance Square development.) Originally, the Second Empire style building was 4 stories tall, had a mansard roof, was only 25 feet wide, and extended to the alley. About 1914-15, the building was doubled in width to the north and was extended across the alley. At some point between 1910 and 1920, the mansard roofed 4th floor was removed.  A few years later, the facade was stuccoed over. In 1981, the stucco was removed, the brick repointed and replaced, and the fourth floor was reconstructed when the building's exterior was restored. At that time, the interior was removed and rebuilt.  The architect for the restoration was Thomas S. Woodward & Associates of Dallas.  Thos. S. Byrne of Fort Worth was the contractor.  From 1983 until September 2010, the building was home to Billy Miner's Saloon.  It was a well known gathering place for downtown workers.  Loft has opened in part of the restaurant space at the intersection of 3rd and Houston.

 

 

 


City National Bank

2002 Photograph
City National Bank